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I'm not a PHP developer, so I'm wondering if in PHP is more popular to use explicit getter/setters, in a pure OOP style, with private fields (the way I like):

class MyClass {
    private $firstField;
    private $secondField;

    public function getFirstField() {
        return $this->firstField;
    }
    public function setFirstField($x) {
        $this->firstField = $x;
    }
    public function getSecondField() {
        return $this->secondField;
    }
    public function setSecondField($x) {
        $this->secondField = $x;
    }
}

or just public fields:

class MyClass {
    public $firstField;
    public $secondField;
}

Thanks

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2  
After trying some code from the answers I used the code you're using in the question. How sad :-( –  sumid Feb 16 '13 at 1:08
1  
Developer don't be lazy, be clever: blog.flowl.info/demos/php-getter-setter-generator –  DanFromGermany Sep 23 at 11:31
    
thats amazing @DanFromGermany –  MadMax Nov 21 at 5:32

11 Answers 11

up vote 94 down vote accepted

You can use php magic methods __get and __set.

<?php
class MyClass {
  private $firstField;
  private $secondField;

  public function __get($property) {
    if (property_exists($this, $property)) {
      return $this->$property;
    }
  }

  public function __set($property, $value) {
    if (property_exists($this, $property)) {
      $this->$property = $value;
    }

    return $this;
  }
}
?>
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6  
I think you mean __get and __set. There are two underscores, not one. Here is the direct link to the right part of the page: php.net/manual/en/… (+1 for a correct answer) –  Computerish Dec 18 '10 at 15:41
9  
Whats the benefit against public properties, if there are no validation/sanitation? –  KingCrunch May 14 '11 at 0:06
3  
@KingCrunch, this is just an example. A very very dummy example for a powerful resource. –  Dave May 19 '11 at 1:07
6  
That's not really setter and getter. Typically I need for each property different implementation of getter! –  sumid Feb 16 '13 at 0:59
19  
Please don't : With magic methods you'll LOOSE almost every quality-related features, in many IDE (even vim) : auto-completion, explicit PHP inheritance, fast PHP interpretation & usefull PHPDoc generation & output. cf. stackoverflow.com/a/6184893/490589 –  Ronan Jul 1 '13 at 20:33

Why use getters and setters?

  1. Scalability: It's easier refactor a getter than search all the var assignments in a project code.
  2. Debugging: You can put breakpoints at setters and getters.
  3. Cleaner: Magic functions are not good solution for writting less, your IDE will not suggest the code. Better use templates for fast-writting getters.

direct assignment and getters/setters

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2  
If you use @property, your IDE will suggest the code (tested with PhpStorm 7) –  Alex2php Dec 13 '13 at 19:46

Encapsulation is important in any OO language, popularity has nothing to do with it. In dynamically typed languages, like PHP, it is especially useful because there is little ways to ensure a property is of a specific type without using setters.

In PHP, this works:

class Foo {
   public $bar; // should be an integer
}
$foo = new Foo;
$foo->bar = "string";

In Java, it doesn't:

class Foo {
   public int bar;
}
Foo myFoo = new Foo();
myFoo.bar = "string"; // error

Using magic methods (__get and __set) also works, but only when accessing a property that has lower visibility than the current scope can access. It can easily give you headaches when trying to debug, if it is not used properly.

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5  
Getters and setter doesn't bring encapsulation. Encapsulation == objects do something with its own data instead of giving them outside. Getters and setters are not a tool for enforcing type in dynamically typed languages like PHP. –  smentek May 13 '11 at 23:54
11  
@smentek: You're clearly missing at least half of what encapsulation really is. –  netcoder May 15 '11 at 6:48
    

Google already published a guide of optimization of PHP and the conclusion was:

No getter and setter Optimizing PHP

And no, you must not use magic methods. For PHP, Magic Method are evil. Why?

  1. Are hard to debug.
  2. Exists a performance impact.
  3. Add more code.

PHP is neither Java, nor C++ or C#, PHP is different and play with a different roles.

