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If I have a hierarchy of view model instances, should I route events?

For example, say we have

class A: INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public B Child ...
}

and

class B
{
    A _parent

    void OnPropertyChanged (string propertyName)
    {
        if (PropertyChanged != null) PropertyChanged (this, propertyName);
        ///Should I call _parent.OnPropertyChanged (this, propertyName);?////
     }
}

Should the B call NotifyPropertyChanged in A.

The argument for routing is that it can be awfully convenient. In particular, if instead of one child, A has a collection of B, becoming informed of any change any child of A becomes very difficult. Also, there is a sender first argument, why not use it... the argument against is that the parent event can become crowded.

Any opinion?

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3 Answers 3

If your front end bindings are actually binding to the child objects like:

{Binding B.PropertyName}

, then there's not really a need to bubble the event up like that. If your parent ViewModel actually needs to change other properties or do some work on the child when that property changes, then it might be a good idea.

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I agree with you if A has only one child. But what if A has many children? –  user542393 Dec 16 '10 at 18:55
    
Are you referring to the scenario where A has a collection of "B" children? Or where A has other children model types like B, C and D for example? –  Steve Danner Dec 16 '10 at 19:00
    
Both. What if a developer wants to know if "anything happened to A or one of its children". I understand it's possible to listen to all events of a collection; also, it's possible to listen to B, C, and D. But it is cumbersome. –  user542393 Dec 16 '10 at 19:11

If you have the child object doing property-change notification for its parent, you're tightly coupling the child to the parent, and engaging the child in the implementation details of the parent. Consider: now whenever you implement a new property in the parent that is in some way dependent on the state of a child, you have to modify the child class to support it.

The loosely-coupled way to do this (or, as I like to think of it, the right way) is to make the objects ignorant of each others' internal details. Have the parent listen to property-change notification events that the children raise, and have it set its properties and raise its property-change events accordingly.

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I would invert the event routing. You could have class A (parent) attach to PropertyChanged event of its B property, such that anytime class B raises a PropertyChanged event, class A will be notified of a change in B and can then raise its PropertyChanged event.

You can also utilize a monitoring class that handles raising of property changes to a delegate. Here is a quick example (not meant for production code).

Assume we have a Person class that exposes a Name property that describes the full name of the person (last, first, and middle name). We want to raise the PropertyChanged event for the Name property whenever one of the sub-properties of the Name are modified.

FullName class:

public class FullName : INotifyPropertyChanged, IEquatable<FullName>
{
    //=======================================================================================================
    //  Constructors
    //=======================================================================================================
    #region FullName()
    public FullName()
    {

    }
    #endregion

    //=======================================================================================================
    //  Public Properties
    //=======================================================================================================
    #region FirstName
    public string FirstName
    {
        get
        {
            return _firstName;
        }

        set
        {
            if (!String.Equals(_firstName, value, StringComparison.Ordinal))
            {
                _firstName = !String.IsNullOrEmpty(value) ? value.Trim() : String.Empty;
                this.OnPropertyChanged("FirstName");
            }
        }
    }
    private string _firstName = String.Empty;
    #endregion

    #region LastName
    public string LastName
    {
        get
        {
            return _lastName;
        }

        set
        {
            if (!String.Equals(_lastName, value, StringComparison.Ordinal))
            {
                _lastName = !String.IsNullOrEmpty(value) ? value.Trim() : String.Empty;
                this.OnPropertyChanged("LastName");
            }
        }
    }
    private string _lastName = String.Empty;
    #endregion

    #region MiddleName
    public string MiddleName
    {
        get
        {
            return _middleName;
        }

        set
        {
            if (!String.Equals(_middleName, value, StringComparison.Ordinal))
            {
                _middleName = !String.IsNullOrEmpty(value) ? value.Trim() : String.Empty;
                this.OnPropertyChanged("MiddleName");
            }
        }
    }
    private string _middleName = String.Empty;
    #endregion

    //=======================================================================================================
    //  Public Methods
    //=======================================================================================================
    #region Equals(FullName first, FullName second)
    /// <summary>
    /// Determines whether two specified <see cref="FullName"/> objects have the same value.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="first">The first role to compare, or <see langword="null"/>.</param>
    /// <param name="second">The second role to compare, or <see langword="null"/>.</param>
    /// <returns>
    /// <see langword="true"/> if the value of <paramref name="first"/> object is the same as the value of <paramref name="second"/> object; otherwise, <see langword="false"/>.
    /// </returns>
    public static bool Equals(FullName first, FullName second)
    {
        if (first == null && second != null)
        {
            return false;
        }
        else if (first != null && second == null)
        {
            return false;
        }
        else if (first == null && second == null)
        {
            return true;
        }
        else
        {
            return first.Equals(second);
        }
    }
    #endregion

