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Possible Duplicate:
Why does .NET use banker's rounding as default?

Here is a sample code

decimal num1=390, num2=60, result;
result=num1/num2; // here I get 6.5
result=Math.Round(result,0);

the final value of result should be 7 but, I am getting 6. Why such a behavior?

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marked as duplicate by Damien_The_Unbeliever, Hans Olsson, ChrisF, Cody Gray, Graviton Dec 18 '10 at 3:17

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Check third parameter MidpointRounding.

By default used MidpointRounding.ToEven, so

Math.Round(result,0); // 6.0 
//or
Math.Round(result,0, MidpointRounding.ToEven); // 6.0 

//But:
Math.Round(result,0, MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero); // 7.0 
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This kind of rounding is sometimes called rounding to nearest, or banker's rounding. It minimizes rounding errors that result from consistently rounding a midpoint value in a single direction.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/3s2d3xkk.aspx

Example:

//       11.1 --> 11
//       11.2 --> 11
//       11.3 --> 11
//       11.4 --> 11
//       11.5 --> 11
//       11.6 --> 12
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From MSDN:

If the fractional component of d is halfway between two integers, one of which is even and the other odd, the even number is returned.

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decimal.Math.Round uses MidpointRounding.ToEven as default.

Meaning if the one's digit is odd, it is changed to an even digit. Otherwise, it is left unchanged. This behavior follows IEEE Standard 754, section 4. It is sometimes called rounding to nearest, or banker's rounding. It minimizes rounding errors that result from consistently rounding a midpoint value in a single direction.

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It must be the same reason as why

      Math.Round(6.5, 0);

similarly yields 6 rather than 7. It all comes down to the MSDN documentation link text which exemplify

  Console.WriteLine(Math.Round(3.45, 1)); //Returns 3.4.
  Console.WriteLine(Math.Round(4.35, 1)); // Returns 4.4

in another MDSN Doc is states

The integer nearest parameter d. If the fractional component of d is halfway between two integers, one of which is even and the other odd, the even number is returned. Note that this method returns a Decimal instead of an integral type.

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Use Math.Ceiling Method(). decimal num1=390, num2=60, result;
result=Math.Ceiling(num1/num2);

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Not the same as rounding, 5.4 -> 6 instead of 5. –  Shurdoof Dec 17 '10 at 9:02

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