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Should I use <img>, <object>, or <embed> for loading SVG files into a page in a way similar to loading a jpg, gif or png?

What is the code for each to ensure it works as well as possible? (I'm seeing references to including the mimetype or pointing to fallback SVG renderers in my research and not seeing a good state of the art reference).

Assume I am checking for SVG support with Modernizr and falling back (probably doing a replacement with a plain <img> tag)for non SVG-capable browsers.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 86 down vote accepted

I can recommend the SVG Primer (published by the W3C), which covers this topic: http://www.w3.org/Graphics/SVG/IG/resources/svgprimer.html#SVG_in_HTML

If you use <object> then you get raster fallback for free*:

<object data="your.svg" type="image/svg+xml">
  <img src="yourfallback.jpg" />
</object>

*) Well, not quite for free, because some browsers download both resources, see Larry's suggestion below for how to get around that.

2014 update:

  • If you want a non-interactive svg, use <img> with script fallbacks to png version (for older IE and android < 3). One clean and simple way to do that:

    <img src="your.svg" onerror="this.src=your.png">.

    This will behave much like a GIF image, and if your browser supports declarative animations (SMIL) then those will play.

  • If you want an interactive svg, use either <iframe> or <object>.

  • If you need to provide older browsers the ability to use an svg plugin, then use <embed>.

  • For svg in css background-image and similar properties, modernizr is one choice for switching to fallback images, another is depending on multiple backgrounds to do it automatically:

    div {
        background-image: url(fallback.png);
        background-image: url(your.svg), none;
    }
    

An additional good read is this blogpost on svg fallbacks.

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3  
What's the right way to set a size? Do I include height and width atributes, or do I use CSS? –  artlung Dec 20 '10 at 12:26
3  
Using css is fine, or setting the size on the embedding element (that is: either of iframe, embed, object, img) - what the latter does is it may avoid flash-of-unstyled-content before the stylesheet that defines the size is loaded. Also make sure the svg has a viewBox attribute, and remove the width/height attributes from the svg root element. That will give you the best crossbrowser behavior in my experience. –  Erik Dahlström Dec 21 '10 at 11:57
5  
This method will always download the raster file. This answer ensures that the fallback is only requested on legacy IE browsers. –  Larry Oct 12 '12 at 12:22
3  
Note that the above does not work with the Adobe SVG Plug-in. But, you can get it all to work (modern browsers + ASV+MSIE) if you add <param name="src" value="your.svg" /> inside the <object> tag. I have spent a very long time trying to figure out how to do all that, and I think I've finally got it. –  Christopher Schultz Dec 5 '12 at 21:15
26  
What is the better approach in 2013? Has anything changed since 2010? –  Alexandr Kurilin Mar 27 '13 at 1:35

From IE9 and above you can use SVG in a ordinary IMG tag..

http://caniuse.com/svg-img

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This does not work if the SVG requires other resources to be loaded. (Fonts, images, ...) –  TheHippo Oct 18 '13 at 14:27
    
For a logo or icon I would still recommend using an IMG tag for semantical reasons and make sure the SVG is just a vector illustration. –  Christian Landgren Oct 18 '13 at 15:36

<object> and <embed> have an interesting property: they make it possible to obtain a reference to SVG document from outer document (taking same-origin policy into account). The reference can then be used to animate the SVG, change its stylesheets, etc.

Given

<object id="svg1" data="/static/image.svg" type="image/svg+xml"></object>

You can then do things like

document.getElementById("svg1").addEventListener("load", function() {
    var doc = this.getSVGDocument();
    var rect = doc.querySelector("rect"); // suppose our image contains a <rect>
    rect.setAttribute("fill", "green");
});
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I don't think you will get a "load" event from an <object> element. Not supported. –  Steve O'Connor Feb 5 at 15:35
    
@SteveO'Connor I don't know, maybe it's not well documented, but it certainly works in Firefox, IE11 and Chrome. At least with external SVG files: I couldn't make it work with data URIs. –  WGH Feb 6 at 8:00

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