Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have defined the global nls_date_format on Oracle 10.2 XE as follows:

alter system set nls_date_format='YYYY-MM-DD HH24:MI:SS' scope=spfile;

When connecting on Windows, the clients override it with session specific format, so I need to run this line at the beginning of every session:

alter session set nls_date_format='YYYY-MM-DD HH24:MI:SS';

However, I have some custom code that I can't change (jdbc code, using ojdbc14.jar), so I can't execute this line when receiving the connection. Is there a way to change the default value of nls_date_format for all jdbc connections? Perhaps adding something to the connection string, or some environment variable that I can use?

By the way, sqlplus and sqldeveloper also override the server's format with their own, but I found out how to change their defaults, so the problem is only with jdbc connections.

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Set nls date format in an after logon trigger

share|improve this answer

Thanks, that worked for me. The trigger that I inserted is this:

CREATE OR REPLACE TRIGGER LOGINTRG
AFTER LOGON ON DATABASE
BEGIN
EXECUTE IMMEDIATE 'ALTER SESSION SET NLS_DATE_FORMAT=''YYYY-MM-DD HH24:MI:SS''';
END LOGINTRG;
share|improve this answer
    
See stackoverflow.com/questions/283589/… on creating trigger for specific schema. – Vadzim Feb 6 '15 at 14:19
    
I tried this, it worked, but it slowed everything down to the point it was unsuable (select count(*) on an empty table taking several seconds !!!) – laurent Sep 17 '15 at 14:26
    
@laurent sounds to me like your problem is hiding elsewhere. We have been using this logon trigger in production with many clients for several years and there is no problem. – Yoni Sep 17 '15 at 19:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.