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I'm trying to follow a strict IoC pattern and forcing myself to not fall into bad habits again.

Should I have the Member class's constructor load all the relevant information itself?

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Net;
using System.Text;
using System.Xml.Linq;
using SharpDIC.Api.Interfaces;
using SharpDIC.Api.Models;
using System.Configuration;

namespace SharpDIC.Api.Concrete
{
    class XmlMemberFinder : IMemberFinder
    {
        public IList<Member> FindAllMembers()
        {
            using (var webClient = new WebClient())
            {
                for (int i = 0; i < 470000; i++)
                {
                    string htmlSource = webClient.DownloadString(ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["MemberUrl"] + i);
                    XDocument response = XDocument.Parse(htmlSource);
                    //The member class would parse the XML itself and load it's attributes itself.
                    Member member = new Member(response);
                }
            }
        }

        public Member FindMember(int memberId)
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }

        public Member FindMember(string memberName)
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }
    }
}

What would you do? What would the best solution be for this to maintain the TDD/IoC viable.

Edit:

Is this okay?

using SharpDIC.Api.Models;

namespace SharpDIC.Api.Interfaces
{
    interface IMemberSource
    {
        Member LoadMember(string source);
    }
}

I'm stuck again though, where do I actually LOAD something? It feels like I'm just creating interface after interface without actually making something work.

share|improve this question
    
I understand your frustration, Sergio - it takes a bit to get your head around it. You're on the right track, but it is likely that LoadMember() shouldn't know the 'source' either - the object that implements it will. Even in your first code block you query a config string to get the source. Your production-implementation of IMemberSource will do the same. LoadMember probably needs no arguments, or maybe it returns an enumeration? –  n8wrl Dec 17 '10 at 14:45
    
Thinking about this some more and I think your IMemberSource is really a repository - something that knows how to 'get' members from some source - DB, XML/Web Service, hard-coded-collection for testing, etc. –  n8wrl Dec 17 '10 at 14:52
    
@n8wrl: Thanks for your comments, I'm sure I'll get the hang of this in no time. :) I think I solved this particular issue. I hope I'm doing things right. :P –  delete Dec 17 '10 at 14:53

2 Answers 2

EXCELLENT question, Sergio! I would suggest defining an 'IMemberSource' interface that does the load for you. Inject it via IoC. For testing, mock one to test your XmlMemberFinder. For production, it does the WebClient work.

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IoC or DI is all about giving objects the collaborators that they need in order to get their job done, rather than having those objects make them itself.

It turns out that if you do this, its much easier to have classes that have a single responsibility - this is a good thing, as classes that have a single responsibility are easier to understand and change.

Furthermore, it also turns out that writing code using TDD means that this sort of thing happens quite naturally.

I confess I don't really understand what your code is trying to do - it appears to be loading half a million URLs and then throwing away the results.

Lets assume that you are trying to implement some kind of user store. Some other parts of the system will need this user store for some reason or other...

The way DI comes into this is that the other bits of the system will be injected with the user store.

Imagine you have an interface:

(I'm not really a c# person, so the syntax may not be 100%)

public interface UserStore { Member findMember(string memberId); }

Now you can write multiple implementations of your user store! - Firstly one that goes to the web.

public class HttpUserStore : UserStore {

   private final URI baseUri;

   public HttpUserStore(URI baseuri) {
    this.uri = baseUri;
   }

   public Member findMember(string memberId) {
       string uri = constructUriFor(memberId);
       // go get the xml
       return unmarshal(xml);
   }
}

Or you can write a test one.

public class StubUserStore : UserStore {

   public Member findMember(string memberId) {
      return new MemberBuilder()
                    .withMemberId(memberId)
                    .withName("Joe Bloggs")
                    .build();
   }
}

Now you have two implementations - they both implement the interface, and the class that uses them doesn't know which one it has been given. It does know though whatever it has been given, it can use to find members - thus its dependencies have been injected.

For example, imagine that our web-login module needs to use the UserStore in order to let the user login.

We could instantiate it like:

 UserStore userStore = new HttpUserStore(new URI("https://secret.stuff");
  HttpLoginModule loginModule = new BasicAuthLoginModule(userStore);

  WebSite webSite = new SuperWebSite(loginModule);

or like this:

 UserStore userStore = new StubUserStore();
  HttpLoginModule loginModule = new BasicAuthLoginModule(userStore);
  WebSite webSite = new SuperWebSite(loginModule);

or like this:

 UserStore userStore = new StubUserStore();
  HttpLoginModule loginModule = new X509LoginModule(userStore);
  WebSite webSite = new SuperWebSite(loginModule);
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