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I'm not sure where this points in JavaScript. And I give 2 examples.

Can you help me analyze them? Thank you very much.

//exmp1
function f1()
{
  alert(this);
  function f2()
  {
    alert(this);
  }
  f2();
}
f1();

//exmp2
var jsn = 
{
  name : "b",
  func : function() // closure
  {
    alert(this); 
    return function()
    {
      return this;
    }
  }
}

alert(jsn.func()());
share|improve this question
1  
Off-topic: Your jsn varname suggests that you're thinking in terms of JSON. But that's not JSON, that's JavaScript Object Literal Notation. (JSON is a subset of object literal notation; it requires double quotes and doesn't have functions or undefined, and only supports decimal [not hex or octal].) People confuse the two a lot :-) so I thought it worth mentioning. –  T.J. Crowder Dec 17 '10 at 8:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

this is different in JavaScript than it is in some other languages like C++ or Java. The value of this in your first example will always be the global object (window, on browsers). this in your second example is the jsn object for the first alert, and window for the second. This is because this is determined entirely by how a function is called, not where it's defined.

If you don't do anything special when calling the function, this is the global object. When you call a function via an object property (jsn.func()), this is set to the object the property came from. (But don't get the wrong impression, func is in no way specially tied to jsn; JavaScript doesn't have methods, just functions; details.) f1 then returns a function, which is called within the final alert; since that call is not via an object property, this is set to the global object.

Some examples:

// Simple function
function foo() {
    alert(this === window);
}
foo(); // true, within the call, `this` === `window`

// Object example, and twist at the end
var obj = {
    func: function() {
        alert(this === obj);
    },
};
obj.func();    // true, within the call, `this` === `obj`
obj["func"](); // true, within the call, `this` === `obj`

var f = obj.func; // Not calling it, just getting a reference to the function
f(); // false, within the call `this` !== `obj` (`this` === `window`)

// Creating functions on the fly, returning them, and how that has
// nothing whatsoever to do with how `this` gets set:
var obj = {
    func: function() {
        return function() {
            alert("I'm a generated function");
            alert(this === obj);
        };
     }
};
obj.func()(); // alerts the "I'm a generated function", then false; `this` !== `obj`
obj.bar = obj.func();
obj.bar();    // alerts the "I'm a generated function", then true; `this` === `obj`

There's a second way to control what this is within a function: Use the .call or .apply features of JavaScript functions:

var obj = {
    func: function() {
        alert(this === obj);
    }
};
function foo(a, b) {
    alert(this === obj); // Yes, really obj; see below
    alert(a);
    alert(b);
}
foo(1, 2);               // alerts false (`this` !== `obj`), then 1, then 2
obj.func();              // alerts true, `this` === `obj`
foo.call(obj, 3, 4);     // alerts true (`this` === `obj`), then 3, then 4
foo.apply(obj, [5, 6]);  // alerts true (`this` === `obj`), then 5, then 6

As you can see, the first argument to call or apply is the object to make this within the function call. The only difference between call and apply is how you specify arguments to pass into the target function: With call, you just supply them after the first argument; with apply, you supply them as an array.

And finally, there's a third way: The new keyword. JavaScript has the concept of constructor functions. The purpose of a constructor function is to create instances of objects initialized in a particular way. Here's an example:

function Foo(b) {
    this.bar = b;
}
var f = new Foo();

Technically, any function can be used as a constructor function. The convention is to give functions meant to be used with new names starting with a capital letter, just to reinforce that we call them in a special way.

Calling a function via new creates a new object instance and makes that object the this value within the function call. So

function Foo(b) {
    alert(this === window);
}
var f = new Foo(); // alerts false, `this` !== `window` (it points to the new object created for the call)
var f = Foo();     // alerts true, `this` === `window` because we didn't use `new`

As you can see, it's important to call a function in the correct way. If it's designed to be used with new, call it via new; if it's not, don't.

