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Previous related question: Is this code decoupled and am I doing it right?

Here is how my code looks now:

using System.Collections.Generic;
using SharpDIC.Api.Models;

namespace SharpDIC.Api.Interfaces
{
    public interface IMemberFinder
    {
        IList<Member> FindAllMembers();
        Member FindMember(int memberId);
        Member FindMember(string memberName);
    }
}



using SharpDIC.Api.Interfaces;

namespace SharpDIC.Api
{
    public class MemberLister
    {
        private IMemberFinder _finder;

        public MemberLister(IMemberFinder finder)
        {
            this._finder = finder;
        }
    }
}

This seems to finally be decoupled! :D Thanks for your suggestions and help. Now what I'm asking is, where do I write the actual code that actually GETS the XML response from the exposed API. How would I organize that part of code?

The reason why I'm using a IMemberFinder is because I intend to use JSON and other future exposed API's seamlessly.

Thanks for the help guys, you are a tremendous help for developers looking to expand their horizons.

Edit: More succinctly my question is: Where would I write the methods to get the XML? Since I'm not using the interface like 'public class MemberFinder : IMemberFinder', how do I implement the methods of the interface?

share|improve this question
    
Sorry, what are you asking? Where to put your IMemberFinder implementation? –  annakata Dec 16 '10 at 15:21
    
@annakata: I think his question is a follow up of this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/4461517/… –  Kristof Claes Dec 16 '10 at 15:24
    
@annakata: Where do I write in the actual code that will fetch the XML and load a Member object? –  delete Dec 16 '10 at 15:27
    
@kristof - I can see that, but IO don't see a clear question here. NVM, it got answered. –  annakata Dec 16 '10 at 16:21
    
You shouldn't be exposing IList<> in your interface. Use ICollection<> or IEnumerable<> instead.... probably pointed out before. –  Sklivvz Dec 18 '10 at 10:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Sergio,

here you go. All that was missing was your concrete implementation of the class:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using SharpDIC.Api.Interfaces;
using SharpDIC.Api.Models;

namespace SharpDIC.Api.Interfaces
{
    public interface IMember
    {
        int Id { get; set; }
        string Name { get; set; }
    }
    public interface IMemberFinder
    {
        IList<IMember> FindAllMembers();
        IMember FindMember(int memberId);
        IMember FindMember(string memberName);
    }
}

namespace SharpDIC.Api.Models
{
    public class Member : IMember
    {
        public int Id { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }
    }
}

namespace SharpDIC.Api.Classes
{
    public class MyImplementedClass : IMemberFinder
    {
        public IList<IMember> FindAllMembers()
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }

        public IMember FindMember(int memberId)
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }

        public IMember FindMember(string memberName)
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }
    }
}

namespace SharpDIC.Api
{
    public class MemberLister
    {
        private IMemberFinder _finder;

        // you would inject the concrete class MyImplementedClass 
        // here - bingo
        public MemberLister(IMemberFinder finder)
        {
            this._finder = finder;
        }

        public void GetMyXml()
        {
            var result = _finder.FindAllMembers();
        }
    }
}

[updated] - to include IMember interface and Member class implemented against it. cheers

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I was working on the code while waiting for answers and refreshed and saw your answer. It's nice to see I got the same thing. I think I'm getting the hang of it. –  delete Dec 16 '10 at 16:07
    
yup - let's hope it doesn't keep you awake at night, the same way it did for me initially :-) btw - i would in a real app probably implement the Member class from an interface as well. i know it sounds long winded but this would allow you to unit test your Member model more effectively... –  jim tollan Dec 16 '10 at 16:09
    
You implement an interface, not inherit from it. –  Marcie Dec 17 '10 at 16:05
    
marcie - slip of the fingers, but hopefully the example clarified the intent and understanding of the 'paradox' :-). typo sorted.. seasons greetings from chilly sw scotland!! –  jim tollan Dec 18 '10 at 10:26

Now you have to create a effective implementation of your interface and a IOC container to inject your dependencies into MemberLister and you will be state of the art "Decoupled".

Now for the output, you can apply the same pattern having a IMemberSerializer injected into your finder or return IEnumerable and inject this into your serializer from the calling code. either are OK but I prefer the later option since your finder should not even now the list will be serialized.

share|improve this answer
    
"you will be state of the art "Decoupled"." - That made me laugh, thanks for your comments. This is quite hard for me to grasp, totally shifting my paradigm. –  delete Dec 16 '10 at 15:28
    
You will so much enjoy it when you will be used.. –  VdesmedT Dec 16 '10 at 15:35

The next step would be to implement your IMemberFinder interface (in this case as an XmlMemberFinder concrete type - XmlMemberFinder.cs), and register the concrete implementation against the abstraction in your IoC container.

Whether you place this concrete type in the same assembly, or its own assembly will depend on how you want to seperate out your solution, and if you want the type to be discoverable, and where you want it to be discoverable from (for example if you're using something like MEF).

Also, any reason why your FindMember methods aren't returning abstractions of your Member type (IMember)?

share|improve this answer
    
To be honest, in my train of thought the logical thing to do would return a concrete Member object. Do you suggest I create an IMember interface? What would go into the interface, and what reasoning is behind this suggestion? What benefit would this bring? –  delete Dec 16 '10 at 15:33
    
As an example, if you used IMember, you could still use your XmlMemberFinder in your unit tests, but mock out the FindMember method for a particular member id or name to always return a particular result, but return the actual xml data for the other id's/names. –  devdigital Dec 16 '10 at 16:02

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