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Given the following recursive function, what would be printed by mysterious(4)?

void mysterious(int x) {
    if (x == 0) return;
    printf(“%d ”, x);
    mysterious(x-1);
    mysterious(x-1);
}

Here is my call stack:

mysterious(4) => print 4
mysterious(3) => print 3
mysterious(2) => print 2
mysterious(1) => print 1
mysterious(0) => print 0

Is this correct?

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6  
Somebody uses the function name mysterious in all their exam questions? :) –  sje397 Dec 17 '10 at 4:58
1  
sorry, time for you to do them yourself –  KevinDTimm Dec 17 '10 at 5:01
    
And what's so mysterious about it? Is compiling and running it more difficult than posting on SO? –  ruslik Dec 17 '10 at 5:08
1  
OP has stated in comments that it's not homework and, anyway, homework is a meta-tag that adds nothing to the question. If questioners want help rather than answers, they will ask for help. On top of that, I'm voting this up since (1) OP at least had a crack at it first; (2) it is useful in understanding recursion and clear in intent; and (3) I like annoying drive-by downvoters :-) –  paxdiablo Dec 17 '10 at 5:21
    
@paxdiablo thanks –  kachilous Dec 17 '10 at 5:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Why don't you just type it in to an editor in your language of choice, compile it and run? I chose Java but that's just because I'm between CygWin installs on my box at the moment - I'd much rather be using C :-)

public class testprog {
    public static void mysterious(int x) {
        if (x == 0) return;
        System.out.print(x + " ");
        mysterious(x-1);
        mysterious(x-1);
    }
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        mysterious(4);
    }
}

This outputs the numbers:

4 3 2 1 1 2 1 1 3 2 1 1 2 1 1

Basically, what's happening is that, at each level, you print out the number then call the next level twice with the next lowest number (unless it's reached zero).

Aside: technically, you do call the next layer with zero but, since it returns straight away, it has no affect on the output.

The following diagram will hopefully illustrate this better, with different symbols representing different layers:

(4) (-------------------------------) (-------------------------------)
     {3} {-----------} {-----------}   {3} {-----------} {-----------}
          [2] [1] [1]   [2] [1] [1]         [2] [1] [1]   [2] [1] [1]
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That makes a lot of sense. So essentially, it's the double mysterious(x-1) that causes the next lowest number to be called twice? –  kachilous Dec 17 '10 at 5:20
    
Yes, got it in one! –  paxdiablo Dec 17 '10 at 5:26

Because every function call makes 2 function calls in turn, you can visualize your recursion as a "tree" so to speak, and you are doing a preorder traversal on the tree.

It would look something like this:

                           4
                           |
                3----------+----------3
                |                     |
           2----+----2           2----+----2
           |         |           |         |
        1--+--1   1--+--1     1--+--1   1--+--1

The order of execution that you have is:

  • print the number
  • call the function with x-1
  • call the function with x-1 again

This would correspond to our "tree visualization" by doing:

  • print the root
  • traverse the left node
  • traverse the right node

The output would be:

    4 3 2 1 1 2 1 1 3 2 1 1 2 1 1
share|improve this answer
    
That's what I had thought. Would it actually not print all of these on a single line with one space between each number? There are no new line \n characters in the print statement... That's what I thought would happen - but I don't work with C much. –  jeremysawesome Dec 17 '10 at 5:07
    
@jeremyawesome, very observant :). I changed the output. –  Stargazer712 Dec 17 '10 at 5:15

No, it will be

mysterious(4) => print 4
mysterious(3) => print 3
mysterious(2) => print 2
mysterious(1) => print 1
mysterious(1) => print 1
mysterious(2) => print 2
mysterious(1) => print 1
mysterious(1) => print 1
mysterious(3) => print 3
mysterious(2) => print 2
mysterious(1) => print 1
mysterious(1) => print 1
mysterious(2) => print 2
mysterious(1) => print 1
mysterious(1) => print 1

because 0 will cause the function to return earlier and because of that double-call.

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No. It won't print 0 cause when x==0 it will return

Also, since you have

mysterious(x-1);
mysterious(x-1);

it will print (Fixed)

4 3 2 1 1 2 1 1 3 2 1 1 2 1 1

mysterious(x-1); doesnt change the value of x. it just calls mysterious() again, this time with the value x-1

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what does "return;" mean? I'm not used to seeing return without a statement following it. –  kachilous Dec 17 '10 at 4:58
    
when in a void function (a function which does not return a value) using return means exit the function and return to the callee –  GeorgeAl Dec 17 '10 at 4:59
2  
4 3 2 1 1 2 1 1 3 2 1 1 2 1 1 - 4 only once and then branches out for each successive call –  Peter Gibson Dec 17 '10 at 5:00
1  
Wrong, that double-call is inside the function. –  thejh Dec 17 '10 at 5:00
    
@Peter,@thejh. Correct. Will fix. –  GeorgeAl Dec 17 '10 at 5:01

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