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If I have a list of chars:

a = ['a','b','c','d']

How do I convert it into a single string?

a = 'abcd'
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6  
Searching Google for "python convert list of chars to string" gives one hit on ubuntuforums for doing the inverse operation (string to char list), four hits on python.org of which only the last touches on the topic with the code string.joinfields(map(chr, list), ""), which isn't as good an answer as Daniel's, and the next entry is this very question on SO. It seems SO has become the FAQ. –  Mike DeSimone Dec 19 '10 at 6:42
    

11 Answers 11

up vote 182 down vote accepted

Use the join method of the empty string to join all of the strings together with the empty string in between, like so:

>>> a = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd']
>>> ''.join(a)
'abcd'
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1  
but what is there is space as character? –  vaichidrewar Jan 13 '12 at 4:17
1  
@vaichidrewar: Then there will be a space in the final string as well. –  Daniel Stutzbach Jan 15 '12 at 20:41
    
how can I add spaces between the characters? anyway to do it without iterating through the whole thing? –  clifgray Feb 8 '13 at 7:47
2  
just do ' '.join(list) with a space between the quotes –  clifgray Feb 8 '13 at 7:49
    
@NargothBond: 'a', "a", '', and "Hello, world!" are all strings. The first two strings are equal. –  Jace Browning Jul 10 '13 at 4:47

I found this syntax a little weird when I was beginning with Python:

"".join(['a','b','c','d'])
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This may be the fastest way:

>> from array import array
>> a = ['a','b','c','d']
>> array('B', map(ord,a)).tostring()
'abcd'
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Have you actually benchmarked this? I'd be really surprised if it was faster –  Winston Ewert Apr 7 '12 at 15:53
1  
@WinstonEwert yes, yesterday i was writing a program which needs to do such thing, and i benchmarked a few ways for the performance of this line counts in my program, the result shows it's about 20% faster then ''.join(['a','b','c']) –  bigeagle Apr 8 '12 at 7:05
1  
My own benchmark shows join to be 7 times faster. pastebin.com/8nSc5Ek1. You mind sharing your benchmark? –  Winston Ewert Apr 8 '12 at 14:10
    
@WinstonEwert You are right. I've found the reason for this: in my program I recv a list of int from network then convert to string where map(ord,a) is unnecessary, but join needs map(chr,a). Here's my benchmark pastebin.com/1sKFm8ma –  bigeagle Apr 8 '12 at 15:11
8  
Premature optimization. This is so much hard to read and understand what's going on. Unless the user NEEDS performance in the operation, a simple ''.join() is much more readable. –  Luiz Damim Oct 26 '12 at 10:24
g = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd']
f=''
for i in range(0,len(g)):
    f=f+g[i]
print f
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2  
-1, This is less clear and more verbose than the existing answers. –  Michael Anderson Sep 25 '12 at 7:11
    
+1 useful for me because I need to skip some elements of the list. –  steve Jan 16 '13 at 12:21
>> a = ['a','b','c','d']
>> str(a)[2:-2].replace("', '","")
'abcd'
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This is NOT the way to join a list. –  Luiz Damim Oct 26 '12 at 10:21
1  
-1 because you really don't want to see this in real code. Could give +1 for originality ... –  haavee Mar 27 '13 at 9:09
1  
This is so unpythonic that it hurts. –  plok Jun 7 '13 at 10:25
h=['a','b','c','d']
h=(h[0]+h[1]+h[2]+h[3])
h
'abcd'
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4  
What happens if the string is longer? –  Ben Oct 26 '12 at 9:53
    
this solution does not apply to every list in general but just to the one in the question used as example. I think nos was looking for a more applicable idea –  Ottavio Campana Oct 26 '12 at 9:54
    
@Bill: You did it if you want to be really funny –  biocyberman Feb 21 at 12:05
h = ['a','b','c','d','e','f']
g = ''
for f in h:
    g = g + f

>>> g
'abcdef'
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Sorry I don't know how to not have it show up all on one line; that is not the way I entered it. –  Bill Oct 26 '12 at 10:19
    
hit enter. also use the code blocks to make it look better. some explanatory text will improve your reception as well. –  dove Oct 26 '12 at 10:37
2  
@Bill Have a look at the formatting help –  oers Oct 26 '12 at 10:38
1  
This would be quite slow. Using ''.join(h) would far outpace your one-by-one append method. –  Martijn Pieters Oct 26 '12 at 11:34
    str = ''
    for letter in a:
        str += letter
    print str
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5  
@DanielExcinsky plus it's shadowing the str builtin... –  Jon Clements Nov 30 '12 at 14:29

If your Python interpreter is old (1.5.2, for example, which is common on some older Linux distributions), you may not have join() available as a method on any old string object, and you will instead need to use the string module. Example:

a = ['a','b','c','d']

try:
    b = ''.join(a)

except AttributeError:
    import string
    b = string.join(a,'')

The string b will be 'abcd'.

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+1 for making sure the answer works on older systems, although I don't like the whitespace before the round brackets! –  PhilMacKay Nov 8 '13 at 20:06

The reduce function also works

import operator
h=['a','b','c','d']
reduce(operator.add, h)
'abcd'
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It always bugs me that the operators aren't first class citizens in their own right. In scheme, for instance, that would be (reduce + h) –  Brian Minton Dec 24 '13 at 13:56
    
In scheme, (reduce + '' h) or (apply + h) would work. But then again, in Python, the add operator takes exactly 2 operands, hence the need for reduce. Otherwise, you could do operator.add(*h), since apply has been officially deprecated in Python in favor of the extended call syntax (aka en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Variadic_function) –  Brian Minton Dec 24 '13 at 14:03

use join with empty separator

h = ['a','b','c','d','e','f']
print ''.join(h)

or use reduce with add operator

import operator
h=['a','b','c','d']
reduce(operator.add, h)
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protected by Jon Clements Aug 21 '13 at 13:29

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