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In Visual Studio 2008 (without SP1), I can compile and run this code

// vcconsole.cpp : Defines the entry point for the console application.
//

#include "stdafx.h"
#define NOERROR
#ifdef   /* 

   */  NOERROR
void pr() {
 printf("hello world..\n");
} 
#endif

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
 pr();
 return 0;
}

But if I manually replace the block comment with spaces :

// vcconsole.cpp : Defines the entry point for the console application.
//

#include "stdafx.h"
#define NOERROR
#ifdef      

       NOERROR
void pr() {
 printf("hello world..\n");
} 
#endif

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
 pr();
 return 0;
}

it fails to compile with error:

1>------ Build started: Project: vcconsole, Configuration: Debug Win32 ------
1>Compiling...
1>vcconsole.cpp
1>c:\x64\winproj\vcconsole\vcconsole.cpp(6) : fatal error C1016: #if[n]def expected an identifier
1>Build log was saved at "file://c:\x64\winproj\vcconsole\Debug\BuildLog.htm"
1>vcconsole - 1 error(s), 0 warning(s)
========== Build: 0 succeeded, 1 failed, 0 up-to-date, 0 skipped ==========

Why the 2 are not equivalent?

This concerns me because I am using a tool to remove all comments from my c++ source code (I need to do this for other reasons) before compiling them. If the 2 are not equivalent somehow, my tool may fail.

share|improve this question
    
BTW, I expect the first one should fail exactly because of the error produced in the 2nd version. But it doesn't. – JavaMan Dec 17 '10 at 10:24
    
from MSDN: Preprocessor reference->phases of translation:The source file is broken into preprocessing tokens and white-space characters. Comments in the source file are replaced with one space character each. Newline characters are retained. – JavaMan Dec 17 '10 at 10:30
1  
@JavaMan: The last sentence does certainly not refer to newlines in comments. – Björn Pollex Dec 17 '10 at 10:34
    
then 'cl.exe filename.cpp /P' should be producing wrong results. Since newlines in comment are retained in the file generated by it. – JavaMan Dec 17 '10 at 10:37
    
@JavaMan: But it generates a file in which there are no preprocessor directives. Newlines outside of preprocessor directives are fine. For the purpose of handling preprocessor directives, comments are replaced by spaces. – Björn Pollex Dec 17 '10 at 10:43
up vote 3 down vote accepted

There's something in the Standard like a comment is replaced by a single space... that effectively removes the newlines. Your tool should do the same.

Note that under [lex.parses] 2.1.1.3 "Each comment is replaced by one space character." before 2.1.1.4 "Preprocessing directives are executed and macro invocations are expanded.".

As unquiet mind observes, a preprocessor directive only extends from the introductory preprocessor token through to the next newline, so you can't put the symbol on a subsequent line (unless you use backslash escapes to effectively combine lines in an early parsing phase).

So, my tentative explanation for Microsoft's non-compliant preprocessing switch behaviour is: Visual C++ is doing something non-Standard in preserving newlines in comments (probably to help track line numbers), so it then needs to build in some tracking and tolerance for the consequent multi-line preprocessing directives, keeping them working. /P and /E output the non-Standard multi-line directives, but lose that tracking metadata that makes it compilable.

share|improve this answer
    
No, if you try cl.exe filename.cpp /P, the preprocessor generates a file with newlines in comment retained. – JavaMan Dec 17 '10 at 10:28
    
@JavaMan: The preprocessor cares about newlines, the compiler does not. – Björn Pollex Dec 17 '10 at 10:32
    
I've described the Standard's requirement - [lex.parses] 2.1.1.3. "Each comment is replaced by one space character." If your compiler appears to do otherwise (my VS2005 /P output is too), then either that switch isn't producing what it eventually compiles or the compiler's not Standards compliant. Given the code does compile, it's clear that /P isn't outputting the completely preprocessed code. – Tony D Dec 17 '10 at 10:40

Replacing by a space would result in:

#ifdef      NOERROR

However, you replaced by spaces and newlines. Preprocessor directives are terminated by newlines just like C++ statements are terminated by semicolons.

share|improve this answer

From the Standard, section 16.1

The only white-space characters that shall appear between preprocessing tokens within a
preprocessing directive (from just after the introducing #preprocessing token through just before the terminating new-line character) are space and horizontal-tab (including spaces that have replaced comments or possibly other white-space characters in translation phase 3).

g++ also (correctly) fails to compile the code.

share|improve this answer
    
I am curious, does it mention anything about using `\` for breaking lines in macros? – Björn Pollex Dec 17 '10 at 10:37
    
@Space_Cowboy: yes, that's in an earlier phase 2.1.1.2, whereas comment->space translation is 2.1.1.3 and preprocessing directives 2.1.1.4. – Tony D Dec 17 '10 at 10:45
    
@Space Not obviously. But I'm not sure at which phase newline escaping is handled in. – unquiet mind Dec 17 '10 at 10:47

The first one works, because a comment is a comment, and hence ignored by the preprocessor and the compiler. The second one does not work, because macros cannot span multiple lines, unless you put a \ as the last character of each line.

If you want to automatically remove comments, but avoid trouble with the preprocessor, what you could try is to run the preprocessor first, then remove comments from the preprocessed files, and then compile those.

share|improve this answer
    
A couple nit picks: comments aren't ignored, they're replaced with a single space. What the Microsoft compiler is doing with it's /E and /P preprocessing output is replacing the comment with a multi-line space - I'd bet this technique's used to keep the line numbers unchanged. So, in the preprocessed output there's nothing left identifying where comments used to be, and your idea to remove them post preprocessing won't work per se, though you could look for # directives and delete newlines until the next token returned to the same line... :-). – Tony D Dec 17 '10 at 11:02

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