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The randint(a,b) function from Python's random module returns a "random" integer in the range from a to b, including both end point. Fill in the blanks in the function below that creates and returns a random string of 0's and 1s of length n.

from random import randint:
def randString01(n):
    _________________
    _________________
    for count in range(n):
        __________________
    return________________

(Ed: The : at the end of the import statement doesn't belong; it's as presented in the original question, however.)

...so far i found out how to make n into a string of the length of n(so a string of n n's) I want to know where would the randint apply? So far i have

from random import randint
def randString01(num): 
    x = str() 
    count = num 
    while count >0: 
        if randint(0,1) == 0: 
            append.x(0)   
        else: 
            append.x(1) 
        count -= 1
    x=str(x) 
    return x

but it doesnt work. What should I fix?

share|improve this question
    
What have you tried so far? –  John La Rooy Dec 17 '10 at 2:29
    
Show us your code that you've tried, not your teacher's code. What does this code have anything to do with making 'n into a string of length n'? –  Falmarri Dec 17 '10 at 2:30
    
@gnibbler: AFAICT, the problem was presented by the OP as stated in their own homework sheet. I don't think it should be amended. –  Marcelo Cantos Dec 17 '10 at 2:32
3  
Will people please stop down-voting? The OP hasn't asked to be spoon-fed. –  Marcelo Cantos Dec 17 '10 at 2:35
    
Well in the end i want a random string of 0's and 1's that has a lenght of n characters, so i thought i would have to make a program that first makes n into a string of n characters and then use the randint operation to convert the characters into 0s and 1s –  Ronnie Dec 17 '10 at 2:43

4 Answers 4

Since this is homework, I won't give you the answer, but here are some leading questions:

  • How would you use randint(a,b) to give you either 0 or 1?
  • How do you convert an integer to a string?
  • How can you build up a string with a for loop?

If you can answer those, you've solved the problem.

share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate you trying to help me. Can you tell me if i am on the right start. For the first blank i put n=n*str(n) to give me the n n's –  Ronnie Dec 17 '10 at 2:34
    
and for the record its not homework its a in-class project but none of my classmates are able to figure it out so i turned to this helpful website –  Ronnie Dec 17 '10 at 2:35
1  
Ronnie: Not quite - you do not want a string of N "n"s, you want a string of N "0" or "1"s. The N is simply a count, not something that must literally be there. –  Yann Ramin Dec 17 '10 at 2:42
    
I see...thank you i believe the psuedocode from above is what i needed. The only difference its that the wording in which sage uses it is different. for example while count is greater than zero would be while count >0:. –  Ronnie Dec 17 '10 at 2:50

Inside the for-loop.

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Thank you very much –  Ronnie Dec 17 '10 at 2:36

Since it's clearly classwork, here's some pseudo-code to start with:

define randString01(num):
    set str to ""
    count = num
    while count is greater than zero:
        if randint(0,1) is zero:
            append "0" to str
        else:
            append "1" to str
        subtract one from count
    return str

Your string of n occurences of the character n will not help here by the way. It will either give you a zero-sized "0" string or a one-sized "1" string. In other words, all ones.


Okay, what you have in your comment seems okay (at least in structure):

from random import randint
def randString01(num):
    x = str()                       ## <-- ???
    count = num
    while count > 0:
        if randint(0,1) == 0:
            append.x(0)             ## <-- ???
        else:
            append.x(1)             ## <-- ???
        count -= 1
    x = str(x)                      ## <-- ???
    return x

but I'm just a little uncertain about your str() and append() lines. Since you've done the bulk of the work, here are my minor changes to get this going under Python:

from random import randint
def randString01(num):
    x = ""
    count = num
    while count > 0:
        if randint(0,1) == 0:
            x = x + "0"
        else:
            x = x + "1"
        count -= 1
    return x

print randString01(7)               ## And add these to call the function.
print randString01(7)
print randString01(9)
print randString01(9)

This outputs:

1011000
1010011
110001000
110101001
share|improve this answer
    
Hey thank you i greatly appreciate it, my entire class is having difficulty answering theses questions –  Ronnie Dec 17 '10 at 2:39
    
By any chance do you know how to use the append operator in sage? –  Ronnie Dec 17 '10 at 2:54
    
x = "abc", x = x + "def" will give you x of "abcdef" in Python. I haven't use sage but it looks like it's Pythonesque. –  paxdiablo Dec 17 '10 at 3:05
    
I believe so, so so far i have from random import randint def randString01(num): x = str() count = num while count >0: if randint(0,1) == 0: append.x(0) else: append.x(1) count -= 1 x=str(x) return x but it doesnt work. do you see anything i should fix? –  Ronnie Dec 17 '10 at 3:12
    
I put it on the original question but it came out in one block. –  Ronnie Dec 17 '10 at 3:15

if you don't have to use the exact syntax above, this can be accomplished with 1 line of code.

concepts:

string.join takes an iterable you can create an iterable of random string by inlining the for loop in to a list comprehension

the resulting code is as follows.

''.join([str(random.randint(0,1)) for i in range(n)])
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm when I use it in sage i get a syntax error:'function' object has no attribute 'randint' –  Ronnie Dec 17 '10 at 3:19

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