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According to Google Calculator (-13) % 64 is 51.

According to Javascript (see this JSBin: http://jsbin.com/uzake5/2/edit) it is -13.

How do I fix this?

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This may just be a precedence issue. Do you mean (-13) % 64 or -(13 % 64)? Personally, I'd put in the parens either way, just for extra clarity. –  MatrixFrog Dec 17 '10 at 3:59
    
edited, thanks. –  Alec Gorge Dec 17 '10 at 4:05
1  
essentially a duplicate of How does java do modulus calculations with negative numbers? even though this is a javascript question. –  GregS Dec 18 '10 at 0:22
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8 Answers

up vote 66 down vote accepted
Number.prototype.mod = function(n) {
return ((this%n)+n)%n;
}

Taken from this article: The JavaScript Modulo Bug

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5  
I don't know that I would call it a "bug". The modulo operation is not very well defined over negative numbers, and different computing environments handle it differently. Wikipedia's article on the modulo operation covers it pretty well. –  Daniel Pryden Dec 17 '10 at 4:08
    
It may seems dumb since it is often called 'modulo', suggesting it would behave the same as its mathematics definition (see ℤ/nℤ algebra), which it does not. –  etienne Apr 25 '13 at 16:41
1  
Why take the modulo before adding n? Why not just add n and then take the modulo? –  starwed Nov 26 '13 at 22:34
1  
@starwed if you didn't use this%n it would fail for x < -n - e.g. (-7 + 5) % 5 === -2 but ((-7 % 5) + 5) % 5 == 3. –  chrisdew Feb 6 at 21:58
1  
@NoBugs - Nobody said it was defined by default. The code in this answer is what defines it. Having run that code you can then say (-13).mod(64) and get 51. jsfiddle.net/63KyC –  nnnnnn yesterday
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Using Number.prototype is SLOW, because each time you use the prototype method your number is wrapped in an Object. Instead of this:

Number.prototype.mod = function (n) {
        return ((this % n) + n) % n;
}

Use:

function mod(n, m) {
        return ((m % n) + n) % n;
}

http://jsperf.com/negative-modulo/2

~97% faster than using prototype. If performance is of importance to you of course..

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1  
Great tip. I took your jsperf and compared with the rest of the solutions in this question (but it seems this is the best anyway): jsperf.com/negative-modulo/3 –  Protron Oct 12 '13 at 14:16
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The % operator in JavaScript is the remainder operator, not the modulo operator (the main difference being in how negative numbers are treated):

-1 % 8 // -1, not 7

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It should be called the remainder operator but it is called modulus operator: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Guide/… –  Koveras Oct 21 '13 at 22:54
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Though it isn't behaving as you expected, it doesn't mean that JavaScript is not 'behaving'. It is a choice JavaScript made for its modulo calculation. Because, by definition either answer makes sense.

See this from Wikipedia. You can see on the right how different languages chose the result's sign.

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Funny that the language refs themselves call it the 'modulus assignment operator'.

MSDN: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ie/9f59bza0(v=vs.94).aspx

Mozilla: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/Operators/Arithmetic_Operators#.25_.28Modulus.29

Anyway here is a tutorial with a "mod" function to return a positive result.

var mod = function (n, m) {
    var remain = n % m;
    return Math.floor(remain >= 0 ? remain : remain + m);
};
mod(5,22)   // 5
mod(25,22)  // 3
mod(-1,22)  // 21
mod(-2,22)  // 20
mod(0,22)   // 0
mod(-1,22)  // 21
mod(-21,22) // 1

And of course

mod(-13,64) // 51
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The accepted answer makes me a little nervous because it re-uses the % operator. What if Javascript changes the behavior in the future?

Here is a workaround that does not re-use %:

function mod(a, n) {
    return a - (n * Math.floor(a/n));
}

mod(1,64); // 1
mod(63,64); // 63
mod(64,64); // 0
mod(65,64); // 1
mod(0,64); // 0
mod(-1,64); // 63
mod(-13,64); // 51
mod(-63,64); // 1
mod(-64,64); // 0
mod(-65,64); // 63
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1  
If javascript changed the modulo operator to match the mathematical definition, the accepted answer would still work. –  starwed Nov 26 '13 at 22:33
    
"What if Javascript changes the behavior in the future?" - Why would it? Changing the behaviour of such a fundamental operator is not likely. –  nnnnnn 2 days ago
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This is not a bug, there's 3 fonctions to calculate modulo, you can use the one which fit your needs (I would recommand to use Euclidean function)

Truncating the decimal part function

console.log(  41 %  7 ); //  6
console.log( -41 %  7 ); // -6
console.log( -41 % -7 ); // -6
console.log(  41 % -7 ); //  6

Integer part function

Number.prototype.mod = function(n) {
    return ((this%n)+n)%n;
};

console.log( parseInt( 41).mod( 7) ); //  6
console.log( parseInt(-41).mod( 7) ); //  1
console.log( parseInt(-41).mod(-7) ); // -6
console.log( parseInt( 41).mod(-7) ); // -1

Euclidean function

Number.prototype.mod = function(n) {
    var m = ((this%n)+n)%n;
    return m < 0 ? m + Math.abs(n) : m;
};

console.log( parseInt( 41).mod( 7) ); // 6
console.log( parseInt(-41).mod( 7) ); // 1
console.log( parseInt(-41).mod(-7) ); // 1
console.log( parseInt( 41).mod(-7) ); // 6
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So it seems that if you're trying to mod around degrees (so that if you have -50 degrees - 200 degrees), you'd want to use something like:

function modrad(m) {
    return ((((180+m) % 360) + 360) % 360)-180;
}
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