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StringBuilder first = new StringBuilder();
StringBuilder second = first;

String str = "Love";

Is there a way to check if the variable "second" is Type Reference, whereas the variable "str" is of Type Value? I have been Googling around still can't get it, very new in C# here. I know there's second.getType() but that does not let me know if second is of Type Reference.

Thanks a lot.

Additional info

Here I wanna be frank here, I'm facing a programming test for C Sharp, of course it's an open book test because I'm not in an enclosed or restricted class :-) . I'm more familiar with PHP, C/C++, Perl, but very new in C sharp, but I love to learn about it. Here is their test. I have already filled out a few functions, only left out 2 or 3, those are ref and unref. If you see the code below I need to print out the Reference type in between < > in PrintSortedData function. The test question is at the code's comment. Maybe I haven't get the programming logic right yet.

/// The DataObject class stored with a key
class DataObject
{
    public string key = "";
    public int value = 0;
    // Populate
    public DataObject(string k, int v = 0)
    {
        key = k;
        value = v;
    }

}

class Program
{
    static Hashtable Data = new Hashtable();
    static string[] StaticData = new string[] { "X-Ray","Echo","Alpha", "Yankee","Bravo", "Charlie", 
        "Delta",    "Hotel", "India", "Juliet", "Foxtrot","Sierra",
        "Mike","Kilo", "Lima",  "November", "Oscar", "Papa", "Qubec", 
        "Romeo",  "Tango","Golf", "Uniform", "Victor", "Whisky",  
         "Zulu"};

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < StaticData.Length; i++)
            Data.Add(StaticData[i].ToLower(), new DataObject(StaticData[i]));
        while (true)
        {
            PrintSortedData();
            Console.WriteLine();
            Console.Write("> ");
            string str = Console.ReadLine();
            string[] strs = str.Split(' ');

            if (strs[0] == "q")
                break;
            else if (strs[0] == "print")
                PrintSortedData();
            else if (strs[0] == "swap")
                Swap(strs[1], strs[2]);
            else if (strs[0] == "ref")
                Ref(strs[1], strs[2]);
            else
                Console.WriteLine("Invalid Input");
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Create a reference from one data object to another.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="key1">The object to create the reference on</param>
    /// <param name="key2">The reference object</param>
    static void Ref(string key1, string key2)
    {

    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Removes an object reference on the object specified.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="key">The object to remove the reference from</param>
    static void UnRef(string key)
    {
        // Populate
    }



    /// <summary>
    /// Prints the information in the Data hashtable to the console.
    /// Output should be sorted by key 
    /// References should be printed between '<' and '>'
    /// The output should look like the following : 
    /// 
    /// 
    /// Alpha...... -3
    /// Bravo...... 2
    /// Charlie.... <Zulu>
    /// Delta...... 1
    /// Echo....... <Alpha>
    /// --etc---
    /// 
    /// </summary>
    static void PrintSortedData()
    {
        // Populate
        ArrayList keys = new ArrayList(Data.Keys);
        keys.Sort();

        foreach (object obj in keys)
        {
            Console.Write(obj + "......." + ((DataObject)Data[obj]).value + "\n");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
first, second, and str are all references. In this case first and second both refer to the same object. –  Gabe Dec 18 '10 at 7:36

3 Answers 3

Both variables are reference types. An instance of the object StringBuilder is still a reference type, as is an object of type string.

Value types in C# are either user-defined structs, enumerations, and numeric types (such as int, float, double, decimal, etc.) See the documentation on Value Types for more information.

Reference types are everything else, including classes, interfaces, delegates, and even some built-in types, like string and object. See the documentation on Reference Types for surprisingly not much more detail.


As far as your implicit question, how can you determine the difference between a variable that holds an object you've directly instantiated, and a variable that holds an implicit reference to that object, well, you can't. In C#, these are the same thing. Neither variable holds that object, but rather a pointer to that object (that is, an indirect reference to that object's location).

Of course, not to worry that there's no way to differentiate between the two, because they have exactly the same functionality. If you modify the object pointed to by either one, you also modify the object pointed to by the other.

share|improve this answer
    
"As far as your implicit question, how can you determine the difference between a variable that holds an object you've directly instantiated, and a variable that holds an implicit reference to that object, well, you can't." - Cody Gray , that's EXACTLY what I want to know. So is there an alternative way to that ? –  William Dec 18 '10 at 7:46
    
@William: Read the second paragraph. The functionality wasn't an omission, it simply doesn't make sense. The variables are exactly the same. If you modify the object pointed to by either one, the object pointed to by both of them is modified. The compiler/run-time doesn't care about which one holds the object you originally created; as far as it's concerned, there isn't a difference. Imagine that the objects occupy the same location in memory, like their street address. If I give two people that same address, they're both going to end up at my house. It's the sort of the same thing here. –  Cody Gray Dec 18 '10 at 7:50
    
