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I have an add-on which was written for Firefox 3.6 and now I'm upgrading it for Firefox 4.0, while trying to also keep it compatible with 3.6. Does anyone have any experience with trying to do this, or tips on how to do it without the code getting too spaghetti-ish?

There are a few places where keeping it compatible with both versions means doing something like this:

.myAddonClass {
  -moz-background-size: 100% 100%; /* Fx 3.x */
  background-size: 100% 100%; /* Fx 4.x */
}

which produces a CSS warning in both versions. I can live with that. There are other places where I'm doing things like this:

/** get the current version of this addon */
function getVersion() {
  var version;
  if (Application.extensions) { // Fx 3.x
    version = Application.extensions.get('myaddon@example.com').version;  
  }
  else { // Fx 4.x
    Components.utils.import('resource://gre/modules/AddonManager.jsm');
    AddonManager.getAddonByID('myaddon@example.com', function(addon) {  
      version = addon.version;  
    });
    sleepUntil(function() {
      return version;
    }
  }
  return version;
}

(where sleepUntil is a utility function that uses the Thread.processNextEvent technique)

Checking whether Application.extensions is defined seems cleaner than just checking the Application.version string directly, but maybe there's some flaw with that approach that I don't know about?

I'm also running into issues trying to insert content into webpages. In one case, doc.body.appendChild was working in 3.x but not in 4.x, so I tried doing this:

try { // Fx 3.x
  doc.body.appendChild(myElement);
}
catch (e) { // Fx 4.x
  let span = doc.createElement('span');
  doc.body.appendChild(span);
  span.innerHTML = outerHTML(myElement);
}

The code above doesn't work, but if I insert a throw new Error('') just before doc.body.appendChild(myElement) then it does work, indicating that in Firefox 4, the appendChild call apparently modifies myElement in some way before it throws an error. I'm sure I can figure out how to get this particular code snippet to work, but I'm worried that I'll run into a lot more problems like this as well, so I want to see if anyone else has already gone through a similar process, and has any tips that I should be aware of.

Sorry for the long-ish question. Here's what I'm really asking:

  1. What advice do you have for trying to keep an addon compatible with both Firefox 3 and Firefox 4 at the same time?
  2. What do you think about the idea of branching the code so that we have one version for 3.x and another for 4.x? We would then have to apply any new features to both versions, and test them in both versions, etc.
  3. In general, is it better to test for the presence of the specific feature you want (like I did with if (Application.extensions) ... or try/catch) or to just check whether Application.version starts with '3' or '4'?
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Of course, one option would be to just drop support for Firefox 3.x soon after Firefox 4 is released, but it would probably be good to wait and see whether Firefox 3.x users are hesitant to upgrade... –  MatrixFrog Dec 17 '10 at 21:54
1  
In case anyone was wondering, the solution to that try/catch is to just do doc.body.appendChild(doc.importNode(myElement)) which works perfectly in both versions. –  MatrixFrog Dec 18 '10 at 0:16
    
Rather than writing doc.body.appendChild(doc.importNode(myElement)), can you not create myElement using doc.createElement rather than creating it using some other document? –  Neil Jan 16 '11 at 0:28
    
@Neil I don't have the code in front of me right now but I think the reasoning was that the element was large and complex enough that I wanted to define it in its own html file, then load that in a hidden iframe to parse it, and then just copy it directly into doc. –  MatrixFrog Jan 16 '11 at 4:21
1  
In that case I agree importNode is the way to go. You were just lucky it happened to work in Firefox 3.6; if you read the official DOM documentation it requires you to use adoptNode or importNode. –  Neil Jan 17 '11 at 0:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What advice do you have for trying to keep an addon compatible with both Firefox 3 and Firefox 4 at the same time?

I'd recommend a single XPI for the two most recent major versions. The people on older versions are a lost case, and having two XPIs for different "active" versions is confusing (I haven't experimented recently with the way AMO presents this, but that's my old impression).

What do you think about the idea of branching the code so that we have one version for 3.x and another for 4.x? We would then have to apply any new features to both versions, and test them in both versions, etc.

I'd do that only if the code had become too spaghetti. As a hobbyist, I'd stop updating the older version then, leaving it around for people on older Firefox versions to use. You can see statistics for your extension on AMO to check the adoption rate of new Firefox versions (even if the stats page is not very easy to use.)

In general, is it better to test for the presence of the specific feature you want (like I did with if (Application.extensions) ... or try/catch) or to just check whether Application.version starts with '3' or '4'?

Capability-based branching doesn't matter here, since you're dealing with a fixed set of host applications, unlike the web pages.

Keep in mind the possible side-effects, though:

  • Checking application's version will make it harder to port to other applications, so if parts of your code are only using the platform features, not features of a specific application, it would make more sense to test the platform version.
  • try..catch can also catch other errors, not related to the one you're expecting. I'd avoid it.

P.S.

1) To avoid CSS warnings about unknown properties (if there are lots of them), you can use different styles for different versions via appversion in chrome.manifest

2) I believe the Thread.processNextEvent technique to be dangerous, since it prevents the call stack from unwinding until you're done.

share|improve this answer
    
By "other applications" you mean other Mozilla products, like Seamonkey? –  MatrixFrog Jan 10 '11 at 0:16
    
Can you elaborate on why Thread.processNextEvent is dangerous, or post a link that describes it? –  MatrixFrog Jan 10 '11 at 0:16
1  
@MatrixFrog: 1) Yes; 2) the page you linked to warns about this itself. Imagine your event was called from a function F that must return before AddonManager.getAddonByID will call its callback. Not returning control to F will make the inner processNextEvent loop run endlessly. I'm not saying this will happen in your case, just that it's a non-kosher technique you're using. –  Nickolay Jan 10 '11 at 8:39
    
See, Firefox itself almost never uses it: tinyurl.com/2axfozq –  Nickolay Jan 10 '11 at 8:44

One suggestion from the Mozilla #addons IRC channel, for my getVersion() function: Write a mock-up of AddonManager that's backed by nsIExtensionManager. Or use this one. That way the function itself won't have to have that if/then pattern.

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