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I don't know much about regular expressions, but I got a string (url) and I'd like to extract the date from it:

var myurl = "https://example.com/display/~test/2010/07/06/Day+2.+Test+Page";

I'd like to extract 2010/07/06 from it, additionally I would like to have it formatted as 6th of July, 2010.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Depending on how the URL can change, you can use something like:

\/\d{4}\/\d{2}\/\d{2}\/

The above will extract /2010/07/06/ (the two slashes just to be safer - you can remove the heading and trailing \/ to get just 2010/07/06, but you might have issues if URL contains other parts that may match).

See the online regexp example here:

Here's the jsfiddle:

To format it, take a look e.g. here:

Something along these lines (note you need the function from above):

var dt = new Date(2010, 6, 6);
dateFormat(dt, "dS of mmmm, yyyy");
// 6th of June, 2010
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Hi icyrock.com, thank you for your swift response! Can you be so nice to provide an example on how to implement this regexp? Thanks! –  FLX Dec 18 '10 at 14:38
    
@FLX See the jsfiddle example in the edit –  icyrock.com Dec 18 '10 at 14:44
    
Thanks icyrock.com, but the date conversion doesn't work since it only accepts dates without 0's prefixing the day or month. e.g 2010, 7, 6 gets accepted, but 2010, 07, 06 does not. –  FLX Dec 18 '10 at 15:03
    
@FLX Take a look at the full working example in the updated jsfiddle: jsfiddle.net/zwkDQ/1. I am using Firefox, so if it does not work for you and you are using IE, try parsing the strings before (i.e. instead of p[1] write parseInt(p[1]) and so on). –  icyrock.com Dec 18 '10 at 15:13

Regex not required. A combination of split() and slice() will do as well:

var myurl = "https://example.com/display/~test/2010/07/06/Day+2.+Test+Page";
var parts = myurl.split("/");  // ["https:", "", "example.com", "display", "~test", "2010", "07", "06", "Day+2.+Test+Page"]
var ymd   = myurl.slice(5,8);  // ["2010", "07", "06"]
var date  = new Date(ymd);     // Tue Jul 06 2010 00:00:00 GMT+0200 (W. Europe Daylight Time)

There are several comprehensive date formatting libraries, I suggest you take one of those and do not try to roll your own.

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1  
Passing an array to the Date() constructor won't work across all browsers. In Internet Explorer, you'd have to use new Date(ymd[0], ymd[1] - 1, ymd[2]);. –  Andy E Dec 18 '10 at 14:53
    
@Andy: Thanks for the hint. As you might have guessed, I did not try it in IE. –  Tomalak Dec 18 '10 at 14:56
    
yeah, I did guess that :-) I always remember that Internet Explorer 8 and lower's Date parsing is very poor. I think it's improved in 9, thanks to ECMAScript 5. –  Andy E Dec 18 '10 at 14:58
    
Thanks Tomalak, but the date conversion doesn't work since it only accepts dates without 0's prefixing the day or month. e.g 2010, 7, 6 gets accepted, but 2010, 07, 06 does not. –  FLX Dec 18 '10 at 15:02
var myurl = "https://example.com/display/~test/2010/07/06/Day+2.+Test+Page";

var re = /(\d{4})\/(\d{2})\/(\d{2})/
var months = ["","Jan","Feb","Mar","Apr","May","Jun","Jul","Aug","Sep","Oct","Nov","Dec"];

var parts = myurl.match(re)

var year = parseInt(parts[1]);
var month = parseInt(parts[2],10);
var day = parseInt(parts[3],10);

alert( months[month] + " " + day + ", " + year );
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