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In StringBuilder class I can do like this:

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
sb.append( "asd").append(34);

method append returns StringBuilder instance, and I can continuosly call that.

My question is it possible to do so in static method context? without class instance

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What do you mean by "In StringBuilder class"- you can't edit the class –  Mark Dec 18 '10 at 11:58
    
By static context do you mean to do somthing like StringBuilder.append()? If it is why would you want to do it? –  CoolBeans Dec 18 '10 at 12:02
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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Yes. Like this (untested).

public class Static {

  private final static Static INSTANCE = new Static();

  public static Static doStuff(...) {
     ...;
     return INSTANCE;
  }

  public static Static doOtherStuff() {
    ....
    return INSTANCE;
  }
}

You can now have code like.

Static.doStuff(...).doOtherStuff(...).doStuff(...);

I would recommend against it though.

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INSTANCE has to be static in this case. –  Sergey Tachenov Dec 18 '10 at 13:53
    
@Sergey, true, fixed. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Dec 18 '10 at 14:24
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You want the builder pattern on a static? No. Best to convert your statics to instances.

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This is called method-chaining.

To do it, you always need an instantiated object. So, sorry, but you cannot do it in a static context as there is no object associated with that.

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Do you want this ?

public class AppendOperation() {
    private static StringBuilder sb =  new StringBuilder(); 

    public static StringBuilder append(String s){
        return sb.append(s);
    }

    public static void main(String... args){

         System.out.println(AppendOperation.append("ada").append("dsa").append("asd"));

    }

}

maybe I don't understand the question (static context) correctly

do you mean this?

static {

} //of course you can do this, too

if not all above, you can't do without any static method because append() is not static

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