    #region ToString()
    /// <summary>
    /// Returns a <see cref="String"/> that represents the current <see cref="FullName"/>.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>
    /// A <see cref="String"/> that represents the current <see cref="FullName"/>.
    /// </returns>
    public override string ToString()
    {
        return String.Format(null, "{0}, {1} {2}", this.LastName, this.FirstName, this.MiddleName).Trim();
    }
    #endregion

    //=======================================================================================================
    //  IEquatable<FullName> Implementation
    //=======================================================================================================
    #region Equals(FullName other)
    /// <summary>
    /// Indicates whether the current object is equal to another object of the same type.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="other">An object to compare with this object.</param>
    /// <returns><see langword="true"/> if the current object is equal to the other parameter; otherwise, <see langword="false"/>.</returns>
    public bool Equals(FullName other)
    {
        if (other == null)
        {
            return false;
        }

        if (!String.Equals(this.FirstName, other.FirstName, StringComparison.Ordinal))
        {
            return false;
        }
        else if (!String.Equals(this.LastName, other.LastName, StringComparison.Ordinal))
        {
            return false;
        }
        else if (!String.Equals(this.MiddleName, other.MiddleName, StringComparison.Ordinal))
        {
            return false;
        }

        return true;
    }
    #endregion

    #region Equals(object obj)
    /// <summary>
    /// Determines whether the specified <see cref="Object"/> is equal to the current <see cref="Object"/>.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="obj">The <see cref="Object"/> to compare with the current <see cref="Object"/>.</param>
    /// <returns>
    /// <see langword="true"/> if the specified <see cref="Object"/> is equal to the current <see cref="Object"/>; otherwise, <see langword="false"/>.
    /// </returns>
    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        return this.Equals(obj as FullName);
    }
    #endregion

    #region GetHashCode()
    /// <summary>
    /// Returns the hash code for this instance.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>A 32-bit signed integer hash code.</returns>
    /// <a href="http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.object.gethashcode.aspx"/>
    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        int firstNameHashCode   = this.FirstName.GetHashCode();
        int lastNameHashCode    = this.LastName.GetHashCode();
        int middleNameHashCode  = this.MiddleName.GetHashCode();

        /*
            * The 23 and 37 are arbitrary numbers which are co-prime.
            * 
            * The benefit of the below over the XOR (^) method is that if you have a type 
            * which has two values which are frequently the same, XORing those values 
            * will always give the same result (0) whereas the above will 
            * differentiate between them unless you're very unlucky.
        */
        int hashCode    = 23;
        hashCode        = hashCode * 37 + firstNameHashCode;
        hashCode        = hashCode * 37 + lastNameHashCode;
        hashCode        = hashCode * 37 + middleNameHashCode;

        return hashCode;
    }
    #endregion

    //=======================================================================================================
    //  INotifyPropertyChanged Implementation
    //=======================================================================================================
    #region PropertyChanged
    /// <summary>
    /// Occurs when a property value changes.
    /// </summary>
    /// <remarks>
    /// The <see cref="PropertyChanged"/> event can indicate all properties on the object have changed 
    /// by using either a <b>null</b> reference (Nothing in Visual Basic) or <see cref="String.Empty"/> 
    /// as the property name in the <see cref="PropertyChangedEventArgs"/>.
    /// </remarks>
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
    #endregion

    #region OnPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    /// <summary>
    /// Raises the <see cref="PropertyChanged"/> event.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="propertyName">The name of the property that changed.</param>
    protected void OnPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    {
        this.OnPropertyChanged(new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
    }
    #endregion

    #region OnPropertyChanged(PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    /// <summary>
    /// Raises the <see cref="PropertyChanged"/> event.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="e">A <see cref="PropertyChangedEventArgs"/> that contains the event data.</param>
    protected void OnPropertyChanged(PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = this.PropertyChanged;

        if (handler != null)
        {
            handler(this, e);
        }
    }
    #endregion
}

PropertyChangeMonitor class:

public class PropertyChangeMonitor
{
    //=======================================================================================================
    //  Constructors
    //=======================================================================================================
    #region PropertyChangeMonitor()
    public PropertyChangeMonitor()
    {

