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class complex
{
  float x,y;
public:
  complex(){}; //constructor with no arguments //what is use of giving such constructor
    complex(float z){x=y=z;}//constructor with 1 argument.
    complex(float real,float imag)
    {x=real;y=imag;}
    friend complex sum(complex,complex);
     friend void show(complex);
};

complex sum(complex c1,complex c2)
{
  complex c3;
  c3.x=c1.x+c2.x;
  c3.y=c1.y+c2.y;
  return (c3);
}

void show (complex c)
{
  cout<<c.x<<"+j"<<c.y<<"\n";
}
int main()
{
  complex p,q,r;
  p=complex(2.5,3.9);
  q=complex(1.6,2.5);
  r=sum(p,q);

  cout<<"p=";show(p);
  cout<<"q=";show(q);
  cout<<"r=";show(r);
  return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Not in this case, but you can set default values to the fields in it. –  khachik Dec 19 '10 at 8:18
2  
Note that it is usually a bad practice. You may end up with uninitialized objects if you forget to initialize them after construction, and then wonder what is going on. Better to initialize both fields to zero in the default constructor. The difference in performance is negligible. –  Sergey Tachenov Dec 19 '10 at 10:22
    
@Sergey: Not if you want an array with ten million complex objects :P –  kotlinski Dec 19 '10 at 11:26
2  
@kotlinski Use a vector<complex>, reserve(10*1024*1024), and push_back(), and it will be as fast as the (unitialized) array without the danger. Why use pure C when you are programming in C++?! –  Sjoerd Dec 19 '10 at 11:47
    
@Sjoerd: Especially in embedded programming, it can be nice to use static arrays (placed in the BSS) rather than allocating dynamically on the heap. –  kotlinski Dec 19 '10 at 12:02

5 Answers 5

When you declare a class without any constructors, the compiler provides a default constructor (on demand) that default-initializes the members. (Note that default-initialization on built-ins such as float does nothing). However, once you define any constructor for the class, the default constructor is no longer automatically provided. Hence you must define your own default constructor if you still want one.

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9  
The answer is correct but not complete. We don't have to define default constructor in general case, even if some other constructor is already defined. But we must do it if we want to use it. –  Dialecticus Dec 19 '10 at 9:11
1  
I have temporarily downvoted this for the reason @Dialecticus mentioned above -- namely that nobody must provide the default constructor. I will of course reverse my vote if this answer is fixed. –  Billy ONeal Dec 19 '10 at 11:27
    
@Billy: Fixed it. –  FredOverflow Dec 19 '10 at 11:55
    
@FredOverflow: Lol. -1 -> +1. –  Billy ONeal Dec 19 '10 at 11:57
    
@Billy: Why the LOL? :) –  FredOverflow Dec 19 '10 at 11:57

This is a codeified and corrected version of @user470379's answer

Consider the empty class:

class complex
{
    float x,y;
};

The compiler actually generates several functions for this class for you, even if they are not declared. The compiler generated functions make the class really look like this:

class complex
{
    float x,y;
public:
    complex(); //Compiler generated functions
    complex(const complex&);
    complex& operator=(const complex&);
    ~complex();
};

Now, you take your complex class, and you add your constructor taking a float. When you do this, you tell C++ that you do not want the compiler provided default constructor:

class complex
{
    float x,y;
public:
    // complex(); //No longer generated
    //Don't forget explicit here unless you want implicit conversions
    //from `float`
    explicit complex(float z) {x=y=z;} //User defined constructor
    /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
    //Compiler generated functions
    complex(const complex&);  //Note copy constructor and copy assignment
                              //operator are still generated.
    complex& operator=(const complex&);
    ~complex();
};

Now, whenever anyone wants a complex they must provide the float parameter. For example, the following code is now illegal:

int main()
{
    complex c; //ERROR! No default constructor available.
    complex g(4.2f); //Ok; float parameter specified.
}

If you want your user to be able to just construct a complex without supplying the float parameter, you must then explicitly create the constructor:

class complex
{
    float x,y;
public:
    complex() {} //Allow default construction of `complex` objects.
    //Don't forget explicit here unless you want implicit conversions
    //from `float`
    explicit complex(float z) {x=y=z;}
    ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
    complex(const complex&);  //Compiler generated functions
    complex& operator=(const complex&);
    ~complex();
};

Now the user can default-construct a complex object anywhere they please.

share|improve this answer
1  
@Billy: Perhaps add a comment (even though it's visible in the code) that the copy constructor is generated nonetheless ? –  Matthieu M. Dec 19 '10 at 11:20
    
