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In .NET 4, System.IO.Path has the following overloads for the Combine method:

public static string Combine(params string[] paths)
public static string Combine(string path1, string path2)
public static string Combine(string path1, string path2, string path3)
public static string Combine(string path1, string path2, string path3, string path4)

The first one was added in .NET 4 to support any number of path arguments. The second one was already there in earlier versions so I suppose it is kept for backwards compatibility.

But I'm curious what the use of the other overloads is. Aren't these use cases already covered by the first method signature with params?

edit: I now believe that the answer is "because not all languages have params support (and passing an array without params support is inconvenient)". However, the stackoverflow hive mind seems to disagree strongly. Therefore, as a compromise, I am not accepting any answer.

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2  
My guess is backward compatibility. –  Shurdoof Dec 16 '10 at 16:33
1  
@Shurdoof only the second one was available before. The other three are all new to .NET 4, so there's no backwards-ness between the first, third, and fourth. –  Tesserex Dec 16 '10 at 16:35
2  
@Shurdoof - at .NET 3.5 there was only the 2nd method - msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/fyy7a5kt(v=VS.90).aspx –  ChrisF Dec 16 '10 at 16:36
1  
Yeah, just remembered that. checked with reflector and they don't call the params overload, so it's probably for perfomance reasons. –  Shurdoof Dec 16 '10 at 16:39
    
@k3b You have a number of issue with your performance test which make it incorrect\inconclusive e.g. using DateTime.Now, not testing 2 and 3 parameter version, and not taking GC into consideration. I have updated my answer with more expanded tests on these issues. –  Tim Lloyd Dec 19 '10 at 15:18

6 Answers 6

I would suspect for performance as you have to create an intermediary array with params, plus the overhead of traversing the array, etc. There are probably some internal, etc, cases where there is a good case for using the fixed numbered parameter versions.

Update

I have now carried out performance tests to check my assumptions. This is something I should have done in the first place - I broke my own performance mantra:

Don't think - measure.

My assumptions are not entirely correct, but not entirely wrong. The 4 fixed parameter version is marginally slower than the 4 params version, but the 3 and 2 fixed variations perform significantly better.

There are a number of issues with the performance test harness for the current accepted answer which states that performance goes entirely in favour of the params version - this is incorrect:

  • It uses DateTime.Now for timing - always use a Stopwatch for micro benchmarking as DatTime.Now is only accurate to between ~10ms->15ms. There are endless articles on this.
  • The test only covers the case of the 4 parameter version - what about the 3 and 2 parameter versions?
  • Garbage generation and collection are not taken into consideration. One method might be faster in a straight line between A->B, but it might also generate a lot of garbage which will have to be cleaned up at some stage. This is a deferred performance penalty, but it is still a performance impact so should be taken into consideration.
  • Ensure arguments have realistic values - is combining single character paths realistic?

I have the following performance results which I have included 2, 3 and 4 argument variations where it can be seen that performance is significantly better for 2 and 3 variations, and marginally worse for the 4 variation. The fixed number argument versions are faster on the whole though, with 3 being the most significant in terms of this question (the 2 argument variation existed since .Net 1.1).

***2 Args***
params2:3018.44ms
params2:3007.61ms
params2:2988.52ms
params2:2992.33ms
params2:2995.89ms
args2  :1724.83ms
args2  :1723.97ms
args2  :1727.76ms
args2  :1720.42ms
args2  :1718.24ms
***3 Args***
params3:4168.37ms
params3:4169.61ms
params3:4165.63ms
params3:4161.51ms
params3:4153.61ms
args3  :3476.96ms
args3  :3483.40ms
args3  :3482.49ms
args3  :3595.15ms
args3  :3561.11ms
***4 Args***
params4:4992.71ms
params4:4985.51ms
params4:4995.63ms
params4:5002.47ms
params4:4993.99ms
args4  :4993.02ms
args4  :4992.93ms
args4  :4991.07ms
args4  :4993.04ms
args4  :4995.14ms

Test:

public void MeasurePathPerformance()
{
    const int TestIterations = 5;
    const string Root = "C:\\xxxxxxxxxx";
    string seg = new string('x', 10);
    string path = null;

    Action<string, Func<double>> test = (name, action) =>
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < TestIterations; i++)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("{0}:{1:F2}ms", name, action());
        }
    };

    Console.WriteLine("***2 Args***");
    Action p2 = () => path = Path.Combine(new[] { Root, seg });
    test("params2", () => TimeTest(p2));
    Action a2 = () => path = Path.Combine(Root, seg);
    test("args2  ", () => TimeTest(a2));

    Console.WriteLine("***3 Args***");
    Action p3 = () => path = Path.Combine(new[] { Root, seg, seg });
    test("params3", () => TimeTest(p3));
    Action a3 = () => path = Path.Combine(Root, seg, seg);
    test("args3  ", () => TimeTest(a3));

    Console.WriteLine("***4 Args***");
    Action p4 = () => path = Path.Combine(new[] { Root, seg, seg, seg });
    test("params4", () => TimeTest(p4));
    Action a4 = () => path = Path.Combine(Root, seg, seg, seg);
    test("args4  ", () => TimeTest(a4));

    Console.WriteLine(path);
}

[SuppressMessage("Microsoft.Reliability", "CA2001:AvoidCallingProblematicMethods", MessageId = "System.GC.Collect")]
private static double TimeTest(Action action)
{
    const int Iterations = 10 * 1000 * 1000;

    Action gc = () =>
    {
        GC.Collect();
        GC.WaitForFullGCComplete();
    };

