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I had a problem with the Django tutorial so I asked a question here. No-one knew the answer, but I eventually figured it out with help from Robert. Python seems to be treating import datetime the same as from datetime import *.

Working code:

import datetime
from django.db import models

class Poll(models.Model):
    question = models.CharField(max_length=200)
    pub_date = models.DateTimeField('date published')
    def __unicode__(self):
        return self.question

    def was_published_today(self):
        return self.pub_date.date() == date.today()

Not working code: (The only differences are the import statements and the last line.)

from django.db import models
import datetime

class Poll(models.Model):
    question = models.CharField(max_length=200)
    pub_date = models.DateTimeField('date published')
    def __unicode__(self):
        return self.question

    def was_published_today(self):
        return (self.pub_date() == datetime.date.today())

EDIT: I guess I wasn't clear enough. The code produces the exact same traceback with the last line being return (self.pub_date.date() == datetime.date.today()) Me originally forgetting to add .date() is NOT the error I'm asking about.

The traceback produced by the not working code:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<console>", line 1, in <module>
  File "/myDir/mySite/polls/models.py", line 11, in was_published_today
    return (self.pub_date() == datetime.date.today())
TypeError: 'datetime.datetime' object is not callable

Why on earth is it doing this?

My question is NOT about forgetting .date(). My question is: Why is datetime in my namespace without me using from datetime import *.

Note: The first question asked what it was doing. This question asks why.

UPDATE: Suddenly it works. With datetime.date.today() AND date.today(). My question remains though, why does date.today() work? It seems datetime is in my local namespace without me putting there. Why?

share|improve this question
2  
Your Python installation must be seriously messed up. –  Chris Morgan Dec 17 '10 at 6:30
    
Shouldn't self.pub_date() in the second case be self.pub_date.date(), just like in the first case? –  Alok Singhal Dec 17 '10 at 6:31
1  
That's really odd. Works normally when I just do import datetime; datetime.date.today() with none of the Django stuff. –  Rafe Kettler Dec 17 '10 at 6:31
    
I guess self.pub_date is not callable. –  Kabie Dec 17 '10 at 6:31
    
@Alok: That's one reason that's the code that doesn't work. –  John Dec 17 '10 at 6:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As we discussed in the comments, the problem is not with the code, but the way you are updating the source. python caches modules in sys.modules. You can reload individual modules using the reload function, but for many changes it's best to reload the entire shell. In many cases it looked as though the changes had propagated because the error messages seemed to have changed, this is because python doesn't cache the source code of the file, so when it references code, it shows you the newest version. Hopefully now, you can apply the other answers with more success.

share|improve this answer
    
Yep, they work now. Thanks again! –  John Dec 19 '10 at 23:06

The problem in the latter snippet is with this part of your code:

return (self.pub_date() == datetime.date.today())

self.pub_date contains a datetime.datetime instance. It's not callable like that. For example:

>>> import datetime
>>> d = datetime.datetime.now()
>>> d()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: 'datetime.datetime' object is not callable
>>>

If you want to compare only the date, you should call it thus:

return (self.pub_date.date() == datetime.date.today())
share|improve this answer
    
Yet another problem that would be solved by diff –  Rafe Kettler Dec 17 '10 at 6:36
1  
Take a look at the other question. He got an error on that, but if you remove datetime from the second half of the == he's OK. The question isn't the pub_date.date() (although he has a typo in the question) but why datetime seems to be poisoning his namespace without using a from. –  Robert Dec 17 '10 at 6:37
    
I already tried that. I covered that in the answer to the other question. return (self.pub_date.date() == datetime.date.today()) does not work! –  John Dec 17 '10 at 6:38

"My question is: Why is datetime in my namespace without me using from datetime import *."

Because you did import datetime. Then you have datetime in your namespace. Not the CLASS datetime, but the MODULE.

Python does not treat import datetime the same way as from datetime import *. Stop asking why it does that, when it does not.

>>> import datetime
>>> date.today()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
NameError: name 'date' is not defined
>>> 

There is something else happening. If it's Django magic or not, I don't know. I don't have a Django installation where I can try this at the moment. (If there is a super-quick way of making that happen, tell me. easy_installing Django wasn't enough. :) )

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I know Python shouldn't treat them the same but I looks to me like it is. I also think something else is happening, but what? –  John Dec 17 '10 at 18:13
    
@John: That's probably trivially easy to figure out by sticking a pdb in the code. But I can't do that, as I don't know how to make the code example actually runnable, since I haven't used Django for two years. :-) I'm guessing Django magically craps all over your locals() but that's just a wild guess. –  Lennart Regebro Dec 17 '10 at 18:26
    
@Lennart: The output of that is here: pastebin.com/2eRuxajV Unfortunately, I don't understand what that output means. I'm not sure I did that right, that was my first time ever using pdb. –  John Dec 17 '10 at 18:34
    
I should probably add that import polls.models works fine in the interpreter. –  John Dec 17 '10 at 18:47
    
@John: Just before the line where the error happens, stick import pdb;pdb.set_trace(). Then you'll be able to inspect local variables and step into the methods, etc. –  Lennart Regebro Dec 17 '10 at 19:04

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