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Quick probably obvious question.

If I have:

void print(string input)
{
  cout << input << endl;
}

How do I call it like so:

print("Yo!");

It complains that I'm passing in char *, instead of std::string. Is there a way to typecast it, in the call? Instead of:

string send = "Yo!";
print(send);

Thanks.

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Josh, what compiler are you using? When I compile with "g++ -Wall -pedantic xx.cc", the above code works perfectly well for me. –  Robᵩ Dec 17 '10 at 23:35
3  
Casting should not be necessary. What compiler are you using? What, exactly, does the error say? And could you show your full source code? –  Benjamin Lindley Dec 17 '10 at 23:36
    
Crap. It was breaking on my work machine, which is Ubuntu 10, using g++, with no -Wall, no -pedantic. I just tried on my OSX machine at home, and it works fine, both in a class construct (as it was breaking at work), and in a regular function. –  Josh Dec 17 '10 at 23:41
    
Works fine for me for both g++ 4.5.0 in MinGW and g++ 4.2.4 in Ubuntu 8.04. No compiler options at all. –  Sergey Tachenov Dec 18 '10 at 8:57

6 Answers 6

up vote 16 down vote accepted

You can write your function to take a const std::string&:

void print(const std::string& input)
{
    cout << input << endl;
}

or a const char*:

void print(const char* input)
{
    cout << input << endl;
}

Both ways allow you to call it like this:

print("Hello World!\n"); // A temporary is made
std::string someString = //...
print(someString); // No temporary is made

The second version does require c_str() to be called for std::strings:

print("Hello World!\n"); // No temporary is made
std::string someString = //...
print(someString.c_str()); // No temporary is made
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+1 for const & –  Default Dec 18 '10 at 18:54

You should be able to call print("yo!") since there is a constructor for std::string which takes a const char*. These single argument constructors define implicit conversions from their aguments to their class type (unless the constructor is declared explicit which is not the case for std::string). Have you actually tried to compile this code?

void print(std::string input)
{
    cout << input << endl;
} 
int main()
{
    print("yo");
}

It compiles fine for me in GCC. However, if you declared print like this void print(std::string& input) then it would fail to compile since you can't bind a non-const reference to a temporary (the string would be a temporary constructed from "yo")

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print(string ("Yo!"));

You need to make a (temporary) std::string object out of it.

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The obvious way would be to call the function like this

print(string("Yo!"));
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Well, std::string is a class, const char * is a pointer. Those are two different things. It's easy to get from string to a pointer (since it typically contains one that it can just return), but for the other way, you need to create an object of type std::string.

My recommendation: Functions that take constant strings and don't modify them should always take const char * as an argument. That way, they will always work - with string literals as well as with std::string (via an implicit c_str()).

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If I pass them as const char *, will I be able to use them in the member initialization list? Right now I'm passing strings to a construct, and initializing them via that. –  Josh Dec 17 '10 at 23:30
    
I don't think that there exists an implicit call to c_str(). I think you would have to make the call explicitly. –  Robᵩ Dec 17 '10 at 23:34
    
@Rob Adams, as in: string s = "something"; func(s.c_str()); Right? It's explicit because it has the be instantiated as a variable, s? (Not sarcasm, serious question.) –  Josh Dec 17 '10 at 23:36
    
@Josh, yes that code snippet is what i meant. It is explicit because you have to specify ".c_str()" -- it won't happen magically behind the scenes. –  Robᵩ Dec 17 '10 at 23:39
    
Sigh, I've seen too many string class implementations these days. Some have a operator const char*() const overload that basically returns the c_str(), but you're right, std::string itself doesn't have that. –  EboMike Dec 18 '10 at 0:16

Make it so that your function accepts a const std::string& instead of by-value. Not only does this avoid the copy and is therefore always preferable when accepting strings into functions, but it also enables the compiler to construct a temporary std::string from the char[] that you're giving it. :)

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