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I'm writing a sniffer for http packets with libpcap. Sometimes printing the content of the http payload I get strange characters.. do you know what could they be?

*xNT:���3�@�"P#1u`��$%S{M��

or

�~�tsE��}>a�����}/���`�▒�A�y

Thanks, for the answers.

If the header is in plain text so the problem is my code.

Anyway, can a POST request be coded in base64?

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Is it http/ssl traffic? –  Torbjörn Hansson Dec 18 '10 at 17:18
    
no pure http, no ssl –  cenos Dec 18 '10 at 17:22

3 Answers 3

In utils_http.c you have the following function:

static int handle_tcp(const struct tcphdr *tcp, int len)
{
  char buf[PCAP_SNAPLEN];
  memcpy(buf, tcp + 1, len - sizeof(*tcp));
  DEBUG("DANY TCPDs tcp string: %s",buf);
  if (0 == handle_http(buf, len - sizeof(*tcp)))
    return 0;
  return 1;
}

This is making the assumption that the TCP payload always starts 20 bytes after the beginning of the TCP header (always 20 because sizeof(*tcp) == 20). This doesn't take into account any TCP options. If you receive a packet with TCP options (which are very common), handle_http() will have the binary-encoded TCP options at the beginning of its buffer which might be what you're seeing.

Try something like this instead:

static int handle_tcp(const struct tcphdr *tcp, int len)
{
  char buf[PCAP_SNAPLEN];
  memcpy(buf, (void*)tcp + tcp->doff*4, len - tcp->doff*4);
  DEBUG("DANY TCPDs tcp string: %s",buf);
  if (0 == handle_http(buf, len - tcp->doff*4))
    return 0;
  return 1;
}

Or better yet, I have no idea why you're constantly making dozens of copies of your buffer every chance you get. You can just pass pointers around unless I'm missing something:

static int handle_tcp(const struct tcphdr *tcp, int len) {
  return handle_http((void*)tcp + tcp->doff*4, len - tcp->doff*4);
}
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The HTTP header Content-Type should tell you the type of payload. The HTTP headers should also say whether compression is used.

Compare what you get with http://web-sniffer.net/ or use something like Wireshark

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yes I was using wireshark, the problem maybe is in my code :( but it's very strange.. –  cenos Dec 18 '10 at 17:32

This is probably binary data that your display font has no characters for. HTTP does not necessarily transport text, it could be images or any other form of raw binary the client requested. Hard to say without seeing the rest of the TCP package.

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ah ok got it. Anyway, any HTTP header is always in plain text? or could it be encoded in some way? thx –  cenos Dec 18 '10 at 17:22
    
HTTP header is absolutely always plain text in ASCII encoding. –  R.. Dec 18 '10 at 17:22
2  
By the way, note that the binary data you're seeing might be an image or something, but it's also possible that it's text with a transport encoding like gzip. –  R.. Dec 18 '10 at 17:23
    
@cenos: Header fields cannot contain raw binary, because control characters are forbidden as per the spec. –  Tomalak Dec 18 '10 at 17:31
    
ok I got it. So I think there something wrong in my code.. because I'm able to see the GET requests but not the POST –  cenos Dec 18 '10 at 17:32

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