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One of the biggest annoyances I find in Python is the inability of the re module to save its state without explicitly doing it in a match object. Often, one needs to parse lines and if they comply a certain regex take out values from them by the same regex. I would like to write code like this:

if re.match('foo (\w+) bar (\d+)', line):
  # do stuff with .group(1) and .group(2)
elif re.match('baz whoo_(\d+)', line):
  # do stuff with .group(1)
# etc.

But unfortunately it's impossible to get to the matched object of the previous call to re.match, so this is written like this:

m = re.match('foo (\w+) bar (\d+)', line)
if m:
  # do stuff with m.group(1) and m.group(2)
else:
  m = re.match('baz whoo_(\d+)', line)
  if m:
    # do stuff with m.group(1)

Which is rather less convenient and gets really unwieldy as the list of elifs grows longer.

A hackish solution would be to wrap the re.match and re.search in my own objects that keep state somewhere. Has anyone used this? Are you aware of semi-standard implementations (in large frameworks or something)?

What other workarounds can you recommend? Or perhaps, am I just misusing the module and could achieve my needs in a cleaner way?

Thanks in advance

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I wish the module had a state-keeping form, too. But I don't consider it hackish to create your own object that keeps state. Seems like a clean, localized and well-defined solution to me. –  Brian Clapper Jan 16 '09 at 15:35
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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Trying out some ideas...

It looks like you would ideally want an expression with side effects. If this were allowed in Python:

if m = re.match('foo (\w+) bar (\d+)', line):
  # do stuff with m.group(1) and m.group(2)
elif m = re.match('baz whoo_(\d+)', line):
  # do stuff with m.group(1)
elif ...

... then you would clearly and cleanly be expressing your intent. But it's not. If side effects were allowed in nested functions, you could:

m = None
def assign_m(x):
  m = x
  return x

if assign_m(re.match('foo (\w+) bar (\d+)', line)):
  # do stuff with m.group(1) and m.group(2)
elif assign_m(re.match('baz whoo_(\d+)', line)):
  # do stuff with m.group(1)
elif ...

Now, not only is that getting ugly, but it's still not valid Python code -- the nested function 'assign_m' isn't allowed to modify the variable m in the outer scope. The best I can come up with is really ugly, using nested class which is allowed side effects:

# per Brian's suggestion, a wrapper that is stateful
class m_(object):
  def match(self, *args):
    self.inner_ = re.match(*args)
    return self.inner_
  def group(self, *args):
    return self.inner_.group(*args)
m = m_()

# now 'm' is a stateful regex
if m.match('foo (\w+) bar (\d+)', line):
  # do stuff with m.group(1) and m.group(2)
elif m.match('baz whoo_(\d+)', line):
  # do stuff with m.group(1)
elif ...

But that is clearly overkill.

You migth consider using an inner function to allow local scope exits, which allows you to remove the else nesting:

def find_the_right_match():
  # now 'm' is a stateful regex
  m = re.match('foo (\w+) bar (\d+)', line)
  if m:
    # do stuff with m.group(1) and m.group(2)
    return # <== exit nested function only
  m = re.match('baz whoo_(\d+)', line)
  if m:
    # do stuff with m.group(1)
    return

find_the_right_match()

This lets you flatten nesting=(2*N-1) to nesting=1, but you may have just moved the side-effects problem around, and the nested functions are very likely to confuse most Python programmers.

Lastly, there are side-effect-free ways of dealing with this:

def cond_with(*phrases):
  """for each 2-tuple, invokes first item.  the first pair where
  the first item returns logical true, result is passed to second
  function in pair.  Like an if-elif-elif.. chain"""
  for (cond_lambda, then_lambda) in phrases:
    c = cond_lambda()
    if c:
      return then_lambda(c) 
  return None


cond_with( 
  ((lambda: re.match('foo (\w+) bar (\d+)', line)), 
      (lambda m: 
          ... # do stuff with m.group(1) and m.group(2)
          )),
  ((lambda: re.match('baz whoo_(\d+)', line)),
      (lambda m:
          ... # do stuff with m.group(1)
          )),
  ...)

And now the code barely even looks like Python, let alone understandable to Python programmers (is that Lisp?).

I think the moral of this story is that Python is not optimized for this sort of idiom. You really need to just be a little verbose and live with a large nesting factor of else conditions.

