Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to get a module to import, but only if an object of a specific class is called. For example:

class One(object):
    try:
        import OneHelper
    except ImportError:
        pass
    def __init__(self):
        # this function doesn't use OneHelper
        ...

    def blah(self):
        # this function does
        OneHelper.blah()

This causes a NameError: global name 'OneHelper' is not defined when the One.blah() function is called. So far the only thing I have found that works is importing the module into the actual functions that use it. So:

class One(object):
    def __init__(self):
        # this function doesn't use OneHelper
        ...

    def blah(self):
        try:
            import OneHelper
        except ImportError:
            pass
        # this function does
        OneHelper.blah()

But I don't want to have to import the module in each function I want to use it in, I want it to be available to the whole class, but only if an instance of that class is instantiated. Apologies if I'm not being clear enough...

share|improve this question
    
You could try creating a function that imports the class if instantiated and then just calling the function from within the other functions. Small workaround maybe. –  a sandwhich Dec 19 '10 at 5:19
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The import OneHelper works fine in the class, making it a class attribute. You can verify this with dir(One) after defining your class -- there's your OneHelper attribute. One.OneHelper is a reference to the module. In an instance, of course, you may access it as self.OneHelper from your methods. (You could also continue to access it as One.OneHelper.)

share|improve this answer
    
of course, now i feel stupid lol :/ thanks for the insight! –  Paul Woolcock Dec 19 '10 at 5:27
    
Don't feel stupid... it is perfectly reasonable to assume that import always imports to the module's global namespace because that's what happens in 99.44% of uses. Of course, that's not actually how it works, but it's not an unreasonable starting point. I had to test it out myself to be sure how it behaves. Fortunately, when you're not sure, a little experimentation and inspection will get you a long way in Python. –  kindall Dec 19 '10 at 7:51
add comment

Import it on __init__ and attribute to some property:

class One(object):
    def __init__(self):
        try:
            import OneHelper
        except ImportError:
            self.OneHelper = None
        else:
            self.OneHelper = OneHelper
    def blah(self):
        if self.OneHelper:
            self.OneHelper.blah()

Your example looks funny because if the module fails to import what is the point of calling it later?

share|improve this answer
    
+1 you should almost never catch an exception and do nothing in the except block, and that goes double for ImportError, which you should almost never catch at all (i.e. only when you have a fallback of some sort). –  Karl Knechtel Dec 19 '10 at 6:10
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.