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I've never been sure that I understand the difference between str/unicode decode and encode.

I know that str().decode() is for when you have a string of bytes that you know has a certain character encoding, given that encoding name it will return a unicode string.

I know that unicode().encode() converts unicode chars into a string of bytes according to a given encoding name.

But I don't understand what str().encode() and unicode().decode() are for. Can anyone explain, and possibly also correct anything else I've gotten wrong above?

EDIT:

Several answers give info on what .encode does on a string, but no-one seems to know what .decode does for unicode.

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7 Answers

up vote 43 down vote accepted

The decode method of unicode strings really doesn't have any applications at all (unless you have some non-text data in a unicode string for some reason -- see below). It is mainly there for historical reasons, i think. In Python 3 it is completely gone.

unicode().decode() will perform an implicit encoding of s using the default (ascii) codec. Verify this like so:

>>> s = u'ö'
>>> s.decode()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
UnicodeEncodeError: 'ascii' codec can't encode character u'\xf6' in position 0:
ordinal not in range(128)

>>> s.encode('ascii')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
UnicodeEncodeError: 'ascii' codec can't encode character u'\xf6' in position 0:
ordinal not in range(128)

The error messages are exactly the same.

For str().encode() it's the other way around -- it attempts an implicit decoding of s with the default encoding:

>>> s = 'ö'
>>> s.decode('utf-8')
u'\xf6'
>>> s.encode()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
UnicodeDecodeError: 'ascii' codec can't decode byte 0xc3 in position 0:
ordinal not in range(128)

Used like this, str().encode() is also superfluous.

But there is another application of the latter method that is useful: there are encodings that have nothing to do with character sets, and thus can be applied to 8-bit strings in a meaningful way:

>>> s.encode('zip')
'x\x9c;\xbc\r\x00\x02>\x01z'

You are right, though: the ambiguous usage of "encoding" for both these applications is... awkard. Again, with separate byte and string types in Python 3, this is no longer an issue.

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.decode() on Unicode strings might be useful e.g., print u'\\u0203'.decode('unicode-escape') –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 21 '13 at 4:06
    
+1 for the mention of non-character encodings (i.e. zip). –  dotancohen Dec 29 '13 at 8:40
    
Good example @J.F.Sebastian in python3 I guess you would do: print u'\\u0203'.encode('utf8').decode('unicode-escape') –  AJP Mar 27 at 11:54
    
@AJP: on Python 3: codecs.decode(u'\\u0203', 'unicode-escape') –  J.F. Sebastian Mar 27 at 16:57
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To represent a unicode string as a string of bytes is known as encoding. Use u'...'.encode(encoding).

Example:

    >>> u'æøå'.encode('utf8')
    '\xc3\x83\xc2\xa6\xc3\x83\xc2\xb8\xc3\x83\xc2\xa5'
    >>> u'æøå'.encode('latin1')
    '\xc3\xa6\xc3\xb8\xc3\xa5'
    >>> u'æøå'.encode('ascii')
    UnicodeEncodeError: 'ascii' codec can't encode characters in position 0-5: 
    ordinal not in range(128)

You typically encode a unicode string whenever you need to use it for IO, for instance transfer it over the network, or save it to a disk file.

To convert a string of bytes to a unicode string is known as decoding. Use unicode('...', encoding) or '...'.decode(encoding).

Example:

   >>> u'æøå'
   u'\xc3\xa6\xc3\xb8\xc3\xa5' # the interpreter prints the unicode object like so
   >>> unicode('\xc3\xa6\xc3\xb8\xc3\xa5', 'latin1')
   u'\xc3\xa6\xc3\xb8\xc3\xa5'
   >>> '\xc3\xa6\xc3\xb8\xc3\xa5'.decode('latin1')
   u'\xc3\xa6\xc3\xb8\xc3\xa5'

You typically decode a string of bytes whenever you receive string data from the network or from a disk file.

I believe there are some changes in unicode handling in python 3, so the above is probably not correct for python 3.

Some good links:

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You didn't answer the OP's question. OP wants to know what str.encode() and unicode.decode() do. You just repeated what was stated in the original question. –  stuckintheshuck Sep 4 '13 at 17:20
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mybytestring.encode(somecodec) is meaningful for these values of somecodec:

  • base64
  • bz2
  • zlib
  • hex
  • quopri
  • rot13
  • string_escape
  • uu

I am not sure what decoding an already decoded unicode text is good for. Trying that with any encoding seems to always try to encode with the system's default encoding first.

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This is wonderful! Thank you. –  dotancohen Dec 29 '13 at 8:42
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anUnicode.encode('encoding') results in a string object and can be called on a unicode object

aString.decode('encoding') results in an unicode object and can be called on a string, encoded in given encoding.


Some more explanations:

You can create some unicode object, which doesn't have any encoding set. The way it is stored by Python in memory is none of your concern. You can search it, split it and call any string manipulating function you like.

But there comes a time, when you'd like to print your unicode object to console or into some text file. So you have to encode it (for example - in UTF-8), you call encode('utf-8') and you get a string with '\u<someNumber>' inside, which is perfectly printable.

Then, again - you'd like to do the opposite - read string encoded in UTF-8 and treat it as an Unicode, so the \u360 would be one character, not 5. Then you decode a string (with selected encoding) and get brand new object of the unicode type.

Just as a side note - you can select some pervert encoding, like 'zip', 'base64', 'rot' and some of them will convert from string to string, but I believe the most common case is one that involves UTF-8/UTF-16 and string.

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There are a few encodings that can be used to de-/encode from str to str or from unicode to unicode. For example base64, hex or even rot13. They are listed in the codecs module.

Edit:

The decode message on a unicode string can undo the corresponding encode operation:

In [1]: u'0a'.decode('hex')
Out[1]: '\n'

The returned type is str instead of unicode which is unfortunate in my opinion. But when you are not doing a proper en-/decode between str and unicode this looks like a mess anyway.

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-1: The decode method is not being applied to the unicode object. Instead, the unicode object is being encoded as an 'ascii' bytestring, before decode operation starts. For a proof of that assertion, try u'ã'.decode('hex') - that yields UnicodeEncodeError –  nosklo Jan 16 '09 at 11:17
2  
@nosklo: You are right. What I really meant is that unicode objects have a decode() method so that you can apply non-character-encoding-codecs to them, too. This whole non-character-encoding-business makes this interface a mess in Python < 3. –  unbeknown Jan 16 '09 at 19:43
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You should read Python UnicodeDecodeError - Am I misunderstanding encode. My understanding of unicode in Python was a lot clearer after reading the accepted answer.

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One use of encode () and decode () is to encode and decode the data for sending and receiving data between programs that communicate using sockets.

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-1 for not reading the question. –  dotancohen Dec 29 '13 at 8:42
    
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. –  웃웃웃웃웃 Feb 19 at 17:44
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