    Action empty = () => { };

    Stopwatch stopwatch1 = Stopwatch.StartNew();

    for (int j = 0; j < Iterations; j++)
    {
        empty();
    }

    double loopElapsed = stopwatch1.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds;

    gc();

    action(); //JIT
    action(); //Optimize

    Stopwatch stopwatch2 = Stopwatch.StartNew();

    for (int j = 0; j < Iterations; j++)
    {
        action();
    }

    gc();

    double testElapsed = stopwatch2.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds;

    return (testElapsed - loopElapsed);
}
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+1: I completely agree. –  decyclone Dec 16 '10 at 16:36
2  
after some reflectorizing (real word), I can confirm that the code for the two paths is much more efficient than the params version. –  poindexter12 Dec 16 '10 at 16:39
1  
This is the the same reason that String.Format has multiple overloads that avoid the params argument. –  Richard Dec 16 '10 at 16:51
    
Intuitively this would seem correct. But measurements show that the array version is actually faster. Can we all stop up-voting the wrong answer please? –  Wim Coenen Dec 19 '10 at 12:38
    
@Wim Please see my updated answer. The answer you have accepted has a number of shortcomings in its performance test which mean its results are incorrect\inconclusive. –  Tim Lloyd Dec 19 '10 at 15:12

Backwards compatibility is the best reason I can think of. The overloads are probably all calling the first method.

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" The overloads are probably all calling the first method." This would explain why the array version is slightly faster than the parameter version. (See my answer below) –  k3b Dec 16 '10 at 17:42

Its just because of performance, the performance of the last 3 is greater then the first method.

If you want to know the implementation, just look at mscorlib with reflector, you'll see the performance will be better in the last 3 functions

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Then how do you explain k3b's measurements which show that the array version is faster? –  Wim Coenen Dec 19 '10 at 12:47
    
As you see with 2 and 3 parameters are far faster, the one with 4 params is almost the same so I think the team said it's just for the ease of the developers ... yet my answer is indeed not 100% correct ... –  Tom Vervoort Dec 19 '10 at 16:03

I think the reason is that most of programmers use one, two, three or four values to combine and more than that you want to think its better to implement an array rather to use more values.

Example

Sum(a , b); //fine
Sum(a , b , c);//fine
Sum(a , b , c , d);//fine
Sum(a , b , c , d ,....); //now I think you think everyone think  even Microsoft also thinks, its better to implement array here

// something like this
Sum(params var[] n);   

So you will found most of the method holds 1,2,3,4 arguments and then params

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Completely agree with you, I was going to say the same. Maybe the example would be better with a method. –  SoMoS Dec 16 '10 at 17:21
    
@SoMoS: Yeah, Thanx for suggestion, Updated :) –  Javed Akram Dec 16 '10 at 17:27

What about syntactic shugar for languages that do not support something similar to the c#-"params" keyword

Update

Removed Performance issue since i measured only the 4 parameter version but not the 3 and 2 parameter version that are realy faster

The performance is not the reason. (See my benchmark below)

Benchmark

I measured the performance. To my surprise the array version was slightly better.

    [TestMethod]
    public void MeasurePathPerfomance()
    {
        // repeat several times to avoid jit-issues
        for (int j = 0; j < 10; j++)
        {
            {
                DateTime start = DateTime.Now;

                string result;
                for (int i = 0; i < 30000; i++)
                {
                    result = System.IO.Path.Combine("a", "b", "c", "d"); // use 4 parameter version
                }
                TimeSpan spend = DateTime.Now - start;
                System.Console.WriteLine("4 param : {0}", spend.TotalMilliseconds);
            }
            {
                DateTime start = DateTime.Now;

                string result;
                for (int i = 0; i < 30000; i++)
                {
                    result = System.IO.Path.Combine(new string[] { "a", "b", "c", "d" });
                }
                TimeSpan spend = DateTime.Now - start;
                System.Console.WriteLine("array[4] param : {0}", spend.TotalMilliseconds);
            }
        }
    }

result

    4 param : 10.001
    array[4] param : 9.0009
    4 param : 12.0012
    array[4] param : 8.0008
    4 param : 12.0012
    array[4] param : 10.001
    4 param : 11.0011
    array[4] param : 9.0009
    4 param : 11.0011
    array[4] param : 11.0011
    4 param : 11.0011
    array[4] param : 9.0009
    4 param : 10.001
    array[4] param : 8.0008
    4 param : 10.001
    array[4] param : 9.0009
    4 param : 11.0011
    array[4] param : 9.0009
    4 param : 11.0011
    array[4] param : 9.0009

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I have confirmed your result: the array version is faster! –  Wim Coenen Dec 19 '10 at 12:35
    
I am accepting this answer because your suggestion at the end is probably correct: the other overload must be there to support .Net languages which don't have a "params" equivalent. Does anyone know of such a .NET language? –  Wim Coenen Dec 19 '10 at 12:39
    
Thanks Wim for inspiraton. I reedited my article by moving the central issue ("params" equivalent) from bottom to top of article. –  k3b Dec 19 '10 at 13:08
    
@k3b There are a number of issues with your performance test which make it incorrect\inconclusive. Please see my updated answer below. –  Tim Lloyd Dec 19 '10 at 15:16
1  
Don't use DateTime.Now for performance measurements. Use Stopwatch instead. –  Brian Rasmussen Dec 19 '10 at 15:37

One possible reason can also be to reduce pressure on the garbage collector. The params-array overload creates a new array each time the method is called. If the method is called often, a lot of temporary array objects are created, increasing pressure on the garbage collector.

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