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This is a hard algorithms problem that :

Divide the list in 2 parts (sum) that their sum closest to (most) each other

list length is 1 <= n <= 100 and their(numbers) weights 1<=w<=250 given in the question.

For example : 23 65 134 32 95 123 34

1.sum = 256

2.sum = 250

1.list = 1 2 3 7

2.list = 4 5 6

I have an algorithm but it didn't work for all inputs.

  1. init. lists list1 = [], list2 = []
  2. Sort elements (given list) [23 32 34 65 95 123 134]
  3. pop last one (max one)
  4. insert to the list which differs less

Implementation : list1 = [], list2 = []

  1. select 134 insert list1. list1 = [134]
  2. select 123 insert list2. because if you insert to the list1 the difference getting bigger
    3. select 95 and insert list2 . because sum(list2) + 95 - sum(list1) is less.

and so on...

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4  
Show what you have so that others can comment on where you went wrong. –  Vincent Ramdhanie Dec 18 '10 at 18:48
    
ok I'm now editing. However, I'm looking different and correct algorithm –  user467871 Dec 18 '10 at 18:49
2  
Did you look at stackoverflow.com/questions/890171/… ? –  Michael Dec 18 '10 at 18:57
    
I searched but I didn't find this question in SO. thanks –  user467871 Dec 18 '10 at 19:00
    
Whoops, I voted to close as exact dupe and now see that the question Michael suggested (while still highly relevant) has the additional constraint that the 2 lists be equal-sized. –  j_random_hacker Dec 19 '10 at 11:33
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem is NPC, but there is a pseudo polynomial algorithm for it, this is a 2-Partition problem, you can see the way of pseudo polynomial time algorithm for sub set sum problem to solve this, if input size is related polynomially to input values this can be done in polynomial time, if you have problem with relation of this problem to subset sum I'll explain it.

In your case (weights < 250) it's polynomial (because weight <= 250 n => sums <= 250 n^2).

Think Sum = sum of weights, You should create two dimensional array A, then construct A, Column by Column

A[i,j] = true if (j == weight[i] or j - weight[i] = weight[k] (k is in list).

The creation of array with this algorithms takes O(n^2 * sum/2).

At last you should find most valuable column which has true value.

This is an example:

items:{0,1,2,3} weights:{4,7,2,8} => sum = 21 sum/2 = 10

items/weights 0|  1  | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10    
  --------------------------------------------------------- 
  |0             |  0  | 0 | 0 | 1 | 0 | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0
  |1             |  0  | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 1 | 0 | 1 | 0
  |2             |  0  | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 1 | 0 | 0 | 1 | 1
  |3             |  0  | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 1 | 0 | 1

So because a[10, 2] == true the partition is 10, 11

This is an algorithm I found here and edited a little to do your approach:

bool partition( vector< int > C ) {
 // compute the total sum
 int n = C.size();
 int N = 0;
 for( int i = 0; i < n; i++ ) N += C[i];
 // initialize the table 
 T[0] = true;
 for( int i = 1; i <= N; i++ ) T[i] = false;
 // process the numbers one by one
 for( int i = 0; i < n; i++ )
  for( int j = N - C[i]; j >= 0; j--)
   if( T[j] ) T[j + C[i]] = true;

 for(int i = N/2;i>=0;i--)
    if (T[i])
      return i;
 return 0;
}

I just instead of returning T[N/2] returned first T[i] (in max to min order) which is true.

Finding the path causes to this value is not hard.

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Well done Saeed –  Jani Dec 18 '10 at 19:31
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You can reformulate this as the knapsack problem.

You have a list of items with total weight M that should be fitted into a bin that can hold maximum weight M/2. The items packed in the bin should weigh as much as possible, but not more than the bin holds.

For the case where all weights are non-negative, this problem is only weakly NP-complete and has polynomial time solutions.

A description of dynamic programming solutions for this problem can be found on Wikipedia.

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knapsack is "NPC-Strong" problem but this problem is just NPC (It' not strong), If you reformulate this as KNapsack you will create harder problem, It's like reformulate P problem to NPC problem (not exactly but it's like this). –  Saeed Amiri Dec 18 '10 at 19:41
    
@Saeed: For the special case where all weights are non-negative, the knapsack problem is not NPC strong. –  kotlinski Dec 19 '10 at 10:14
    
yes, So edit your first sentence, this problem is exactly known problem (2-Partition), and any reformulation may be causes ambiguity (like this) unless all things explain well. for example, Mark Byers, offered brute force which is wrong in this case when it can be done in polynomial time.(IMHO you made no mistake but may be causes to others mistakes). –  Saeed Amiri Dec 19 '10 at 12:09
    
@Saeed: You may have a point. On the other hand, partition problem (as you may know) is just a special case of the more well-known knapsack problem. So which attack path to take is largely a matter of taste. Personally I think it is easier to try to derive from the most general well-known problem possible. –  kotlinski Dec 20 '10 at 0:14
    
IMO NO, partition is NOT a special case of KNapsak (I didn't know where you read this or how do you think), may be "2-Partition" is "KNapsak with non negative weights", but general partition is very different, for example 3-Partition is a (first) problem to showing it's NPC-Strong and from this showing that 4-Partition is NPC Strong and from that showing 3-Dimensional Matching is Strong(now we have hierarchy of proof), and if you wanna say that X is special case of Y I can say it in reverse, but as I said If there is no good clarification, will be causes to ambiguity. –  Saeed Amiri Dec 20 '10 at 6:01
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This problem is at least as hard as the NP-complete problem subset sum. Your algorithm is a greedy algorithm. This type of algorithm is fast, and can generate an approximate solution quickly but it cannot find the exact solution to an NP-complete problem.

A brute force approach is probably the simplest way to solve your problem, although it is will be to slow if there are too many elements.

  • Try every possible way of partitioning the elements into two sets and calculate the absolute difference in the sums.
  • Choose the partition for which the absolute difference is minimal.

Generating all the partitions can be done by considering the binary representation of each integer from 0 to 2^n, where each binary digit determines whether the correspending element is in the left or right partition.

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brute force is not the answer in most algorithmic problems because the time is important. 2) Subset sum solution sounds good. I'll search it –  user467871 Dec 18 '10 at 18:58
1  
Please observe: In the case where all weights are non-negative, this problem is only weakly NP-complete, and has polynomial time solutions. Brute force is not a good idea. –  kotlinski Dec 18 '10 at 19:03
    
@hilal: You are right, it's not the optimal algorithm. I thought you were trying to find a correct algorithm. The knapsack approach suggested by kotlinski looks good. :) –  Mark Byers Dec 18 '10 at 19:04
    
@kotlinski @Mark I updated the tags and bounds :) –  user467871 Dec 18 '10 at 19:06
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