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I am new to Scala programming and have some difficulty with functional programming and immutable collections. I am trying to port my numeric code from C++ to Scala.

A lot of time I have code operating on small vector like this:

double ytmp[6];

for (int i=0; i<6; i++) {
    ytmp[i] = y[i] + h*(a41*dydx[i] + a42*k2[i] + a43*k3[i]);
}

How do I write something like this in efficient Scala? I thought about using simple lists in the beginning, but have problems with the immutable types, so I can't just create a empty list ytmp and modify it later like I am used to i C++. Thanks for the help

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6 Answers 6

For efficiency, you write this exactly the same way (note, this is not functional code), except with a while loop. For loops are converted into incredibly inefficient (yet splendidly general and powerful) constructs. So, in this case, you (warning, untested):

val ytmp = new Array[Double](6)
var i = 0
while (i < 6) {
  ytmp(i) = y(i) + h*(a41*dydx(i) + a42*k2(i) + a43*k3(i))
  i += 1
}

which will run about as fast as your C++ code, typically.

You start to benefit from Scala once you wrap primitive stuff like this into classes, and then operate on large numbers of those classes with map, foreach, and so on.

But for numeric code, either you write pretty but embarrassingly slow code (from a C++ perspective), or ugly but decently-performing code (yes, ugly compared to C-like C++).

Since I do this a lot, I try to put this ugly but fast code in nice libraries and then forget about it as much as possible and work at the higher level enabled by the libraries.

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Incidentally, this is about 15% slower than the corresponding C++ code for a trivial microbenchmark case; this drops somewhat if C++ is allowed to stack allocate while Scala is forced to new (rather than re-use an already allocated vector). –  Rex Kerr Dec 17 '10 at 22:01

This is how I'd write it:

// C++
double ytmp[6];

// Scala
val ytmp = new Array[Double](6)


// C++ (elided the computation to make conversion clearer)
for (int i=0; i<6; i++) {
    ytmp[i] = func(i);
}

// Scala
for (i <- ytmp.indices)
    ytmp(i) = func(i)


// C++
double func(int i) {
    return y[i] + h*(a41*dydx[i] + a42*k2[i] + a43*k3[i]);
}

// Scala
def func(i: Int) = y(i) + h * (a41 * dydx(i) + a42 * k2(i) + a43 * k3(i))

So, this is a first transformation, which, barring any mistakes on my part, should do the same thing. There are other considerations like using an immutable collection instead of Array, or initializing the array at the time of creation. However, arrays will be faster for the kind of code you are writing. One interesting option for array initialization would be this:

def func(i: Int) = y(i) + h * (a41 * dydx(i) + a42 * k2(i) + a43 * k3(i))
val ytmp = Array.tabulate[Double](6)(func)

However, I'm not sure tabulate will give you the same performance. Maybe.

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1  
Your first try is 3x slower than a while loop; your second is 5x slower. –  Rex Kerr Dec 17 '10 at 21:24
1  
@Rex Given that Function1 is optimized and Range is particularly optimized, once JVM optimizations kick in, the difference should be very small (from earlier benchmarks). I assume you benchmarked it in a proper manner, so I'm suprised. –  Daniel C. Sobral Dec 17 '10 at 22:52
    
@Rex I got rather different results. The tabulate version is four times slower, and the other is eight times slower. I'm very much surprised by this. –  Daniel C. Sobral Dec 17 '10 at 23:14
    
@Daniel - Was that on 2.8.1, and were a41 and dydx and so on set as vals outside the inner loop? I had only the function evaluation itself inside the large inner loop. –  Rex Kerr Dec 18 '10 at 1:32
    
@Rex Yes -- well, latest Scala. I wanted to try something else before putting the link to the code. I keep getting widely different results with small changes, which is the curse of microbenchmarks. –  Daniel C. Sobral Dec 18 '10 at 2:15

Here's another possibility - no idea if its performant etc:

ytmp.zipWithIndex map ((yi) => yi._1 + h*(a41*dydx(yi._2) + a42*k2(yi._2) + a43*k(yi._2)))

which returns an array

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1  
actually if you do ytmp.view.zipWithIndex then there will be only a single traversal if I am not mistaken –  Channing Walton Dec 17 '10 at 20:41
    
Your original idea is very slow--15x slower than the while loop. The view is a lot better, but is still 2x slower than the while loop. –  Rex Kerr Dec 17 '10 at 21:17
    
bummer, it would have been nice for a one liner –  Channing Walton Dec 17 '10 at 21:34
    
@Channing - Hey, only a 2x decrease in performance is pretty good, all things considered! It's the best of the semi-functional answers so far. –  Rex Kerr Dec 17 '10 at 21:37
    
@Channing - I write a lot of high performance code, so I have my own set of microbenchmarking utilities. In this case, I basically fill in all the different variables and run it a bunch of times, keeping some little accumulator variable so the whole thing can't just be elided. –  Rex Kerr Dec 17 '10 at 22:54

You could try something like

val v = for(i <- 1 to 10) yield y(i) + h*(a41*dydx(i) + a42*k2(i) + a43*k(i))

The value v will be an IndexedSeq implemented using a Vector, which is an immutable type built for indexed lookups.

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Bad idea. This is 8x slower than a while loop with Scala 2.8.1. (Even when the code is fixed to match what the OP asked for.) –  Rex Kerr Dec 17 '10 at 21:20

Here is another one liner but I suspect the performance will be bad:

Array(ytmp, dydx, k2, k3).transpose.map(l => l(0) + h*(a41*l(1) + a42*l(2) + a43*l(3)))
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Yes, it's atrocious. 50x slower or more. –  Rex Kerr Dec 17 '10 at 23:00

puh there are a lot of different solutions to this problem, thanks very much. Especially for the benchmark numbers. So I think I will stick with the ".view.zipWithIndex" solution and hope the speed is good enough, otherwise I have to go back to while loops.

Another short problem I face. I need something like this:

List results
while(step<nsteps) {
    so something
    if successful
        results.append(result)
}

If i understand it right I should always prepend to a list. So this is how I would do it:

var list: List[Double] =  Nil
while(step<nsteps) {
    var result = 4.0
    list =  result :: list
}
list = list.reverse

Is this a good idea, or is there a better solution for the performance ?

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You're correct--this is the way to do it with lists--but you should in general ask this as a separate question, not as an answer to your existing question! (This time, though, you've already got the answer, so probably no point creating a new question.) –  Rex Kerr Dec 18 '10 at 14:11

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