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2  
I tend to agree with that idea; that $dog->name = 'fido' is better than $dog->setName('fido'). When actually mutating a property (ex: $dog->increaseAge(1) I can build out the method that does the necessary validation and mutates that property. But not all actions really require mutation in that sense. –  Charlie S Jun 23 '13 at 6:37
    
The article doesn't say "don't", it's says 'naive setters and getters'. –  Brett Santore Jul 24 at 18:55

Well, php does have magic methods __get, __set, __isset & __unset, which is always a start. Alas proper (get it?) OO properties is more than magic methods. The main problem with PHP's implementation is that magic methods are called for all inaccessible properties. Which means you have to Repeat Yourself (eg. by calling property_exists()) in the magic methods when determining if name is actually a property of your object. And you can't really solve this general problem with a base class unless all your classes inherit from ie. ClassWithProperties, since PHP lacks multiple inheritance.

In contrast, Python new style classes gives you property(), which lets you explicitly define all your properties. C# has special syntax. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Property_(programming)

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1  
Calling property_exists, class_vars or array_key_exists (ie, checking if property really exists) is just a step in order to avoid a runtime fatal error. I'm not sure if not being displicent is the same as being repetitive in coding. –  Dave Dec 18 '10 at 16:13
1  
Fair enough. But in Python and C# this repetition is not needed. I think that is a strength. –  Emanuel Landeholm Dec 18 '10 at 16:19
class MyClass {
    private $firstField;
    private $secondField;
    private $thirdField;

    public function __get( $name ) {
        if( method_exists( $this , $method = ( 'get' . ucfirst( $name  ) ) ) )
            return $this->$method();
        else
            throw new Exception( 'Can\'t get property ' . $name );
    }

    public function __set( $name , $value ) {
        if( method_exists( $this , $method = ( 'set' . ucfirst( $name  ) ) ) )
            return $this->$method( $value );
        else
            throw new Exception( 'Can\'t set property ' . $name );
    }

    public function __isset( $name )
    {
        return method_exists( $this , 'get' . ucfirst( $name  ) ) 
            || method_exists( $this , 'set' . ucfirst( $name  ) );
    }

    public function getFirstField() {
        return $this->firstField;
    }

    protected function setFirstField($x) {
        $this->firstField = $x;
    }

    private function getSecondField() {
        return $this->secondField;
    }
}

$obj = new MyClass();

echo $obj->firstField; // works
$obj->firstField = 'value'; // works

echo $obj->getFirstField(); // works
$obj->setFirstField( 'value' ); // not works, method is protected

echo $obj->secondField; // works
echo $obj->getSecondField(); // not works, method is private

$obj->secondField = 'value'; // not works, setter not exists

echo $obj->thirdField; // not works, property not exists

isset( $obj->firstField ); // returns true
isset( $obj->secondField ); // returns true
isset( $obj->thirdField ); // returns false

Ready!

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If you preffer to use the __call function, you can use this method. It works with

  • GET => $this->property()
  • SET => $this->property($value)
  • GET => $this->getProperty()
  • SET => $this->setProperty($value)

kalsdas

public function __call($name, $arguments) {

    //Getting and setting with $this->property($optional);

    if (property_exists(get_class($this), $name)) {


        //Always set the value if a parameter is passed
        if (count($arguments) == 1) {
            /* set */
            $this->$name = $arguments[0];
        } else if (count($arguments) > 1) {
            throw new \Exception("Setter for $name only accepts one parameter.");
        }

        //Always return the value (Even on the set)
        return $this->$name;
    }

    //If it doesn't chech if its a normal old type setter ot getter
    //Getting and setting with $this->getProperty($optional);
    //Getting and setting with $this->setProperty($optional);
    $prefix = substr($name, 0, 3);
    $property = strtolower($name[3]) . substr($name, 4);
    switch ($prefix) {
        case 'get':
            return $this->$property;
            break;
        case 'set':
            //Always set the value if a parameter is passed
            if (count($arguments) != 1) {
                throw new \Exception("Setter for $name requires exactly one parameter.");
            }
            $this->$property = $arguments[0];
            //Always return the value (Even on the set)
            return $this->$name;
        default:
            throw new \Exception("Property $name doesn't exist.");
            break;
    }
}
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In addition to the already great and respected answers in here, I would like to expand on PHP having no setters/getters.