    }
    #endregion

    //=======================================================================================================
    //  Protected Properties
    //=======================================================================================================
    #region Sources
    protected ConcurrentDictionary<INotifyPropertyChanged, Action<string>> Sources
    {
        get
        {
            return _sources;
        }
    }
    private ConcurrentDictionary<INotifyPropertyChanged, Action<string>> _sources = new ConcurrentDictionary<INotifyPropertyChanged,Action<string>>();
    #endregion

    //=======================================================================================================
    //  Public Methods
    //=======================================================================================================
    #region Register(INotifyPropertyChanged source, Action<string> target)
    public void Register(INotifyPropertyChanged source, Action<string> target)
    {
        if(source == null || target == null)
        {
            return;
        }

        if(!this.Sources.ContainsKey(source))
        {
            if (this.Sources.TryAdd(source, target))
            {
                source.PropertyChanged += (o, e) =>
                {
                    target.Invoke(e.PropertyName);
                };
            }
        }
    }
    #endregion

    #region Unregister(INotifyPropertyChanged source, Action<string> target)
    public void Unregister(INotifyPropertyChanged source, Action<string> target)
    {
        if (source == null || target == null)
        {
            return;
        }

        if (this.Sources.ContainsKey(source))
        {
            if (this.Sources.TryRemove(source, out target))
            {
                source.PropertyChanged -= (o, e) =>
                {
                    target.Invoke(e.PropertyName);
                };
            }
        }
    }
    #endregion
}

Person class:

public class Person : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    //=======================================================================================================
    //  Constructors
    //=======================================================================================================
    #region Person()
    public Person()
    {
        this.ChangeMonitor.Register(this.Name, OnPropertyChanged);
    }
    #endregion

    //=======================================================================================================
    //  Protected Properties
    //=======================================================================================================
    #region ChangeMonitor
    protected PropertyChangeMonitor ChangeMonitor
    {
        get
        {
            return _monitor;
        }
    }
    private PropertyChangeMonitor _monitor = new PropertyChangeMonitor();
    #endregion

    //=======================================================================================================
    //  Public Properties
    //=======================================================================================================
    #region Name
    public FullName Name
    {
        get
        {
            return _personName;
        }

        set
        {
            if (!FullName.Equals(_personName, value))
            {
                _personName = value;
                this.OnPropertyChanged("Name");
            }
        }
    }
    private FullName _personName = new FullName();
    #endregion

    //=======================================================================================================
    //  INotifyPropertyChanged Implementation
    //=======================================================================================================
    #region PropertyChanged
    /// <summary>
    /// Occurs when a property value changes.
    /// </summary>
    /// <remarks>
    /// The <see cref="PropertyChanged"/> event can indicate all properties on the object have changed 
    /// by using either a <b>null</b> reference (Nothing in Visual Basic) or <see cref="String.Empty"/> 
    /// as the property name in the <see cref="PropertyChangedEventArgs"/>.
    /// </remarks>
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
    #endregion

    #region OnPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    /// <summary>
    /// Raises the <see cref="PropertyChanged"/> event.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="propertyName">The name of the property that changed.</param>
    protected void OnPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    {
        this.OnPropertyChanged(new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
    }
    #endregion

    #region OnPropertyChanged(PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    /// <summary>
    /// Raises the <see cref="PropertyChanged"/> event.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="e">A <see cref="PropertyChangedEventArgs"/> that contains the event data.</param>
    protected void OnPropertyChanged(PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = this.PropertyChanged;

        if (handler != null)
        {
            handler(this, e);
        }
    }
    #endregion
}

Note that in the constructor of Person, we register the Name property with the monitor and indicate that delegate method we wish to have executed whenever the PropertyChanged event is raised by the source being monitored for changes. If you have multiple properties you wish to monitor and raise a PropertyChanged event for, it becomes simple to add a single line of code that handles the wiring of the event notification.

This implementation should probably be modified to register and unregister with the monitor each time the Name property is changed within the Name property setter, but I think this gives you a gist of the idea.

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This is correct. But what if A has many children? Would it still be advisable? –  user542393 Dec 16 '10 at 18:56
    
You can aggregate the monitoring of one or more properties with the end result raising PropertyChanged for each property being monitored for changes. I believe this is a reasonable strategy base don what you have described. –  Oppositional Dec 16 '10 at 20:24
    
See code example I added to my original answer, hopefully this addresses your concerns and question. –  Oppositional Dec 16 '10 at 21:03

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