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Can someone explain the output of calling mystery(root) on the binary tree below?

struct treenode {
  int data;
  struct treenode* left;
  struct treenode* right;
}

void mystery(struct treenode* root) {
  if (root == NULL) return;
  mystery(root->right);
  printf("%d ", root->data%25);
  mystery(root->left);
}

Tree:

       35
    /      \
  23       17
 /  \     /
89  135  56
        /   \
       44    89
              \
              74
             /
            287     
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2  
Why don't you take out the %25 and see if the output is the node values in the order you expect? –  sje397 Dec 17 '10 at 2:54
    
You should try to run it and verify your results. Hint: this a modification of a tree traversal program (one of inorder, postorder or preorder). –  Sanjit Saluja Dec 17 '10 at 3:01
    
Compiling and running it (also making small changes) would help you learn better than asking the community here. –  ThisIsMeMoony Dec 17 '10 at 9:07

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

See below trace:

You call mystery(35)
the root is not null which calls mystery(17)
    mystery(17) is not null and calls mystery(17-Right)
        This is null so it Returns
    printf(17%25 == 17)
    call mystery(56)
        mystery(56) is not null and calls mystery(89)
            mystery(89) is not null and calls mystery(74)
                    mystery(74) is not null and calls mystery(74-Right)
                    mystery(74-Right) is null; return;
                printf(74%25 == 24)
                mystery(74) calls mystery(287)
                    printf(287%25 == 12)
                printf(89%25 == 14)
        printf(56%25 == 6)
        mystery(56) calls mystery(44)
                mystery(44) has no right or left child
                printf(44%25 == 19)
printf(35%25 == 10)
root calls mystery(23)
    mystery(23) calls mystery(135)
        printf(135%25 == 10)
    printf(23%25 == 23)
    mystery(23) calls mystery(89)
        printf(89%25 == 14)
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how do you know when to call mystery(right)? –  kachilous Dec 17 '10 at 3:38
    
Plz Clarify a bit more your question. What do you mean/ –  GeorgeAl Dec 17 '10 at 3:40
    
I guess here's my version of the call stack: call mystery(35) since root is not null call mystery(35-Right) print 17%25 = 17. Then mystery(17-left), which is 56. Then call mystery(56-right) print 89%25. Then call mystery(89-left) that's null so call mystery(89-right). print 74%25 then call mystery(74-left) etc... –  kachilous Dec 17 '10 at 3:41
    
Mystery(89) has a right child which is 74 according to your diagram –  GeorgeAl Dec 17 '10 at 3:49
1  
Treat each recursive call as if for the first time getting called, forget about previous data and info you have in your brain, but also try to remember them at the same, when you return from the call, to the previous call. :) –  GeorgeAl Dec 17 '10 at 4:07

I think it would be 17 24 12 14 6 19 10 10 23 14

Edit: fixed spacing.

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Need a space in 146. –  Swiss Dec 17 '10 at 3:03

It is not correct. This traversal is called inorder The first 17 is correct since 17%25=17 next it should be 24 since 74%25=24

It seems like the function is ok maybe the depicted tree is nor right.

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@ruslik Postorder means you first visit left and right and then the actual node. It is symmetric which means you can do right left and then the actual node. –  Enrique Dec 17 '10 at 3:02
    
right. Just that inorder parses it in ascending order, and his one in descending, so I thought it whould be the inverse of inorder. –  ruslik Dec 17 '10 at 3:03
    
@ruslik the output of Krysten's function is not in descending order. Notice the % operator –  Enrique Dec 17 '10 at 3:05
    
And the tree is not sorted. However, I meant the order the nodes are parsed. There should be a forth type: ~inorder :) –  ruslik Dec 17 '10 at 3:06

17,24,12,14,6,19,10,10,23,14 is correct output

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This is really a comment, not an answer to the question. Please use "add comment" to leave feedback for the author. –  Conner Aug 18 '12 at 1:40

No, this function can't provide such result on this tree. 17 24 12 14 6 19 10 10 23 14

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Using the following code I get:

17 24 12 14 6 19 10 10 23 14

void makenode(struct treenode **n, int val) {
    *n = malloc(sizeof(struct treenode));
    (*n)->left = (*n)->right = 0;
    (*n)->data = val;
}

int main() {
    struct treenode *root;
    makenode(&root, 35);
    makenode(&root->left, 23);
    makenode(&root->right, 17);
    makenode(&root->left->left, 89);
    makenode(&root->left->right, 135);

    makenode(&root->right->left, 56);
    makenode(&root->right->left->left, 44);
    makenode(&root->right->left->right, 89);

    makenode(&root->right->left->right->right, 74);
    makenode(&root->right->left->right->right->left, 287);

    mystery(root);
    return 0;
}
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