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In C# is there a way to detect if a string is all caps?

Most of the strings will be short(ie under 100 characters)

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In your loop, once you find a lowercase character then there's no need to continue as it's already failed the test –  Steve Kuo Jan 15 '09 at 19:55
    
What do you want the result to be when it sees a non-letter, e.g. punctuation or space? The ToUpper solution returns true; the question returns false. –  Jon Skeet Jan 15 '09 at 20:05
    
if(!Char.IsLetter(input[i]) || Char.IsUpper(input[i])) { etc } –  BrightUmbra Jan 15 '09 at 20:06
    
Similar to this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/234591/upper-vs-lower-case. Is culture going to come in to play? If so the accepted answer isn't correct. –  jcollum Jan 15 '09 at 20:07
    
For my purposes I need it to return true when non alpha characters are included. So I need it to be true when it evaluates ABC1 not false. I had tried both solutions and the ToUpper fit my needs better in this instance. –  StubbornMule Jan 15 '09 at 21:26

9 Answers 9

up vote 45 down vote accepted

No need to create a new string:

bool IsAllUpper(string input)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < input.Length; i++)
    {
        if (!Char.IsUpper(input[i]))
             return false;
    }

    return true;
}

Edit: If you want to skip non-alphabetic characters (The OP's original implementation does not, but his/her comments indicate that they might want to) :

   bool IsAllUpper(string input)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < input.Length; i++)
        {
            if (Char.IsLetter(input[i]) && !Char.IsUpper(input[i]))
                return false;
        }
        return true;
    }
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This solution is better than the accepted solution (IMHO) because it doesn't need to create an unnecessary string. It may be more lines of code, but that isn't always a bad thing. –  Jon Tackabury Jan 15 '09 at 20:05
    
You win some you lose some. I can't believe how many +1's the accepted answer has received. –  Greg Dean Jan 15 '09 at 20:11
    
Simplicity wins over optimization, in the absence of a reason to optimize. –  Robert Rossney Jan 15 '09 at 20:42
    
I agree, this answer is better than anything based on .ToUpper(). –  Brian Ensink Jan 15 '09 at 20:56
    
I believe this is a much better solution than the accepted one. –  mkchandler Jan 15 '09 at 21:02

Simple?

if (input.ToUpper() == input)
{
    // string is all upper
}
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I was all excited about getting an easy best answer, too bad you beat me to it :( –  Andrew G. Johnson Jan 15 '09 at 19:55
1  
This evaluates 'true' for strings like "ABC1" or "*!()@". I don't know the original posters context but this solution certainly returns 'true' for strings containing non-capital letters. –  Brian Ensink Jan 15 '09 at 20:55
    
Less code is better code. One way you're unnecessarily converting it to upper, the other way you're unnecessarily converting a simple == into a nine-line looping function. Optimize if profiling shows it's helpful. –  Chuck Jan 16 '09 at 8:40
    
I'd go with ToUpperInvariant() –  Dmitri Nesteruk Jan 16 '09 at 10:32

I like the LINQ approach.

If you want to restrict it to all upper case letters (i.e. no spaces etc):

return input.All(c => char.IsUpper(c));

or using a method group conversion:

return input.All(char.IsUpper);

If you want to just forbid lower case letters:

return !input.Any(c => char.IsLower(c));

or

return !input.Any(char.IsLower);
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1  
"XyZ".All(Char.IsUpper) –  Tion Sep 7 '10 at 20:11
    
@Tion: Indeed... editing. –  Jon Skeet Sep 7 '10 at 20:13
    
Looks like c => c.IsUpper(c) is no longer valid (in VS2013 at least): error CS0176: Member 'char.IsUpper(char)' cannot be accessed with an instance reference; qualify it with a type name instead –  Joce May 4 at 19:11
    
@Joce: That would never have been valid - it was a typo. Fixed now, thanks. –  Jon Skeet May 4 at 19:15

Make sure your definition of capitalization matches .Nets definition of capitalization.

ToUpper() in .Net is a linguistic operation. In some languages capitalization rules are not straight forward. Turkish I is famous for this.

// Meaning of ToUpper is linguistic and depends on what locale this executes
// This test could pass or fail in ways that surprise you.
if (input.ToUpper() == input) 
{
    // string is all upper
}

You could use

// Meaning of ToUpper is basically 'ASCII' ToUpper no matter the locale.
if (input.ToUpper(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture) == input) 
{
    // string is all upper
}

You may be tempted to save memory doing character by character capitalization

MSDN cautions against this

for(int i = 0; i < input.Length; i++) {
   if(input[i] != Char.ToUpper(input[i], CultureInfo.InvariantCulture)) {
     return false;
   }
}

The above code introduces a bug. Some non English 'letters' require two .net characters to encode (a surrogate pair). You have to detect these pairs and capitalize them as a single unit.

Also if you omit the culture info to get linguistic capitalization you are introducing a bug where in some locales your home brew capitalization algorithm disagrees with the the .net algorithm for that locale.

Of course none of this matters if your code will never run outside English speaking locales or never receive non English text.

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I would convert the string to all caps (with ToUpper) then compare that to the original (using Equals). Should be doable in one line of code.

return s.Equals(s.ToUpper())

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Use

if (input == input.ToUpper())
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If this needs to have good perf, I'm assuming it happens a lot. If so, take your solution and do it a few million times and time it. I suspect what you've got is better than the other solutions because you aren't creating a new garbage collected object that has to be cleaned up, and you can't make a copy of a string without iterating over it anyways.

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I think the following:

bool equals = (String.Compare(input, input.ToUpper(), StringComparison.Ordinal) == 0)

Will work also, and you can make sure that the comparison is made without taking into account the string casing (I think VB.NET ignores case by default). O even use String.CompareOrdinal(input, input.ToUpper()).

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In C# at least, == uses String.Equals() which is an ordinal comparison. –  Jon Skeet Jan 15 '09 at 20:18
    
VB.Net definitely does NOT ignore case for string comparisons –  Joel Coehoorn Jan 15 '09 at 20:21
    
Thank you Jon and Joel for the clarification then. –  Leandro López Jan 15 '09 at 20:24
    
I would like to know why the downvote. Was I that wrong? –  Leandro López Jan 16 '09 at 11:36

Regular expressions comes to mind. Found this out there: http://en.csharp-online.net/Check_if_all_upper_case_string

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1  
seems like overkill –  Greg Dean Jan 15 '09 at 20:29

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