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<style>
div#b {
background-color:blue;

}
#b {
background-color:red;

}
</style>

<div id='a'> div a
    <div id='b'>
    div b
    </div>
</div>

I have two questions with this style and this html. Why does div b takes blue color. I want to know the cascading rules where i can learn more about it? My Second question is what should i do with css to make div b appear inside div a?

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You want to make sure you use ID and CLASS properly, for some reason people re-use IDs all the time... facepalm –  Jakub Dec 17 '10 at 18:46
    
Try to keep 1 question per post. If you have 2 questions, make 2 posts. –  DwB Dec 17 '10 at 19:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

CSS Selectors work on specificity. More specific selectors mean that the rules defined within that selector are going to be used in favor of a less specific selector.

As a rule:

  • element selectors such as div, img, etc carry a weight of 1
  • class selectors such as .myClass carry a weight of 10
  • id selectors such as #myId carry a weight of 100

From this you can pretty easily determine why the above failed.

div#b = 101
#b = 100

101 > 100

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cool calculation –  sushil bharwani Dec 17 '10 at 18:52

div#b is more specific than #b because you have an element selector. The first selector specifies what kind of element to look for, whereas the second one says it doesn't matter as long as it picks up that ID.

div#b means

Find only a div whose ID is b.

while #b means

Find any element whose ID is b.

Therefore by specificity, the first rule overrides the second rule.

I don't understand what you mean by making #b appear inside #a, it looks fine to me the way your HTML is structured. On the other hand, you don't have any CSS rules for #a, so there's only background color for #b.

EDIT: if you want the appearance of a box inside another box, give the outer box some padding, and of course a background color:

#a {
    background-color: yellow;
    padding: 1em;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I mean currently onscreen if i give div a a green color both div appears in two different lines a green and a blue. I want to have a blue box enclosed in a green box. –  sushil bharwani Dec 17 '10 at 18:45
    
Also where i can learn the way you decided that div#b is more specific is there some online reference. –  sushil bharwani Dec 17 '10 at 18:45
    
You can find a table of specificity scores here. –  BoltClock Dec 17 '10 at 18:47
    
div#b is more specific because the 'definition' is longer aka more specific.. just like saying 'man' vs 'that man with blue eyes and brown hair' –  Jakub Dec 17 '10 at 18:47
1  
gallery.theopalgroup.com/selectoracle this is rather helpful i find at times. Selector 1: div#b Selects any div element with an id attribute that equals b. It at least breaks down what your css is saying. div#b is more specific because it is specifying a "div" with "id" of b. "#b" could be any element –  Ross Dec 17 '10 at 18:48

For some css rule references see:

http://css-tricks.com/specifics-on-css-specificity/
http://htmlhelp.com/reference/css/structure.html#syntax

Use display: inline to make div b appear inside a:

<style>
div#b {
background-color:blue;
display: inline;
}
#b {
background-color:red;

}
</style>
<body>
<div id='a'> div a
    <div id='b'>
    div b
    </div>
end div a
</div>
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The issue with "my divs appear as lines" is because the width of the inside div is the same as the width of the outside div (default).

Try the following:

<style>
div.inside
{
    background-color: red;
    padding: 5px;
}
div.outside
{
    background-color: green;
    padding: 5px;
}
</style>
<div class="outside">
This is text in the outside div.
<div class="inside">
inside
</div>
</div>

You should see a thin line of green (about 5px wide) on the left, right, and bottom of the inside div. This is not the only way to get this effect.

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