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LOL and ++ about the Lispy code. Well thought out :-) But I would be strongly unhappy with any programmer who writes real code like this ;-) –  Eli Bendersky Jan 16 '09 at 6:36
    
@eliben - heh, thanks. could have been worse.. at least I didn't try to use call/cc! –  Aaron Jan 28 '09 at 21:29
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You might like this module which implements the wrapper you are looking for.

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Thanks, this is what I had in mind –  Eli Bendersky Jan 15 '09 at 18:33
    
Thanks for the pointer! I like the basic concept of the recipe linked to, but it could be improved if you are using a more recent version of Python. I'm strictly 2.5+ so I'm going to go play hacky-hack now. –  Peter Rowell Jan 15 '09 at 18:33
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You could write a utility class to do the "save state and return result" operation. I don't think this is that hackish. It's fairly trivial to implement:

class Var(object):
    def __init__(self, val=None): self.val = val

    def set(self, result):
        self.val = result
        return result

And then use it as:

lastMatch = Var()

if lastMatch.set(re.match('foo (\w+) bar (\d+)', line)):
    print lastMatch.val.groups()

elif lastMatch.set(re.match('baz whoo_(\d+)', line)):
    print lastMatch.val.groups()
share|improve this answer
    
This is an interesting concept. Hmm, it can handle a lot of the cases where Python's inability to use assignment in an expression hurts. –  Eli Bendersky Jan 16 '09 at 6:34
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class last(object):
  def __init__(self, wrapped, initial=None):
    self.last = initial
    self.func = wrapped

  def __call__(self, *args, **kwds):
    self.last = self.func(*args, **kwds)
    return self.last

def test():
  """
  >>> test()
  crude, but effective: (oYo)
  """
  import re
  m = last(re.compile("(oYo)").match)
  if m("abc"):
    print("oops")
  elif m("oYo"): #A
    print("crude, but effective: (%s)" % m.last.group(1)) #B
  else:
    print("mark")

if __name__ == "__main__":
  import doctest
  doctest.testmod()

last is also suitable as a decorator.

Realized that in my effort to make it self-testing and work in 2.5, 2.6, and 3.0 that I obscured the real solution somewhat. The important lines are marked #A and #B above, where you use the same object to test (name it match or is_somename) and retrieve its last value. Easy to abuse, but also easy to tweak and, if not pushed too far, get surprisingly clear code.

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Based on the great answers to this question, I've concocted the following mechanism. It appears like a general way to solve the "no assignment in conditions" limitation of Python. The focus is transparency, implemented by silent delegation:

class Var(object):
    def __init__(self, val=None):
        self._val = val

    def __getattr__(self, attr):
        return getattr(self._val, attr)

    def __call__(self, arg):
        self._val = arg
        return self._val


if __name__ == "__main__":
    import re

    var = Var()

    line = 'foo kwa bar 12'

    if var(re.match('foo (\w+) bar (\d+)', line)):
        print var.group(1), var.group(2)
    elif var(re.match('baz whoo_(\d+)', line)):
        print var.group(1)

In the general case, this is a thread-safe solution, because you can create your own instances of Var. For more ease-of-use when threading is not an issue, a default Var object can be imported and used. Here's a module holding the Var class:

class Var(object):
    def __init__(self, val=None):
        self._val = val

    def __getattr__(self, attr):
        return getattr(self._val, attr)

    def __call__(self, arg):
        self._val = arg
        return self._val

var = Var()

And here's the user's code:

from var import Var, var
import re

line = 'foo kwa bar 12'

if var(re.match('foo (\w+) bar (\d+)', line)):
    print var.group(1), var.group(2)
elif var(re.match('baz whoo_(\d+)', line)):
    print var.group(1)

While not thread-safe, for a lot of simple scripts this provides a useful shortcut.

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Probably the simplest solution is to return early so you can get back to creating variables instead of needing to make an immediate test.

def get_results(line):
    m = re.match('foo (\w+) bar (\d+)', line)
    if m:
      # do stuff with .group(1) and .group(2)
      return result
    m = re.match('baz whoo_(\d+)', line)
    if m:
      # do stuff with .group(1)
      return other_result
    # etc.

This way you avoid excessive nesting.

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