Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I read through a few of the discussions about the Towers of Hanoi problem. I understand the recursive solution using the following code:

void Hanoi3(int nDisks, char source, char intermed, char dest)
{
    if(nDisks == 1){
        cout << "Move the plate from " << source << " to " << dest << endl; 
    }
    else{
        Hanoi3(nDisks - 1, source, dest, intermed); 
        cout << "Move the plate from " << source << " to " << dest << endl; 
        Hanoi3(nDisks - 1, dest, intermed, source); 
    }
}

What I actually need to do is output some type of "illustration" of the towers at each step. I'm having a lot of trouble accomplishing this. Our instructor suggested using stacks to keep track of what disk is on what tower, but I'm having trouble outputting this as finding and outputting the values in the stacks requires popping off the top entries and deleting them. They become lost, if I understand it correctly.

Either way, it led me to some solution that starts off like this:

void Hanoi(int nDisks, stack<int> source, stack<int> intermed, stack<int> dest){
    if(nDisks == 1){
        dest.push(source.top()); 
        source.pop(); 
    }
    else{
        Hanoi(nDisks - 1, source, dest, intermed); 
        dest.push(source.top()); 
        source.pop(); 
        Hanoi(nDisks - 1, dest, intermed, source); 
    }
}

int main()
{

    int nDisks; 
    cout << "Enter the number of disks:    "; 
    cin >> nDisks; 

    stack<int> source, intermed, dest; 

    for(int i = nDisks; i >= 1; i--){
        source.push(i); 
    }

    Hanoi(nDisks, source, intermed, dest); 

    return 0;
}

I'm well aware that this is wrong. I'm not sure where a good place would be to populate source with the disk numbers. And I'm passing down the same size source stack each time. If someone could give me some direction or anything, that would be really cool. Thank you.

share|improve this question
1  
if u google tower of hanoi, or for that matter just think about it, you'll find simple non-recursive method(s) ;-) –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Dec 19 '10 at 2:02
    
I would, but I'm supposed to use the recursive method. Is that possible? –  d2jxp Dec 19 '10 at 2:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Pass a reference to the stacks:

stack<int>&

Also consider using a vector rather than a stack so you can iterate it to see the current content of the towers.

PigBen's answer also correctly identifies a bug in your code where you're not moving the disks from the intermediate tower to the destination tower.

share|improve this answer
    
Could you elaborate a little bit more? –  d2jxp Dec 19 '10 at 2:32
1  
This is homework, right? Read up a little on passing arguments by value or reference to understand why you're "losing" your changes to the stack. –  Guy Sirton Dec 19 '10 at 2:44
    
I just addressed your other question of one way of dealing with being able to examine the content of the stack - don't use a stack... –  Guy Sirton Dec 19 '10 at 2:50
    
Thanks for putting up with me. I get pass by value vs reference now. –  d2jxp Dec 19 '10 at 3:11

Pass the stacks by reference, and change the order you pass them in the last step so that you are moving from intermed to dest, using source as the intermediate.

void Hanoi(int nDisks, stack<int> &source, stack<int> &intermed, stack<int> &dest){
    if(nDisks == 1){
        dest.push(source.top()); 
        source.pop(); 
    }
    else{
        Hanoi(nDisks - 1, source, dest, intermed); 
        dest.push(source.top()); 
        source.pop(); 
        Hanoi(nDisks - 1, intermed, source, dest); 
    }
}

To display the stack, just copy it and pop from the copy.

share|improve this answer

Consider your original code:

void Hanoi3(int nDisks, char source, char intermed, char dest)
{
    if(nDisks == 1){
        cout << "Move the plate from " << source << " to " << dest << endl; 
    }
    else{
        Hanoi3(nDisks - 1, source, dest, intermed); 
        cout << "Move the plate from " << source << " to " << dest << endl; 
        Hanoi3(nDisks - 1, dest, intermed, source); 
    }
}

It's not correct, so that's possibly why your teacher suggests presenting the towers.

As you note, a std::stack is a good container to use to represent a tower's current disks, but as you also note, it's not entirely straightforward to get at the elements of a std::stack without popping them. You can pop them and push them down on another stack, and move them back, but that's intricate and silly, not to mention inefficient for the general case. That's why std::stack has a protected member c, the underlying container, that you can access by deriving from the class.

There are no virtual members in std::stack, so the only purpose of having a protected member is to make it slightly hard to get at. I think it's a bad design decision. But it's what you have, so,

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <stack>
#include <stddef.h>
using namespace std;

typedef ptrdiff_t   Size;
typedef Size        Index;

class IntStack
    : public stack<int>
{
public:
    Size count() const { return size(); }
    int at( Index i ) const { return c[i]; }
};

class Hanoi
{
private:
    IntStack    towers_[3];
    int         nDisks_;

public:
    Hanoi( int nDisks )
        : nDisks_( nDisks )
    {
        for( int disk = nDisks;  disk >= 1;  --disk )
        {
            towers_[0].push( disk );
        }
    }

    IntStack const& towers( Index i ) const { return towers_[i]; }
};

int main()
{
    int const   nDisksTotal = 2;

    Hanoi   puzzle( nDisksTotal );

    for( Index i = 0;  i < 3;  ++i )
    {
        IntStack const& tower   = puzzle.towers( i );
        Size const      nDisks  = tower.count();

        cout << "Tower " << i << ": ";        
        for( Index diskPos = 0;  diskPos < nDisks;  ++diskPos )
        {
            if( diskPos > 0 ) { cout << ", "; }
            cout << tower.at( diskPos );
        }
        cout << endl;
    }
}

Note that this code only illustrates how you can access the elements of those stacks.

The display can be made much more fancy, e.g. graphical.

I suggest you make your solver function a member of class Hanoi. And add a member function to display the puzzle state. Later you might want to turn that into a callback, in order to support a graphical user interface.

EDIT: hm, I see another answer has shown "the solution" for the bug. That removes the OP's learning experience and the whole reason for displaying the towers. This answer intentionally only affirmed that the bug is real, and showed instead what the OP asked for, namely how to display stacks, efficiently.

Cheers & hth.,

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for finding and talking about the bug in the right way; but I really think the proper way to deal with the stack interface not offering access to the other elements is to not use a stack. This wrapper is honestly of quite little use; all it really does is document your desire to use only a tiny part of the container interface - and we don't have that desire here. I'm not convinced that an OO approach towards the overall set of stacks is really helping to get the code written correctly, either. –  Karl Knechtel Dec 19 '10 at 4:43
    
@Karl: thanks. the reason that stack is appropriate (as the OP's instructor suggested) is that the recursive algorithm only uses stack operations on the disk towers, namely pop and push. if not using std::stack then would have to implement stack oneself, in order to display the states. simpler to just use the ready-to-use stacks provided by the standard library. :-) –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Dec 19 '10 at 5:02
    
The thing is, "implementing" std::stack consists of simply using .push_back(), .pop_back() and .back() on your favourite sequential container. The container adapter is designed specifically to restrict functionality that's already there. The simple way to get this effect is to just not use the functionality you don't want. (This principle can of course be taken to extremes: some languages don't bother with 'public' or 'private', because we're all adults and understand that accessing undocumented data members is naughty.) –  Karl Knechtel Dec 19 '10 at 5:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.