@Matthieu M.: Good idea. Done. –  Billy ONeal Dec 19 '10 at 11:22
1  
x=y=z; should be x=z; y=0; to match the the usual mathematical approach. –  Sjoerd Dec 19 '10 at 11:30
    
@Sjoerd: Yes, that is correct. I just did that because that's what the OP's code is. (And actually, it would be better to use the initializer list than the assignments in any case) –  Billy ONeal Dec 19 '10 at 11:31
1  
You only need struct complex { complex(float x = 0., float y = 0.) : x(x), y(y) {} private: float x, y; }; to match 1) standard embedding of real numbers in complex numbers 2) the standard behavior of default-initialization of built in types. –  Alexandre C. Dec 19 '10 at 15:05

Because some programmers haven't upgraded their habits to modern standards.

Back in the old C days (pre C-99), one had to declare variables at the top of a block, and thus declaration and initialisation were frequently separated.

In modern C++, there is barely ever a good reason not to declare and initialize in the same statement.

As a result, it should be an exception and not the rule to provide a default constructor.

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2  
While in general I agree that providing the empty default constructor for the sole purpose of allowing definitions at the top of the block is bad (+1), there are plenty of cases to define one even without this. For example, if someone wants any of the standard container resize() methods to work. Additionally, there are plenty of cases where it makes sense to define a default value (For example, in complex that should probably be 0.0f), in which cases a default constructor should be provided. –  Billy ONeal Dec 19 '10 at 11:56
    
@Billy There aren't that many cases where a default constructor has a logically sound interpretation; complex is one of the exceptions. And even in the case of complex, I prefer complex c = 0; over complex c;. YMMV. –  Sjoerd Dec 19 '10 at 13:01

While I agree with the fact that default constructors should be frowned upon if there is no canonical meaning to them (complex numbers should have a default constructor that makes them zero, to mimic built in types semantics), there are a few scenarios where they are mandatory. Quite a few standard library constructs mandate default constructible objects, especially iterators and containers' value types (at least for some methods: resize for instance).

Sometimes, you may want objects (or are forced by the standard to want) to have a "null" state, which is only reachable by a default constructor. Then you have to write safe bool idioms, use smart pointers and pimpl idioms, etc. This can be good, or not.

I agree, it is not good practice to add the complexity of null states (and the errors they can induce) to objects which don't need them, but sometimes, you are forced to.

For the record, complex classes should look like:

struct complex
{
    // Allow default initialization, and standard embedding
    // of real numbers in complex numbers
    complex(float real = 0., float imag = 0.) 
        : real(real), imag(imag) 
    {}

    float real, imag; // no need for privacy here
};

// Operators are defined outside the class
complex operator+(complex x, complex y) 
{
    return complex(x.real + y.real, x.imag + y.imag);
}

// etc

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, complex x)
{
    return os << x.real << " + i" << x.imag;
}

Note that since complex is a POD type, you should even be able to do complex x = { 2., 3. }; and have them zero-initialized for you in static arrays.

share|improve this answer
    
According to C++98, complex is not a POD: It has a user-defined constructor. Yes, I agree that is overly restrictive, and so do the experts: In the new C++0x, I believe it is a POD (or whatever it is called in that standard). I guess you're relying on a gcc-extension for complex x = { 2., 3. };. –  Sjoerd Dec 20 '10 at 1:49
    
Another small nitpic: the operators should use const complex&. Although I guess the compiler will optimize away all copies anyway. But I agree on the general approach (so +1). –  Sjoerd Dec 20 '10 at 1:55
    
@sjoerd: passing by value or by reference is likely to yield exactly the same code here. –  Alexandre C. Dec 20 '10 at 8:05

Working with the C++ Standard Library usually requries your classes to have no-arg constructor (like in: vector<complex> vc(6);).

Creating arrays either stack-allocated (complex arcmpl[20];) or dynamically allocated (complex * dynarcmplx = new complex[n];) as well calls no-arg constructors.

As it was said before, if you define any constructor for your class, you have no more (compiler generated no-arg) “default constructor” and in this case if you want to write something like I mentioned above, you should provide your own no-arg constructor.

share|improve this answer
    
All the examples you give, have problems associated with them: Stack allocated arrays are rare as they cannot have a dynamic determined size; new[] has exception-safety problems (if you solve them correctly, you'll have remade half of std::vector). And making explicit the values to which your vector is initialized is a good practice: vector<complex> vc(6, complex(0,0)); –  Sjoerd Dec 20 '10 at 1:43

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