PHP does not have getter and setter syntax. It provides subclassed or magic methods to allow "hooking" and overriding the property lookup process, as pointed out by Dave.

Magic allows us lazy programmers to do more with less code at a time at which we are actively engaged in a project and know it intimately, but usually at the expense of readability.

Performance Every unnecessary function, that results from forcing a getter/setter-like code-architecture in PHP, involves its own memory stack-frame upon invocation and is wasting CPU cycles.

Readability: The codebase incurs bloating code-lines, which impacts code-navigation as more LOC mean more scrolling,.

Preference: Personally, as my rule of thumb, I take the failure of static code analysis as a sign to avoid going down the magical road as long as obvious long-term benefits elude me at that time.

Fallacies:

A common argument is readability. For instance that $someobject->width is easier to read than $someobject->width(). However unlike a planet's circumference or width, which can be assumed to be static, an object's instance such as $someobject, which requires a width function, likely takes a measurement of the object's instance width.
Therefore readability increases mainly because of assertive naming-schemes and not by hiding the function away that outputs a given property-value.

__get / __set uses:

  • pre-validation and pre-sanitation of property values

  • strings e.g.

    "
    some {mathsobj1->generatelatex} multi
    line text {mathsobj1->latexoutput}
    with lots of variables for {mathsobj1->generatelatex}
     some reason
    "
    

    In this case generatelatex would adhere to a naming scheme of actionname + methodname

  • special, obvious cases

    $dnastringobj->homeobox($one_rememberable_parameter)->gattaca->findrelated()
    $dnastringobj->homeobox($one_rememberable_parameter)->gttccaatttga->findrelated()
    

Note: PHP chose not to implement getter/setter syntax. I am not claiming that getters/setter are generally bad.

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More popular doesn't mean better. Using getters/setters is highly recommended but I think still more popular are public properties.

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There are many ways to create sourcecode in a netbeans-convention. This is nice. It makes thinks such easyer === FALSE. Just use the traditionel, specially if you are not sure which one of the properties should be encapsuled and which one not. I know, it is a boi.... pla... code, but for debugging-works and many other thinks it is the better, clear way. Dont spend to much time with thousend of arts how to make simple getters and setters. You cannot implement too some design patterns like the demeter-rule and so on, if you use magics. In specific situation you can use magic_calls or for small, fast and clear solutions. Sure you could make solutions for design-patters in this way too, but why to make you live more difficult.

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Validating + Formatting/Deriving Values

Setters let you to validate data and getters let you format or derive data. Objects allow you to encapsulate data and its validation and formatting code into a neat package that encourages DRY.

For example, consider the following simple class that contains a birth date.

class BirthDate {

    private $birth_date;

    public function getBirthDate($format='Y-m-d') {
        //format $birth_date ...
        //$birth_date = ...
        return $birth_date;
    }

    public function setBirthDate($birth_date) {                   
        //if($birth_date is not valid) throw an exception ...          
        $this->birth_date = $birth_date;
    }

    public function getAge() {
        //calculate age ...
        return $age;
    }

    public function getDaysUntilBirthday() {
        //calculate days until birth days
        return $days;
    }
}

You'll want to validate that the value being set is

  • A valid date
  • Not in the future

And you don't want to do this validation all over your application (or over multiple applications for that matter). Instead, it's easier to make the member variable protected or private (in order to make the setter the only access point) and to validate in the setter because then you'll know that the object contains a valid birth date no matter which part of the application the object came from and if you want to add more validation then you can add it in a single place.

You might want to add multiple formatters that operate on the same member variable i.e. getAge() and getDaysUntilBirthday() and you might want to enforce a configurable format in getBirthDate() depending on locale. Therefore I prefer consistently accessing values via getters as opposed to mixing $date->getAge() with $date->birth_date.

getters and setters are also useful when you extend objects. For example, suppose your application needed to allow 150+ year birth dates in some places but not in others. One way to solve the problem without repeating any code would be to extend the BirthDate object and put the additional validation in the setter.

class LivingBirthDate extends BirthDate {

    public function setBirthDate($birth_date) {
        //if $birth_date is greater than 150 years throw an exception
        //else pass to parent's setter
        return parent::setBirthDate($birth_date);
    }
}
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