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Why can't I initialize readonly variables in a initializer? The following doesn't work as it should:

class Foo
{
    public readonly int bar;
}

new Foo { bar=0; }; // does not work

Is this due to some technical limits of the CLR?

EDIT

I know that new Foo { bar=0; } is the same as new Foo().bar=0;, but is "readonly" enforced by the CLR, or is it just a compiler limitation?

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3  
Following your latest edit, I have no idea what you're asking. Yes, readonly is enforced at run-time by the CLR. I don't see how it could be a compiler limitation. The other answers explain why what you're trying to do doesn't make any sense. – Cody Gray Dec 16 '10 at 19:09
    
@Cody Gray -- language restriction, not compiler limitation. The compiler just implements the language. – user166390 Dec 17 '10 at 1:40
    
@pst: Uh, I said "I don't see how it could be a compiler limitation." I agree with you. – Cody Gray Dec 17 '10 at 1:43
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Allowing a readonly to be set in an initializer introduces contradictions and complications that can't be enforced at compile-time. I imagine the restriction is to avoid ambiguity. The big key is compile-time validation.

Imagine this:

class Foo
{
    public readonly int bar;
    Foo () {
      // compiler can ensure that bar is set in an invoked ctor
      bar = 0;
    }
}

// compiler COULD know that `bar` was set in ctor
// and therefore this is invalid
new Foo { bar = 0; }

Now, consider:

class Foo
{
    public readonly int bar;
    Foo () {
      // imagine case where bar not set in ctor
    }
}

// compiler COULD know that `bar` is not bound yet
// therefore, this COULD be valid
new Foo { bar = 0; }

// but this COULD be proved to never be valid
new Foo();

Imagine that both of the above cases are unified (say, "by compiler magic"), however, enter in generics:

T G<T> () where T : new
{
  // What in heck should happen *at compile time*?
  // (Consider both cases above.)
  // What happens if T (Foo) changes to include/not-include setting the
  // readonly variable in the ctor?
  // Consider intermediate code that invokes G<Foo>() and this other
  // code is NOT recompiled even though Foo is--
  //   Yet a binary incompatibility has been added!
  //   No thanks!
  return new T();
}
G<Foo>();

I believe the cases I have outlined show some complications of using a "dynamic" readonly approach and, at the end of the day, I believe it is merely a chosen language restriction (compilers implement languages) to enforce/allow compile-time validation.

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The initializer is just syntactic sugar. When you write:

new Foo { bar=0; };

(Which, by the way, is a syntax error and should be this...)

new Foo { bar=0 }

what's actually happening is:

var x = new Foo();
x.bar = 0;

Since the property is read-only, that second statement is invalid.

Edit: Based on your edit, the question is a little unclear. A readonly property is, by design, not settable. It's built at object construction. This is enforced by both the compiler and the runtime. (Admittedly, I haven't tested the latter, since it would take some trickery to get around the former.)

Keep in mind that there are two stages of "compilation." It's enforced when compiling the C# code into IL code, and it's enforced when compiling the IL code into machine code.

It's not a technical limit of the CLR, and it's working exactly as it should, given the explicit readonly declaration. After the object is constructed, you can't set a readonly property.

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that was not the question – codymanix Dec 16 '10 at 19:00
1  
This answer just gets better and better. I've seen it twice now and gone to upvote it, when I realized I already had. – Cody Gray Dec 16 '10 at 20:20
    
@Cody Gray: Someone seems to disagree, there's a downvote. I'm pretty sure the question is a duplicate anyway, I think. It's hard to tell the intent of what's being asked. – David Dec 16 '10 at 21:33
    
There is no limitation if you use reflection, so e.g. typeof(Foo).GetField("bar").SetValue(oldFooInstance, 42); will change the value of the readonly field. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jun 22 '13 at 12:53
1  
Absolutely! And it will likely make the object malfunction since the authors of Foo did not expect you to do that. But maybe the asker was interested in this, as a comment to your great answer. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jun 22 '13 at 13:15

Since readonly variables must be initialized in constructor, and property initializers execute after the construction of object, that is not valid.

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Because an initializer is equivalent to

var foo = new Foo();
foo.bar=0;

It is a rewrite behind the scenes.

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Because you specified it is readonly. It does not make sense to specify that something is readonly then expect a write statement to work.

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What you're trying to do is this:

   class Foo
   {
        public readonly int bar;

        Foo(int b)
        {
             bar = b;  // readonly assignments only in constructor
        }
   }

   Foo x = new Foo(0);
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According to this page, the CLR default-constructs the object first before processing the initializer list, and you are therefore assigning to bar twice (once on default construction, once when the initializer is processed).

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This is a result of the implementation of the readonly keyword. The quote below is taken from the MSDN reference for readonly:

The readonly keyword is a modifier that you can use on fields. When a field declaration includes a readonly modifier, assignments to the fields introduced by the declaration can only occur as part of the declaration or in a constructor in the same class.

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