(new does more than just create a blank object; the object created has some other aspects set up in a certain way. I won't go into the details here, but I didn't want to leave you with the impression that all it did was create a new object instance.)

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 great answer. Covers all the bases in mostly plain English. I'm going to point to this answer whenever this this issue comes up again. –  slebetman Dec 17 '10 at 8:19

In your last example (the function inside json object), this refers to the json object that is holding the function.

In your first example, the first this is referring to the object that is holding f1, it happens to be the global window object. The second this in f2 is also referring to the global object and not to f1, and this is a known bug in javascript, when you have one function defined in another.

A common workaround is this (no pun intended):

function f1() {
  alert (this);
  var that = this;
  function f2() {
    alert (that);
  }
  f2();
}

Notice that if you define a function in a json object, it can still be "moved around" and the context of this will change. For example:

var car1 = {
  color: "red",
  f: function () { alert (this.color); }
}

car1.f(); // prints "red"

var car2 = {
  color: "blue",
}

car2.f = car1.f;

car2.f(); // prints "blue"
share|improve this answer

see this article on http://howtonode.org by Tim Caswell

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent article! –  Misha Moroshko Oct 15 '11 at 11:24

In JavaScript "this" always refers to the object which "owns" the function, or rather, the object to which a function was bound via a property at the time it was called. Consider this example:

var f = function() { alert(this); }
f(); // Alerts the "DOM window" (global) object, which
     // is implied if there is no explicit owner.
var o = {toString:function(){return "Foo!";}}
o.func = f;
o.func(); // Alerts the "Foo!" object (o) since the
          // function then belongs to it as a member.

Now regarding your specific examples, here's what happens:

//exmp1
function f1() {
  alert(this);
  function f2() {
    alert(this);
  }
  f2(); // Alerts "the global object", since f2
        // is not bound to any object's property.
}
f1(); // Alerts "the global object" (probably DOM window)
      // for same reason as above.

//exmp2
var jsn = {
  name : "b",
  func : function() {
    alert(this); // Will alert the "jsn" object, since it
                 // owns the function in its "func" member.
    return function() {
      return this; // Returns whoever is calling it!
    };
  }
}
alert(jsn.func()()); // "jsn.func()" returns a function which gets
                     // called by the global "DOM window" object.
share|improve this answer
    
"...object which "owns" the function..." Objects don't own functions, or at least, if they do (for instance, by having a property pointing to the function), it has nothing to do with this except for when you call the function via the property. Recommend removing or amending the statement. Also, using primitives when doing examples of apply seems a very odd choice. –  T.J. Crowder Dec 17 '10 at 7:53
    
Thanks for the tip re: clarity of "ownership" don't want to confuse anybody. Apply working on primitives must be a quirk of V8 providing Object wrappers automatically, ECMA262 5th Ed. indeed states it should be a TypeError. –  maerics Dec 17 '10 at 8:01
    
It's not a quirk of V8. What happens is that since apply requires an object, the primitive is promoted to an object (which is to say, an equivalent object is created and initialized with the primitive's value) and used for the call to the function. But what arrives in the function is not connected to the primitive. Example: jsbin.com/ipuzo4/2 It's perfectly valid to call apply and pass in a primitive, but I wouldn't use it in a basic example. :-) –  T.J. Crowder Dec 17 '10 at 8:09
    
@TJ: Thanks for the explanation! –  maerics Dec 17 '10 at 18:07

when you use a function as a constructor, this points to the object you are constructing.

function Test() {
  this.test = true;
}

t = new Test();
alert(t.test);
share|improve this answer
    
"when you use a function as a constructor, this points to the object you are constructing" True but irrelevant. He never does that in his code. There's no new anywhere. –  T.J. Crowder Dec 17 '10 at 7:42
    
I'm not well versed in javascript. I thought this was the only use, so I've learnt something [= –  dan_waterworth Dec 17 '10 at 7:44

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