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I have a ListView in tile mode. I have created a custom method to fire when the SizeChanged event is fired. Is there anyway to override this so the method fires before the SizeChanged event is fired?

I tried looking for a SizeChanging event but there isnt one. How can I do this?

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what is setting this change off? Client window size; code, etc.? –  curtisk Dec 16 '10 at 18:32
    
Only the form's ResizeBegin event is a candidate here. Relevant only if the list view is docked or anchored. Anything else requires a time machine. –  Hans Passant Dec 16 '10 at 20:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In order to add some logic before the SizeChanged event is fired, you'll need to subclass the existing ListView control. Create a new class in your project and paste this code into it:

public class CustomListView : ListView
{

    protected override void OnSizeChanged(System.EventArgs e)
    {
        //Fire my custom method before the ListView's size is changed
        MyCustomMethod();

        base.OnSizeChanged(e);
    }

    private void MyCustomMethod()
    {
        //Insert your custom logic here
        //...
    }    

}

Then build your project, and use this CustomListView control (or whatever you decide to name it) instead of the standard ListView.


Alternatively, if you want to decouple the custom logic from the control itself, you can have your custom listview raise an event instead. Then, you can handle this new event (we'll call it SizeChanging for consistency) wherever you need in your code. For example, modifying the above example:

public class CustomListView : ListView
{

    public event EventHandler SizeChanging;

    protected override void OnSizeChanged(System.EventArgs e)
    {
        //Raise the SizeChanging event before the ListView's size is changed
        if (SizeChanging != null) {
            SizeChanging(this, e);
        }

        base.OnSizeChanged(e);
    }

}
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nitpicky: Control derives from System.ComponentModel.Component and all control (and Form) events are managed by Component.Events (System.ComponentModel.EventHandlerList). It is advisable to use this mechanism rather than adding event pointers to your Control instance. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Tergiver Dec 16 '10 at 19:00
1  
@Tergiver: Interesting, I don't think I've ever seen that anywhere. Out of curiosity, since the documentation that you link to doesn't say that, is there somewhere in particular that's suggested, perhaps with an example? –  Cody Gray Dec 16 '10 at 19:06
    
If you're asking for a better than Tergiver reference that recommends using that pattern, I don't have one. I would encourage you to exercise logic. A class with 20 events has 20 pointers, even if there are no subscribers to any of those events. Using Component.Events reduces your class' footprint by eliminating the pointers. The link I gave has an example in the community content section. Control.Events is already exposed (protected), so you don't have to declare it. I dislike the use of string keys in the example, preferring static readonly object KeyIdentifier = new Object() instead. –  Tergiver Dec 16 '10 at 20:05
    
I added an example as an answer to show your code modified to use Component.Events. –  Tergiver Dec 16 '10 at 20:11
    
@Tergiver: I see. I think you might be talking about the same thing covered in this article: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc163533.aspx. But the way I understand that (and your last comment) is that it gives you a finer level of control over the add/remove accessors for an event, which is useful when you're exposing a lot of events, but probably not necessary in ≈95% of cases. –  Cody Gray Dec 16 '10 at 20:15

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