Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm really struggling with regex here. Using Java how would I go about replacing all spaces within quotes (double quotes really) with another character (or escaped space "\ ") but ONLY if the phrase ends with a wildcard character.

word1 AND "word2 word3 word4*" OR "word5 word6" OR word7

to

word1 AND "word2\ word3\ word4*" OR "word5 word6" OR word7
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think the best solution is to use a regular expression to find the quoted strings you want, and then to replace the spaces within the regex's match. Something like this:

import java.util.regex.*;

class SOReplaceSpacesInQuotes {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    Pattern findQuotes = Pattern.compile("\"[^\"]+\\*\"");

    for (String arg : args) {
      Matcher m = findQuotes.matcher(arg);

      StringBuffer result = new StringBuffer();
      while (m.find())
        m.appendReplacement(result, m.group().replace(" ", "\\\\ "));
      m.appendTail(result);

      System.out.println(arg + " -> " + result.toString());
    }
  }
}

Running java SOReplaceSpacesInQuotes 'word1 AND "word2 word3 word4*" OR "word5 word6*" OR word7' then happily produced the output word1 AND "word2 word3 word4*" OR "word5 word6*" OR word7 -> word1 AND "word2\ word3\ word4*" OR "word5\ word6*" OR word7, which is exactly what you wanted.

The pattern is "[^"]+\*", but backslashes and quotes have to be escaped for Java. This matches a literal quote, any number of non-quotes, a *, and a quote, which is what you want. This assumes that (a) you aren't allowed to have embedded \" escape sequences, and (b) that * is the only wildcard. If you have embedded escape sequences, then use "([^\\"]|\\.)\*" (which, escaped for Java, is \"([^\\\\\\"]|\\\\.)\\*\"); if you have multiple wildcards, use "[^"]+[*+]"; and if you have both, combine them in the obvious way. Dealing with multiple wildcards is a matter of just letting any of them match at the end of the string; dealing with escape sequences is done by matching a quote followed by any number of non-backslash, non-quote characters, or a backslash preceding anything at all.

Now, that pattern finds the quoted strings you want. For each argument to the program, we then match all of them, and using m.group().replace(" ", "\\\\ "), replace each space in what was matched (the quoted string) with a backslash and a space. (This string is \\—why two real backslashes are required, I'm not sure.) If you haven't seen appendReplacement and appendTail before (I hadn't), here's what they do: in tandem, they iterate through the entire string, replacing whatever was matched with the second argument to appendReplacement, and appending it all to the given StringBuffer. The appendTail call is necessary to catch whatever didn't match at the end. The documentation for Matcher.appendReplacement(StringBuffer,String) contains a good example of their use.


Edit: As Roland Illig pointed out, this is problematic if certain kinds of invalid input can appear, such as a AND "b" AND *"c", which would become a AND "b"\ AND\ *"c". If this is a danger (or if it could possibly become a danger in the future, which it likely could), then you should make it more robust by always matching quotes, but only replacing if they ended in a wildcard character. This will work as long as your quotes are always appropriately paired, which is a much weaker assumption. The resulting code is very similar:

import java.util.regex.*;

class SOReplaceSpacesInQuotes {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    Pattern findQuotes = Pattern.compile("\"[^\"]+?(\\*)?\"");

    for (String arg : args) {
      Matcher m = findQuotes.matcher(arg);

      StringBuffer result = new StringBuffer();
      while (m.find()) {
        if (m.group(1) == null)
          m.appendReplacement(result, m.group());
        else
          m.appendReplacement(result, m.group().replace(" ", "\\\\ "));
      }
      m.appendTail(result);

      System.out.println(arg + " -> " + result.toString());
    }
  }
}

We put the wildcard character in a group, and make it optional, and make the body of the quotes reluctant with +?, so that it will match as little as possible and let the wildcard character get grouped. This way, we match each successive pair of quotes, and since the regex engine won't restart in the middle of a match, we'll only ever match the insides, not the outsides, of quotes. But now we don't always want to replace the spaces—we only want to do so if there was a wildcard character. This is easy: test to see if group 1 is null. If it is, then there wasn't a wildcard character, so replace the string with itself. Otherwise, replace the spaces. And indeed, java SOReplaceSpacesInQuotes 'a AND "b d" AND *"c d"' yields the desired a AND "b d" AND *"c d" -> a AND "b d" AND *"c d", while java SOReplaceSpacesInQuotes 'a AND "b d" AND "c d*"' performs a substitution to get a AND "b d" AND *"c d" -> a AND "b d" AND "c\ *d".

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah that's great! I didn't know about appendReplacement/appendTail. I can't tell you how grateful I am to all of you for helping me with this. It was driving me nuts! Thanks all!!! –  Hjortur Dec 18 '10 at 15:23
1  
For the counterexample a AND "b" AND *"c" the above code does not work, since the regular expression cannot distinguish the inside and the outside of the quotes. Regular expressions cannot do everything, otherwise they wouldn't be called regular. –  Roland Illig Dec 18 '10 at 20:34
    
@Roland: Indeed they can't. Luckily, from the description of the problem, it sounds like input of that form is unlikely to occur. It would be possible to avoid that by simply always matching quotes, and then only doing the replacement if they ended in a wildcard. In that case, assuming valid input, this would work. –  Antal S-Z Dec 18 '10 at 21:16
    
@Roland: I've fixed the code to be robust against that problem by always matching quotes (so the regex never gets a chance to scan the outside of a match thanks to its "match all" procedure always forging ahead). I believe this is robust as long as quotes are always matched (which I don't think regex can check for, but it sounds like is being assumed), though if you think I've missed something, let me know. –  Antal S-Z Dec 18 '10 at 21:29

Do you really need regular expressions here? The task seems well-described, but a little too complex for regular expressions. So I would rather program it out explicitly.

package so4478038;

import static org.junit.Assert.*;

import org.junit.Test;

public class QuoteSpaces {

  public static String escapeSpacesInQuotes(String input) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    StringBuilder quotedWord = new StringBuilder();
    boolean inQuotes = false;
    for (int i = 0, imax = input.length(); i < imax; i++) {
      char c = input.charAt(i);
      if (c == '"') {
        if (!inQuotes) {
          quotedWord.setLength(0);
        } else {
          String qw = quotedWord.toString();
          if (qw.endsWith("*")) {
            sb.append(qw.replace(" ", "\\ "));
          } else {
            sb.append(qw);
          }
        }
        inQuotes = !inQuotes;
      }
      if (inQuotes) {
        quotedWord.append(c);
      } else {
        sb.append(c);
      }
    }
    return sb.toString();
  }

  @Test
  public void test() {
    assertEquals("word1 AND \"word2\\ word3\\ word4*\" OR \"word5 word6\" OR word7", escapeSpacesInQuotes("word1 AND \"word2 word3 word4*\" OR \"word5 word6\" OR word7"));
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much for your help. That solution worked a charm, but I also liked seeing the appendTail/appendReplacement combo! Thanks so much!!! –  Hjortur Dec 18 '10 at 15:24

Does it work ?

str.replaceAll("\"", "\\");

I don't have IDE now and I don't test it

share|improve this answer
    
This will not meet the requirements as the poster needs to selectively change spaces to slash + space. –  jzd Dec 18 '10 at 14:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.