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I remember once reading that there were at least two other alternatives invented roughly at the same time as the WAM. Any pointers?

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3 Answers 3

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Prior to the WAM, there was the ZIP by Clocksin. Its design is still very interesting. SWI-Prolog uses it. And also B-Prolog has slowly migrated from a WAM design towards the ZIP. Of course, on that way many new innovations were developed. Another alternative is the VAM.

A comparison as of 1993 is:

http://www.complang.tuwien.ac.at/ulrich/papers/PDF/binwam-nov93.pdf

In the meantime, the most interesting architectural developments are related to B-Prolog.

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In the technical note entitled An abstract Prolog instruction set, Warren also references another compiler by Bowen, Byrd, and Clocksin. However, he says that the two architectures have much in common, so I don't know whether that compiler could be really considered as an alternative.

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Not sure if this is what you mean, but the first two Prolog implementations were an interpreter written in Fortran by Colmerauer et al. and a DEC PDP-10 native compiler by Warren et al.

Warren mentions these in his foreword to Ait-Kaci's Tutorial Reconstruction of the WAM. If this is not what you mean, you may find it in that document or its references.

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The first Prolog implementation was written in Algol-W. The second was written in Fortran by Battani, Meloni. –  false Dec 21 '10 at 21:51
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@false, Warren apparently disagrees with you. What's the source for the Algol version being first? –  larsmans Dec 22 '10 at 0:06
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Thank you for the precise reference, let me quote it. On page ix it reads: "The first implementation of Prolog was an interpreter written in Fortran by members of Colmerauer’s group." –  false Dec 23 '10 at 11:58
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.. however, The birth of Prolog by Colmerauer and Roussel mention the Algol-W version. See, e.g. citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/… –  false Dec 23 '10 at 11:59
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I've setup a mirror of the WAM Book site at wambook.sf.net –  adamo Dec 23 '10 at 15:58

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