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I learned that if I compile main.cpp the compiler simply replaces all includes with the actual content of the file i.e. #include "LongClassName.h" with the text in that file. This is done recursively in LongClassName.h. In the end the compiler sees a huge "virtual" file with the complete code of all .cpp and .h files.

But it seems to be much more complicated in real projects. I had a look at the Makefile Eclipse created for my Qt project and it seems that there is an entry for every file named file.o and its dependencies are file.cpp and file.h. So that means that eclipse compiles each .cpp separately(?)

Does that mean that class.cpp will know nothing about global stuff in main.cpp or a class in higher include hirarchy?

I stumbled upon this problem while trying to create an alias for a long class name. It is my main class and I wanted to call static functions with a shorter name: Ln::globalFunction() instead of LongClassName::globalFunction()

I have a class LongClassName whose header I include in main.cpp. This is the main class. All other classes are included in it.

LongClassName.h

#define PI 3.14159265

#include <QDebug>

Class LongClassName
{
...
public:
    ...
private:
...
};

typedef LongClassName Ln;

LongClassName.cpp

#include "Class1.h"
#include "Class2.h"
#include "Class3.h"

/*implementations of LongClassName's functions*/

So I assumed that when the code is included in one single "virtual" file by the compiler every class will be inserted after this source code and because of that every class should know that Ln is an alias for LongClassName

This didn't work

So what is the best way to propagate this alias to all classes?

I want to avoid including LongClassname.h in all classes because of reverse dependencies. LongClassName includes all other classes in its implementation. And almost all the other classes use some static functions of LongClassName.

(At the moment I have a seperate class Ln but try to merge it with LongClassName because it seems more logical.)

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If it's a Qt project, why the Eclipse is creating the makefile? –  Itamar Katz Dec 18 '10 at 13:54
    
I suppose it is running qmake internally. I have the Qt plugin installed. –  problemofficer Dec 18 '10 at 14:10
    
Thanks to both respondents. You helped me both and I learned a lot from your links and answers. Matteo Italia went into details of my questions so I accepted his answer. –  problemofficer Dec 18 '10 at 16:30
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In the end the compiler sees a huge "virtual" file with the complete code of all .cpp and .h files.

This is wrong. In .cpps you should include just the .hs (or .hpps if you like), almost never the .cpps; the .h in general just contain the declarations of the classes and of the methods, and not their actual body1 (i.e. their definition), so when you compile each .cpp the compiler still knows nothing about the definition of the functions defined in other .cpps, it just knows their declaration, and with it it can perform syntactical checks, generate code for function calls, ... but still it will generate an "incomplete" object file (.o), that will contain several "placeholders" ("here goes the address of this function defined somewhere else" "here goes the address of this extern variable" and so on)

After all the object files have been generated, it's the linker that have to take care of these placeholders, by plumbing all the object files together and linking their references to the actual code (which now can be found, since we have all the object files).

For some more info about the classical compile+link model, see here.

Does that mean that class.cpp will know nothing about global stuff in main.cpp or a class in higher include hirarchy?

Yes, it's exactly like that.

But why doesn't the Makefile created by eclipse simply compile main.cpp. Why isn't this enough? main.cpp contains all the dependencies. Why compile every .cpp separately?

main.cpp doesn't contain all the code, but just the declarations. You don't include all the code in the same .cpp (e.g. by including the other .cpps) mainly to decrease compilation time.

I want to avoid including LongClassname.h in all classes because of reverse dependencies. LongClassName includes all other classes in its implementation. And almost all the other classes use some static functions of LongClassName.

If you use header guards, you shouldn't have problems.


1. Ok, they also contain inline and template functions, but they are the exception, not the rule.

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The compiler knows how to compile a .cpp file (if it's a cpp compiler) into a .o file called 'object file', which is your code translated (and probably manipulated, optimized, etc.) to a machine code. Actually the compiler creates an assembly code, which is translated to machine code by the assembler.

So each cpp file is compiled to a different object file, and knows nothing about variables declared in other cpp files, unless you include declarations you want the object file to know about, either in the cpp file or in an h file it includes.

Although the compilation is done separately for each cpp, the linker links all object files to a single executable (or a library), so a variable declared in the global namespace is indeed global, and every declaration not explicitly placed in a named namespace is placed in the global namespace.

You will probably benefit from reading about all stages of "compiling", for example here: http://www.network-theory.co.uk/docs/gccintro/gccintro_83.html

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But why doesn't the Makefile created by eclipse simply compile main.cpp. Why isn't this enough? main.cpp contains all the dependencies. Why compile every .cpp separately? –  problemofficer Dec 18 '10 at 14:02
1  
The dependencies in the makefile just tells the builder which cpp files are needed to be re-compiled, if a given cpp file is changed. –  Itamar Katz Dec 18 '10 at 14:21
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