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I need your suggestions in designing a Java/J2EE web based application. Here are its characteristics:

  1. Purely database oriented application (with 10 tables). The database is Oracle.
  2. Three different types of interfaces/screens: 2.1 WebSphere Portlets (6 Interfaces/Screens) 2.2 Handheld Device (5 Interfaces/Screens) 2.3 Web Application (17 Interfaces/Screens)
  3. Few of the screens are just report which will be built using Crystal Reports.
  4. There isn't much business logic involved.

Now my concerns are:

  1. Which architecture should I go for 2 tier or 3 tier?
  2. Which frameworks should I use struts/jsf (MVC)? If any? Or should I go for simple POJO based programming without any framework.
  3. The biggest concern is packaging, I mean I don't want to replicate the business and database layer for each three different types of interfaces I want to develop. Do you think EJB will be good option to expose DB/Business layer? How should I handle this?
  4. Should I use any specific framework like sitemash for presentation layer?
  5. Should I use any specific framework for database layer JPA/Hibernate or should I use simple JDBC?

Any comments/suggestions are welcome...

BR SC

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Are you planning to develop an application for the handhelds? or it's possible for you to use an web app in them? –  SDReyes Dec 17 '10 at 23:38
    
I would like to use SAME web app in them but the question is how can the presentation layer be dynamic enough to render interface depending on the type of device? Is there any framework which provides this functionality? –  SmoothCriminel Dec 18 '10 at 17:48
    
If you use Spring, your web controllers will use the same back end regardless of UI technology. Let the controllers determine what kind of client they're dealing with and figure out what's appropriate to send. –  duffymo Dec 18 '10 at 19:02
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Which architecture should I go for 2 tier or 3 tier?

Three tier: view, service, and persistence.

Which frameworks should I use struts/jsf (MVC)? If any? Or should I go for simple POJO based programming without any framework.

Struts? No. JSF? No. I'd recommend Spring, since it supports both web and portal MVC and contract-first web services.

The biggest concern is packaging, I mean I don't want to replicate the business and database layer for each three different types of interfaces I want to develop. Do you think EJB will be good option to expose DB/Business layer? How should I handle this?

I wouldn't recommend EJB. I'd suggest HTTP based web services for remoting.

Should I use any specific framework like sitemash for presentation layer?

Sitemesh is fine, but it's not a presentation layer.

I'd use Velocity templates to generate straight HTML that I'd send back to clients.

Should I use any specific framework for database layer JPA/Hibernate or should I use simple JDBC?

Ten tables? That schema is small enough where JPA and Hibernate seem like overkill to me. Create a POJO interface for your persistence layer and you can isolate the implementation from clients. Start simple and switch it if you decide you need to or want to.

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Thanks for response. –  SmoothCriminel Dec 18 '10 at 17:25
    
I need some clarification. Lets use the word "layer" instead of "tier". Because it will be logical separation only. OK, lets say I choose Spring. But I am confused how do I get the separation of three layers then? And which specific layer the Spring will belong to? If I will have three separate packages lets say one for each layer, then what advantage Spring will give me? Thanks BR SC –  SmoothCriminel Dec 18 '10 at 17:43
    
The portlet application is going to run in separate server. So, you think I should expose the service & database layer as a webservice to avoid code duplication? –  SmoothCriminel Dec 18 '10 at 17:48
    
How do you get the separation? Easy - POJO interfaces for services and persistence. Spring is a dependency injection engine (object factory) that uses aspect-oriented programming. It's got modules to help with implementation, including JDBC and Hibernate, and glues the whole thing together. Spring will give you a lot of lift. –  duffymo Dec 18 '10 at 18:24
    
No, the database won't be exposed as a service. Clients will go through services to get to the database. That gives you the change to authenticate and authorize users and bind and validate data. No SQL injection attacks that way. Services can be exposed remotely using any technology you choose: SOAP, REST, EJB, RPC, HTTP, Hessian, Burlap - all are supported by Spring. If you start with POJO interfaces, you can defer the choice of remoting technology until later. It'll make your services easier to test. –  duffymo Dec 18 '10 at 18:25
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I think first answer has good baseline. I would echo most of the sentiments, but would additionally recommend jDBI for database access (see this tutorial); it nicely simplifies handling compared to 'raw' JDBC, but without requiring any mapping.

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Thanks for response. How quick is the learning curve? Given the team is expert in JDBC... –  SmoothCriminel Dec 18 '10 at 17:51
    
In my opinion it is a very simple and easy library to use -- sort of like automating things for which teams often write their own helpers methods (closing of connnections, parameter binding). Main challenge is just that lib is not documented extensively. So with some JDBC knowledge usage should be a breeze. –  StaxMan Dec 19 '10 at 22:33
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