Thanks Cody Gray. What I'm thinking is a Value Variable is like a land of a house, it REALLY hold the house PHYSICALLY, whereas the Reference Variable is like a piece of paper that have LOGICAL Address points to the address of the house, though. They both are at the the same location of course, the Land is the Physical, but the Address is the logical, but only the address can REALLY help us point out how to go to that Land. So I'm trying to know if I'm holding a paper address or a land ? See the additional info that I have added in my question above, to know why I need that. Thanks –  William Dec 18 '10 at 8:01

first and second are both references of type StringBuilder. They happen to be references to the same object; in other words, they have the same object identity. str is a reference of type String.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot Cody Gray has clarified my question even further, Cody Gray : "As far as your implicit question, how can you determine the difference between a variable that holds an object you've directly instantiated, and a variable that holds an implicit reference to that object, well, you can't. " –  William Dec 18 '10 at 7:48
    
@William, he's correct. You can't do that. Two references with the same object identity are indistinguishable. –  Matthew Flaschen Dec 18 '10 at 7:49
    
Thanks. Please have a look at the additional info that I have added in my question above, to know why I needed that. Thanks –  William Dec 18 '10 at 8:02

Here I wanna be frank here, I'm facing a programming test for C Sharp. I'm more familiar with PHP, C/C++, Perl, but very new in C sharp, but I love to learn about it. Here is their test. I have already filled out a few functions, only left out 2 or 3, those are

/// The DataObject class stored with a key
class DataObject
{
    public string key = "";
    public int value = 0;
    // Populate
    public DataObject(string k, int v = 0)
    {
        key = k;
        value = v;
    }

}

class Program
{
    static Hashtable Data = new Hashtable();
    static string[] StaticData = new string[] { "X-Ray","Echo","Alpha", "Yankee","Bravo", "Charlie", 
        "Delta",    "Hotel", "India", "Juliet", "Foxtrot","Sierra",
        "Mike","Kilo", "Lima",  "November", "Oscar", "Papa", "Qubec", 
        "Romeo",  "Tango","Golf", "Uniform", "Victor", "Whisky",  
         "Zulu"};

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < StaticData.Length; i++)
            Data.Add(StaticData[i].ToLower(), new DataObject(StaticData[i]));
        while (true)
        {
            PrintSortedData();
            Console.WriteLine();
            Console.Write("> ");
            string str = Console.ReadLine();
            string[] strs = str.Split(' ');

            if (strs[0] == "q")
                break;
            else if (strs[0] == "print")
                PrintSortedData();
            else if (strs[0] == "swap")
                Swap(strs[1], strs[2]);
            else if (strs[0] == "ref")
                Ref(strs[1], strs[2]);
            else
                Console.WriteLine("Invalid Input");
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Create a reference from one data object to another.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="key1">The object to create the reference on</param>
    /// <param name="key2">The reference object</param>
    static void Ref(string key1, string key2)
    {

    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Removes an object reference on the object specified.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="key">The object to remove the reference from</param>
    static void UnRef(string key)
    {
        // Populate
    }



    /// <summary>
    /// Prints the information in the Data hashtable to the console.
    /// Output should be sorted by key 
    /// References should be printed between '<' and '>'
    /// The output should look like the following : 
    /// 
    /// 
    /// Alpha...... -3
    /// Bravo...... 2
    /// Charlie.... <Zulu>
    /// Delta...... 1
    /// Echo....... <Alpha>
    /// --etc---
    /// 
    /// </summary>
    static void PrintSortedData()
    {
        // Populate
        ArrayList keys = new ArrayList(Data.Keys);
        keys.Sort();

        foreach (object obj in keys)
        {
            Console.Write(obj + "......." + ((DataObject)Data[obj]).value + "\n");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Not sure how this is exactly related to your original question. If you want to ask another thing, please create a new question. If you want to add something to your original post, use the 'edit' button, but please, don't post it as an answer below here. And I don't get it what you intend with your Ref function, but it seems this is probably not going to work. –  Doc Brown Dec 18 '10 at 8:03
    
Thanks Doc Brown, sorry for my ignorance, after I have added that then I realized I'm suppose to edit it instead of adding it. The reason why I add instead of edit is because in OTHER FORUM, I have tried to EDIT instead of ADDING a reply, I was scolded by a replier there saying something like "You have to make a reply INSTEAD of EDITING, so that people can see the Linear & logical Flow of the Conversation" But here is the opposite. But I will adapt the style over here. Also I'm very new in this forum here. Thanks. –  William Dec 18 '10 at 8:10
    
Ops, btw, that's still related to my original question and it's not a new problem. Because I'm trying to explain of why I need to determine if a variable is holding a real Object or just a reference. –  William Dec 18 '10 at 8:22

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