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I have two text files, one containing HTML and the other containing URL slugs:

FILE 1 (HTML):

<li><a href="/article/"><button class="showarticle"/><span class="author">Thomas Friedman</span> - <span class="title">The World Is Flat</span></a></li>
<li><a href="/article/"><button class="showarticle"/><span class="author">Michael Dagleish</span> - <span class="title">Scotland In Wartime</span></a></li>
<li><a href="/article/"><button class="showarticle"/><span class="author">Dr. Raymond Kinsella</span> - <span class="title">Progress In Cancer Treatments</span></a></li>
...

FILE 2 (URL SLUGS):

thomas-friedman-the-world-is-flat
michael-dagleish-scotland-in-wartime
dr-raymond-kinsella-progress-in-cancer-treatments
...

I need to merge them so that the slugs in FILE 2 are inserted into the HTML in FILE 1 like this:

OUTPUT:

<li><a href="/article/thomas-friedman-the-world-is-flat"><button class="showarticle"/><span class="author">Thomas Friedman</span> - <span class="title">The World Is Flat</span></a></li>
<li><a href="/article/michael-dagleish-scotland-in-wartime"><button class="showarticle"/><span class="author">Michael Dagleish</span> - <span class="title">Scotland In Wartime</span></a></li>
<li><a href="/article/dr-raymond-kinsella-progress-in-cancer-treatments"><button class="showarticle"/><span class="author">Dr. Raymond Kinsella</span> - <span class="title">Progress In Cancer Treatments</span></a></li>

What's the best approach and which language would be most appropriate to accomplish this task with a minimum of complexity?

share|improve this question
    
I'd do it in perl, but only because I have 10+ years of experience in perl. –  Paul Tomblin Dec 18 '10 at 0:17
    
Are the files guaranteed to be in the same order? –  katrielalex Dec 18 '10 at 0:31
1  
I'd do it in perl, but only because perl would be really good for this problem. I have 10+ minutes of experience in perl. –  Cameron Skinner Dec 18 '10 at 0:33
    
PHP is the easiest! –  Arash N Dec 18 '10 at 0:37
    
@katrielalex: Good question. Yes, the files match up, line for line. –  fidlrz Dec 18 '10 at 0:40

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You need zip-function, which is available in most languages. It's purpose is parallel processing of two or more arrays.
In Ruby it will be something like this:

f1 = File.readlines('file1.txt')
f2 = File.readlines('file2.txt')

File.open('file3.txt','w') do |output_file|

    f1.zip(f2) do |a,b|
        output_file.puts a.sub('/article/','/article/'+b)
    end

end

For zipping more, than two arrays you can do f1.zip(f2,f3,...) do |a,b,c,...|

share|improve this answer
    
By the way, that's Ruby :) –  Sven Marnach Dec 18 '10 at 0:42
    
@Sven Marnach, sure, I forgot to say it when posted ) I've updated answer. –  Nakilon Dec 18 '10 at 0:47
    
Perfect! Thanks! This is beautiful. –  fidlrz Dec 18 '10 at 0:57
1  
You can do f1.zip(f2,f3,...) in ruby –  steenslag Dec 18 '10 at 15:41
1  
@steenslag, wow, I didn't know, strange... thanks! –  Nakilon Dec 20 '10 at 3:05

This will be easy in any language. Here it is in pseudo-Python; I've omitted the lxml bits because I don't have access to them and I can't quite remember the syntax. They're not difficult, though.

with open(...) as htmls, open(...) as slugs, open(...) as output:
    for html, slug in zip(htmls, slugs):
        root = lxml.etree.fromstring(html)
        # do some fiddling with lxml to get the name

        slug = slug.split("-")[(len(name.split()):]
        # add in the extra child in lxml

        output.write(root.tostring())

Interesting features:

  • This doesn't read in the entire file at once; it does it chunk by chunk (well, line-by-line but Python will buffer it). Useful if the files are huge, but probably irrelevant.

  • lxml may be overkill, depending on how rigid the format of the html strings is. If they're guaranteed to be the same and all well-formed, it might be easier for you to use simple string operations. On the other hand, lxml is pretty fast and offers a lot more flexibility.

share|improve this answer
    
lxml API: codespeak.net/lxml/api/index.html –  katrielalex Dec 18 '10 at 0:45

The easiest way to do this is to use the language of the listed ones that you are most familiar with. Even if it doesn't produce the neatest solution, you'll get the job done with the least (mental) effort.

If you know none of them, then Perl is a good option because this is the kind of thing it was designed to do. (I'm assuming that you understand regular expressions ...) And by the look of some of the other answers, Python is a good option too.

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No, I don't know regular expressions. –  fidlrz Dec 18 '10 at 0:43

Python is great language Just have a look at these six lines of python they can merge any big text file, just now i have merged 2 text file of 10 GB each.

 o = open("E:/temp/3.txt","wb") #open for write
 for line in open("E:/temp/1.txt","rb"):
     o.write(line)
 for line in open("E:/temp/2.txt","rb"):
     o.write(line)
 o.close()
share|improve this answer

PHP is the easiest!

$firstFile = file('file1.txt');
$secodFile = file('file2.txt');

$findKey='/article/';
$output='';

if (count($firstFile)==count($secodFile)) 
                    or die('record counts dont match');

for($i=0;$i<count($firstFile);$i++)
{
    $output.=str_replace($findKey,$findKey.trim($secodFile[$i]),$firstFile[$i]);
}

file_put_contents('output.txt',$output);
share|improve this answer
    
Die! die! die! Excellent exception handling ) –  Nakilon Dec 18 '10 at 0:50
    
haha :D thanks ! –  Arash N Dec 18 '10 at 0:52

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