Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am currently consuming an api feed into a ruby on rails project. Being new to Ruby I don't feel that I am consuming and managing the JSON properly. There are a few features which are not working and I believe they revolve around how I'm treating the JSON object once I have it. Here is what I am working with.

{ "auth" : {
    "person" : {
        "id" : 1,
        "name" : "john",
        "pass" : "123"
    },
    "person" : {
        "id" : 2,
        "name" : "fred",
        "pass" : "789"
    }
}}

I find I can get a simple array by doing:

jsonArray = JSON.parse(persons)
# the following allows me to target the persons objects
personArray = jsonArray["auth"]["persons"]

The problem here is attempting to do something like personArray.first(5) gives me int to string conversion errors. I'd like to get this into a workable hash, something I can do operations off of, but currently it seems I can only iterate over it as a hash. I may need to sort, pull persons out of, and do other operations to this result data. How should I be correctly importing this?

share|improve this question
1  
Note that jsonArray in your Ruby code above is NOT an Array; it's a Hash. Calling a JavaScript object an "associative array" leads to this sort of sloppy terminology. –  Phrogz Dec 17 '10 at 16:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Actually direct parsing your json string wouldn't give you ["auth"]["persons"]. There is no "persons" field inside the json string......I hope that's a typo error.

The exact format you need in order to make personArray.first(5) to work should be:

{
  "auth": {
    "persons": [ # Note the square bracket here, which defines an array instead of a hash
      {"id": 1, "name": "john", "pass": "123"},
      {"id": 2, "name": "fred", "pass": "789"}
    ]
  }
}

and you could do what you wanted to do now.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that was a typo, thanks for the note. I hadn't noticed the bracket/brace issue. This is an API which I was not able to design, but may be able to work with the provider. It would make much more sense to treat the persons as an array rather than distinct objects. I'll test this out and will mark this if it works. Thanks! –  Jeremy B. Dec 17 '10 at 16:54

Your JSON above results in a JS object storing less data than you think it has. You are overwriting the person key repeatedly. Try copy/pasting this into the console of your web browser:

var o = { "auth" : {
  "person" : {
    "id" : 1,
    "name" : "john",
    "pass" : "123"
  },
  "person" : {
    "id" : 2,
    "name" : "fred",
    "pass" : "789"
  }
}};

JSON.stringify(o);
// '{"auth":{"person":{"id":2,"name":"fred","pass":"789"}}}'
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.