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I have recently begun working on a project to establish how best to leverage the processing power available in modern graphics cards for general programming. It seems that the field general purpose GPU programming (GPGPU) has a large bias towards scientific applications with a lot of heavy math as this fits well with the GPU computational model. This is all good and well, but most people don't spend all their time running simulation software and the like so we figured it might be possible to create a common foundation for easily building GPU-enabled software for the masses.

This leads to the question I would like to pose; What are the most common types of work performed by programs? It is not a requirement that the work translates extremely well to GPU programming as we are willing to accept modest performance improvements (Better little than nothing, right?).

There are a couple of subjects we have in mind already:

  • Data management - Manipulation of large amounts of data from databases and otherwise.
  • Spreadsheet type programs (Is somewhat related to the above).
  • GUI programming (Though it might be impossible to get access to the relevant code).
  • Common algorithms like sorting and searching.
  • Common collections (And integrating them with data manipulation algorithms)

Which other coding tasks are very common? I suspect a lot of the code being written is of the category of inventory management and otherwise tracking of real 'objects'.

As I have no industry experience I figured there might be a number of basic types of code which is done more often than I realize but which just doesn't materialize as external products.

Both high level programming tasks as well as specific low level operations will be appreciated.

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6 Answers 6

I do a lot of simplifying of configuration. That is I wrap the generation/management of configuration values inside a UI. The primary benefit is I can control work flow and presentation to make it simpler for non-techie users to configure apps/sites/services.

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General programming translates terribly to GPUs. GPUs are dedicated to performing fairly simple tasks on streams of data at a massive rate, with massive parallelism. They do not deal well with the rich data and control structures of general programming, and there's no point trying to shoehorn that into them.

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I couldn't help adding a little bit of theory to the discussion: Problems which work well with GPGPU are typically in the complexity class NC: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NC_(complexity) –  pg1989 Mar 14 '12 at 17:32

General programming translates terribly to GPUs. GPUs are dedicated to performing fairly simple tasks on streams of data at a massive rate, with massive parallelism. They do not deal well with the rich data and control structures of general programming, and there's no point trying to shoehorn that into them.

This isn't too far away from my impression of the situation but at this point we are not concerning ourselves too much with that. We are starting out by getting a broad picture of which options we have to focus on. After that is done we will analyse them a bit deeper and find out which, if any, are plausible options. If we end up determining that it is impossible to do anything within the field, and we are only increasing everybody's electricity bill then that is a valid result as well.

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You might want to take a look at the March/April issue of ACM's Queue magazine, which has several articles on GPUs and how best to use them (besides doing graphics, of course).

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Link no longer works. –  Robert Harvey Sep 11 '11 at 5:17
    
Link repaired, thanks. –  David Singer Jan 20 '12 at 15:36

Things that modern computers do a lot of, where a little benefit could go a long way? Let's see...

  • Data management: relational database management could benefit from faster relational joins (especially joins involving a large number of relations). Involves massive homogeneous data sets.
  • Tokenising, lexing, parsing text.
  • Compilation, code generation.
  • Optimisation (of queries, graphs, etc).
  • Encryption, decryption, key generation.
  • Page layout, typesetting.
  • Full text indexing.
  • Garbage collection.
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The other thing to consider when using a GPU is the bus speed, Most Graphics cards are designed to have a higher bandwidth when transferring data from the CPU out to the GPU as that's what they do most of the time. The bandwidth from the GPU back up to the CPU, which is needed to return results etc, isn't as fast. So they work best in a pipelined mode.

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