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I'm developing an application at work using C++, Qt, Mingw32 and Netbeans. I need to use an in house API that has been developed by the software group in the company. I have the symbol libraries .lib files for the DLLs i need to link against, but i cannot use these libs with Mingw32, it works fine with Microsoft Visual Studio.

Does anyone know if there is a way to export the symbols and create a .a symbol library that works with Mingw32 ? If not i'll have to go over to Visual Studio i guess.

I have tried using the program "pexports" to create a .def file and dlltool, but that didn't work. Still got unreferenced symbol errors, then i added the symbols it complained about to the .def, because they weren't there and it stopped complaining and compiled. But the program crashes. I tried the same code in Visual Studio and it compiles and runs fine.

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5 Answers 5

Have you considered dynamically loading the DLL? LoadLibrary, GetProcAddress, etc. You can probably easily write a class that encapsulates all the DLL's entry points, loading and unloading the library, and does all the #typedefs, etc. It's grunt work but if it's an in-house library there probably aren't too many entry points?

Import libs are overrated. :p

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Will this work for classes also ? There arent to many entry points i think. –  oddi Dec 16 '10 at 19:14
    
@oddi No, it will not. Functions only. –  karlphillip Dec 16 '10 at 19:26
    
thought so, think i will try the reimp utility tomorrow and see if that can convert the .lib to .a correctly –  oddi Dec 16 '10 at 19:34
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I'm sure you could get C++ classes to work too but it'd be messy, and that's an understatement. Dynamically loading DLLs that expose C++ classes is typically done with two helper exports... one to create an instance of the class and one to delete it. If you can't get your company's team to add this for you (it's two one-line functions after all that are exported as extern "C") then I'm afraid it's either trying to fix the implib or mucking around with the mangled function names for the C++ methods. –  martona Dec 16 '10 at 19:42

Not sure if it helps, but you may wish to check this guide.

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Here's how I did that for the mysql library.

Create a list of exports using dllwrap:

dllwrap --export-all-symbols --output-def libmysql.def libmysql.dll --implib liblibmysql.a

This creates a list of exports in the .def file but the name mangling is incorrect. Edit the .def file in a text editor and remove the '@' symbols. The symbol names typically also have a number appended to them as well. I don't know how to determine the correct name except by experimentation:

Run the following to create a netbeans compatible library:

dlltool --input-def libmySQL.def --dllname libmySQL.dll --output-lib libMySQLclient.a -k

Compile with it and you'll get undefined symbols. The undefined symbols will have the correct decorations. Edit the .def file again and correct the symbol names. Re-run dlltool to get the correct .a library file.

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Have you tried linking the DLL directly, rather than a .a/.lib? MinGW is usually happy to do that for you.

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how do i do that? –  oddi Dec 17 '10 at 11:15
    
@oddi. I'm not familiar with how you would configure it from inside netbeans, but you should just link the .dll in the same way you would normally link a shared/static library. –  Mark H Dec 17 '10 at 12:57
    
ok, i understand –  oddi Dec 17 '10 at 13:43

I give up, some people say it is not possible with a dll compiled on microsofts compiler with c++ exports, because of the name mangling

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