Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hello I have gotten a program that gives an output of a random series of 0s and 1s of length n. However, there is a slight problem in my program because I get syntax error. I am using Sage. What should I fix?

from random import randint
def randString01(num):
    x = str() 
    count = num 
    while count >0: 
        if randint(0,1) == 0: 
            append.x(0)   
        else: 
            append.x(1) 
        count -= 1
    x=str(x) 
    return x
share|improve this question
    
Post your syntax error so we know what's going on. –  ajwood Dec 17 '10 at 3:25
    
um global name append is not defined....how would i add the 0s and 1s to x? –  Ronnie Dec 17 '10 at 3:26
    
That's not a syntax error. In general it's a good idea to copy and paste your exact error message. –  Laurence Gonsalves Dec 17 '10 at 3:29
    
How is this question different form this question by the same author? stackoverflow.com/questions/4467182/… –  John Dec 17 '10 at 3:45
    
Ronnie - in the future you should really make your question title much more specific. You should also check the box next to the best answer in order to accept it and give the author credit –  I82Much Dec 17 '10 at 3:52

3 Answers 3

as others noted, you shouldn't use 'append'

from random import randint
def randString01(num):
    x = str() 
    count = num 
    while count >0: 
        if randint(0,1) == 0: 
            x += "0"   
        else: 
            x += "1" 
        count -= 1
    x=str(x) 
    return x

Second, this is not pythonic at all. You should look into list comprehensions.

def randString01(num):
    return ''.join([str(randint(0,1)) for x in range(num)])

Sample usage:

>>> randString01(5)
'01101'
>>> randString01(100)
'0110101001101001000110101100101100100100110001011111111101101010010011110000000
101010011001000000000'

To break this into simpler pieces, I'll illustrate each piece.

str.join

str.join(iterable)¶ Return a string which is the concatenation of the strings in the iterable iterable. The separator between elements is the string providing this method.

>>> ",".join(["Beans","Eggs","Bacon"])
'Beans,Eggs,Bacon'

I use this command with the empty string to paste together all my numerical values

range

>>> range(5)
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4]
>>> range(100)
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 2
2, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 4
2, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 6
2, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 8
2, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99]

I use range to make sure my inner loop repeats the correct number of times

list comprehension

>>> [x for x in [1,2,3]]
[1, 2, 3]
>>> [2*x for x in [1,2,3]]
[2, 4, 6]
>>> [str(x) for x in [1,2,3]]
['1', '2', '3']
>>> [str(5) for x in range(5)]
['5', '5', '5', '5', '5']
>>> [str(randint(0,1)) for x in range(5)]
['1', '0', '0', '1', '1']

Note that I call str(randint(0,1)) to ensure that the values in my list are string elements, rather than integers. If you try to call str.join(a list of numbers), you'll get an error:

>>> ''.join[1,2,3]
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<input>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: 'builtin_function_or_method' object is unsubscriptable

So tying it together, the piece in brackets creates a list of string elements, either ones or zeros. The ''.join(list) concatenates each digit to the next, forming a single string.

EDIT:

Thanks to TokenMacGuy in the comments who points out that the list creation is unnecessary. It is sufficient to define randString01 as

def randString01(num):
    return ''.join(str(randint(0,1)) for x in range(num))

This is because the generator object returned by the argument to join is iterable, and all the str.join method needs to work is an iterable object. It is better to use the generator than the list because it allows lazy evaluation, which isn't a big deal in this case, but it could be if the list were exceptionally large. See the PEP 289 page for more on generators.

This is some pretty advanced stuff, but please don't be scared off of python by this example. See how beautiful the code can be (a single line as opposed to ~10), when you can use very high level abstractions rather than low level control structures.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 pythonic ... This is some more text because +1 pythonic is too short apparently. –  SingleNegationElimination Dec 17 '10 at 3:33
    
You actually don't need the list comprehension, though. join will iterate over any sequence, like a generator expression! –  SingleNegationElimination Dec 17 '10 at 3:34
    
def randString01(num): return ''.join(str(randint(0,1)) for x in range(num)) I like it. –  jgritty Dec 17 '10 at 3:39
    
hey thanks Token - I didn't realize that the list creation is unnecessary. That's awesome. –  I82Much Dec 17 '10 at 3:42

You are trying to use the append method of a list, on a string.

First, strings have no append method.

Second, you would need to write x.append("0").*

And last (since strings have no append method), what you want to write is x+="0", or x = x+"0".

Also, you don't need that final x=str(x) since x is already a string.

*In python, to call the method of an object, the syntax is object.methodname(args),

share|improve this answer
    
you sir are a lifesaver –  Ronnie Dec 17 '10 at 3:29

I think you want something more like this:

def randString01(length):
    my_string = ""
    for count in range(length):
        my_string += str(randint(0,1))
    return my_string
share|improve this answer
    
Ha wow thats exactly what i wanted thank you so much –  Ronnie Dec 17 '10 at 3:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.