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Hello all I have a question relating to x86. In the Intel manual some instruction might take different types of memory operands. eg. IDIV r/m8 or IDIV r/m16 or IDIV r/m32 or IDIV r/m64 now they are all IDIV is there a possibility to know if the operand is m8, m16,m32 or m64? I was thinking if operand is m8 then it is addressed by an 8 bit register eg. ax if 32 then eax,esp... Is my assumption correct? Correct me if I'm wrong Any suggestions welcome Thanks

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2 Answers 2

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Yes, the register that is used as an operand resolves the ambiguity. (Note, however, that ax is a 16-bit register, not an 8-bit register -- that would be ah or al for the high or low byte, respectively.)

If you're only referring to memory operands, you need to use a BYTE PTR, WORD PTR or DWORD PTR specifier to resolve the ambiguity, like this:

mov dword ptr [eax], 0

This example sets the 32-bit quantity ("double word") at the address contained in eax to 0.

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thanks Martin. I just compiled a simple C code and got movl -8(%ebp), %eax cmpl -4(%ebp), %eax – is the "l" in the movl and cmpl the indicator you are talking about were l=long=32bit? if yes do you know the indicator for the byte, 2-byte and double word is? thanks –  Syntax_Error Dec 16 '10 at 19:47
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Anshuman has already answered this -- the difference is that AT&T syntax encodes the operand type in the instruction mnemonic (movb, movw or movl), whereas Intel syntax doesn't (mov). This is why Intel syntax sometimes requires a specifier such as dword ptr to resolve the ambiguity. –  Martin B Dec 17 '10 at 9:41
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  1. Whether the operand is m8, m16 or m32, the register used to address the memory location can be 8, 16 or 32 bits - all are valid afaik.

  2. To specify how many bits are to be read from memory, you need to use one of the size specifiers byte, word or dword before the address. For example:

idiv byte [bx] ; m8

idiv word [bx] ; m16

idiv dword [bx] ; m32

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thanks Anshuman. I just compiled a simple C code and got movl -8(%ebp), %eax cmpl -4(%ebp), %eax – is the "l" in the movl and cmpl the indicator you are talking about were l=long=32bit? if yes do you know the indicator for the byte, 2-byte and double word is? thanks –  Syntax_Error Dec 16 '10 at 19:47
    
Yes - byte is b, word is w, and long (double word) is l. This is the AT&T syntax for mnemonics. (I had used the Intel syntax in my examples) –  Anshuman Fotedar Dec 16 '10 at 20:12
    
okey so if I am using a dissambler to generate the assembly, would the generated assembly be Intel or AT&T syntax? or is it also dependent on the dissambler I use? –  Syntax_Error Dec 16 '10 at 21:50
    
Most disassemblers can be configured to produce one particular syntax. With gdb's disassemble you can use set disassembly-flavor att or set disassembly-flavor intel. –  Anshuman Fotedar Dec 17 '10 at 4:13
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