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I am currently working on simple java program that should be able to seek out computer in a local network that runs my second java application, all using UDP networking. One of those apps opens DatagramSocket and starts a thread that processes all of the inputs. The other application connects to broadcast address of current LAN network (e.g. 192.16.0.255), sends a packet and receives the response. I'm not very familiar with the way this works but here is what I'm wondering:

If I launch two of those responding applications each on different computer of the same network and run client application on other computer, which of those will it connect to? I thought it would connect and send packet to both but it connected just to one of them and sometimes not the same one.

Could you please explain this matter to me? I would appreciate it. Thank you!

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What exactly do you mean by "connecting"? There is no such thing for UDP, you just send a datagram to some address. Could you post some code that does the broadcasting? Datagrams sent to the broadcast address should normally arrive to both of the listening computers. –  Sergey Tachenov Dec 18 '10 at 18:32
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up vote 2 down vote accepted

If I launch two of those responding applications each on different computer of the same network and run client application on other computer, which of those will it connect to?

Neither, UDP is a connectionless protocol.

I thought it would connect and send packet to both but it connected just to one of them and sometimes not the same one.

UDP is a lossy protocol, sometimes the data will go to both, one or neither. Your router could be setup to try to direct the broadcast traffic, but usually it will attempt to send all packets to all listeners.

BTW: All the listeners must be on the 192.168.0.255 C class subnet. A host with an IP address of 192.168.1.1 may not see this packet.

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Of course it doesn't actually connect. As I understand UDP protocol will send datagrams separately throughout the network and some of them may not reach its destination or all of them. But if I have simple home network it's not a big deal and I tried to launch the application several times to see what happens and I was receiving only datagrams from one computer. btw the way I have my network setup is: PC_1 IP: 192.168.0.1; PC_2 iP: 192.168.0.16; Subnet mask: 255.255.255.0 and I was using broadcast IP: 192.168.0.255 –  Martin Dec 18 '10 at 20:34
    
I think I have it, I'm going to have to receive all incomming datagrams as I didn't realize that both of them are there but not everytime in the same order. Thank you for your time :-) –  Martin Dec 18 '10 at 20:49
    
Both PCs should see all packets. If you are using 192.168.0.1 for your PC, what are you using for your gateway/switch/router? If your gateway is the default (i.e. the same) that will confuse things. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 18 '10 at 20:51
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Another problem with UDP is that order is not guaranteed. Additionally packets over 532 bytes can be fragmented and then appear out of order and partially lost. Basically UDP sounds like a great idea, until you have to use it. TCP is well optimised and often the best solution. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 18 '10 at 20:53
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