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I want something like this:

public interface IAnimal
{ }

public class Dog : IAnimal
{
    public Dog() {}
}

public class Cat : IAnimal
{
    public Cat() {}
}

public abstract class TestClassBase
{
    public TestClassBase()
    {
        _lazyAnimal = CreateLazyAnimal();
    }

    private Lazy<IAnimal> _lazyAnimal = null;
    public IAnimal Animal
    {
        get
        { 
            IAnimal animal = null;
            if (_lazyAnimal != null)
                animal = _lazyAnimal.Value;

            return animal;
        }
    }

    // Could be overridden to support other animals
    public virtual Lazy<IAnimal> CreateLazyAnimal()
    {
        // default animal is a dog
        return new Lazy<Dog>(); // this type of casting doesn't work and I don't know a good workground
    }
}

I know from tinkering with MEF that it manages to find and store different types, implementing a single interface, into Lazy<T>. Just not sure how to do it myself.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Lazy<Dog> cannot be converted directly to Lazy<IAnimal>, but since Dog can be converted to IAnimal you can use the Lazy<IAnimal> constructor overload that expects an IAnimal (strictly speaking, it takes a Func that returns an IAnimal) and provide a Dog instead:

    public virtual Lazy<IAnimal> CreateLazyAnimal()
    {
        // default animal is a dog
        return new Lazy<IAnimal>(() => new Dog());
    }
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Casting Lazy<Dog> to Lazy<IAnimal> is not allowed because the types are different (the Lazy<T> type inherits just from object). In some cases, the casting can make sense - for example casting IEnuerable<Dog> to IEnumerable<IAnimal>, but the casting isn't safe in all cases.

C# 4.0 adds support for this casting in the safe case. It is called covariance and contravariance. For example, this article gives a nice overview.

Unfortunatelly, in C# 4.0 this works only for interfaces and delegates and not for concrete classes (e.g. Lazy<T>). You could probably solve the problem by creating interface ILazy<out T> and a wrapper for standard Lazy type, but it is probably easier to just write conversion from Lazy<Dog> to Lazy<IAnimal>.

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1  
No need to write a conversion from Lazy<Dog> to Lazy<IAnimal>; just explicitly use new Lazy<IAnimal>(() => new Dog()) (instead of having new Lazy<Dog>() automatically use the default constructor). –  Bradley Grainger Dec 18 '10 at 19:22
1  
I'm new to covariance and contravariance, and the concepts seem a bit baffling at first. From what I can tell, wouldn't it have made more sense for Lazy<T> to be defined as Lazy<out T>? –  mbursill Dec 18 '10 at 19:39
    
@mbursill: Yes, it would (in principle). The problem is that you can use out modifier only for interfaces and not for classes (it is not quite clear how that would work for classes in general). –  Tomas Petricek Dec 18 '10 at 21:33

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