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According to wikipedia a requirement for "standard-layout" is:

  • Has the same access control (public, private, protected) for all non-static members

Does not that preclude objects with public methods and private data from ever being standard-layout? What is the rationale for such a draconian rule?

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Does not that preclude objects with public methods and private data from ever being standard-layout?

No, the Wikipedia article has had the wrong wording. Only different access control for data members is mentioned in §9/6 of the FCD, which treats standard-layout:

A standard-layout class is a class that:
[...]
— has the same access control (Clause 11) for all non-static data members,

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Georg, Your final quote includes the text "non-static data members". My interest is in very simple classes in which all data members are private and some number of _function members / methods are public. My question is why should not such an object be treated as "standard layout"? – John Yates Dec 19 '10 at 1:14
    
@John: Sorry, i completely over-read that you talked about mixed access control for methods and data. Don't know how i missed that. – Georg Fritzsche Dec 19 '10 at 12:48

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