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Dear all, I've a program in C++ that should be as fast as possible. In particular, there is a crucial part that works as follows:

There is a variable D ranging in [0,255], based on its value it calls the function whose pointer is stored in a array F (with 255 elements). i.e., F[D] gives the pointer to the function to call. The functions are very simple, they execute few expressions or/and assignments (no cycles).

How can I do this faster?

I can replicate the code in the functions. I do not need features of functions call (I'm using them since it was simpler way to do). My goal is that of removing the inefficiencies due to calls of functions.

I consider to use Switch/case. The code of each case is the code of the corresponding function. Is there a faster way to do it?

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1  
it seems unlikely that this would make any difference to performance. Have you done any profiling? –  David Heffernan Dec 19 '10 at 10:27
    
@David: To me it seems really likely that inlining busy, small functions will make a difference to performance. –  Johan Kotlinski Dec 19 '10 at 10:55
1  
@kotlinski: The problem is that you can't really inline them. Sure, you can inline them in the context of the switch, but that's still not inline, because the switch isn't going to be inlined. –  Billy ONeal Dec 19 '10 at 11:00
1  
@Billy: If the switch is only used in one place in a program (e.g. inside a loop) it may very well be inlined. –  Johan Kotlinski Dec 19 '10 at 11:08
    
Even if the switch is used in several spots, you could wrap a __forceinline version in a normal function and use the fast,big version in the critical loop and the slower, smaller version everywhere else. However, beware premature optimization... –  Eamon Nerbonne Dec 19 '10 at 17:23

4 Answers 4

A switch/case may be faster, as the compiler can make more specific optimizations, and there are other things like code locality compared to calling a function pointer. However, it's unlikely that you'll notice a substantial performance increase.

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+1 for pointing out cache locality, which I did not consider. –  Billy ONeal Dec 19 '10 at 10:45
  • Convert it to a switch
  • Make sure the tiny functions can be inlined (how to do this is compiler dependant - but explicitly marking them inline and placing them in the compilation unit is a good bet)
  • Finally, you might try profile-guided optimizations if (as seems quite possible) your switch statement calls the branches in a non-uniform fashion.

The aim is to avoid function-call overhead and have the compiler reorder the switch statement to reduce the number of branches typically encountered.

Edit: since there's some skeptical voices as to how much this helps; I gave it a shot. In the following program, the function-pointer loop needs 1.07 seconds, and the inlined switch statement takes 0.79 seconds on my machine - YMMV:

template<unsigned n0,unsigned n> struct F { static inline unsigned func(unsigned val); };

template<unsigned n> struct F<0,n> { static inline unsigned func(unsigned val) { return val + n;} };
template<unsigned n> struct F<1,n> { static inline unsigned func(unsigned val) { return val - n; } };
template<unsigned n> struct F<2,n> { static inline unsigned func(unsigned val) { return val ^ n; } };
template<unsigned n> struct F<3,n> { static inline unsigned func(unsigned val) { return val * n; } };
template<unsigned n> struct F<4,n> { static inline unsigned func(unsigned val) { return (val << ( n %16)) + n*(n&0xff); } };
template<unsigned n> struct F<5,n> { static inline unsigned func(unsigned val) { return (val >> ( n %16)) + (n*(n&0xff) << 16); } };
template<unsigned n> struct F<6,n> { static inline unsigned func(unsigned val) { return val / (n|1) + val; } };
template<unsigned n> struct F<7,n> { static inline unsigned func(unsigned val) { return (val <<16) + (val>>16); } };

template<unsigned n> struct f { static inline unsigned func(unsigned val) { return F<n%8,n>::func(val); } };

typedef unsigned (*fPtr)(unsigned);

fPtr funcs[256];

template<unsigned n0,unsigned n1> inline void fAssign() { 
    if(n0==n1-1 || n0==n1) //||n0==n1 just to avoid compiler warning
        funcs[n0] = f<n0>::func;
    else {
        fAssign<n0,(n0 + n1)/2>();
        fAssign<(n0 + n1)/2,n1>();
    }
}

__forceinline unsigned funcSwitch(unsigned char type,unsigned val);//huge function elided

__declspec(noinline) unsigned doloop(unsigned val,unsigned start,unsigned end) {
    for(unsigned x=start;x<end;++x)
        val = funcs[x*37&0xff](val);
    return val;
}

__declspec(noinline) unsigned doloop2(unsigned val,unsigned start,unsigned end) {
    for(unsigned x=start;x<end;++x)
        val = funcSwitch(x*37&0xff,val);
    return val;
}

I verified that all function calls are inlined except those to doloop, doloop2 and funcs[?] to ensure I'm not measuring odd compiler choices. So, on this machine, with MSC 10, this (thoroughly artifical) benchmark shows that the huge-switch version is a third faster than the function-pointer lookup-based version. PGO slowed both versions down; probably because they're too small to exhibit cache effects and the program is small enough to be fully inlined/optimized even without PGO.

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So you might lose the small inefficiency of the indirect call, and you gain the huge inefficiency of hashing/binary searching/linear scanning the switch. –  Billy ONeal Dec 19 '10 at 10:42
4  
@Billy: Last time I checked, compilers are perfectly capable of converting switch/case into an assembler jump table. –  Puppy Dec 19 '10 at 10:44
    
@DeadMG: Okay, so you save a single pointer dereference, and pushing the instruction pointer to the stack, if it can be converted into a jump table, and if all of the operations can be inlined. –  Billy ONeal Dec 19 '10 at 10:54
    
If your operations are trivial (as the OP says) a pointer dereference can be a relatively big deal. –  Eamon Nerbonne Dec 19 '10 at 11:14
1  
Yeah, it's a weird scenario. The OP hasn't clarified why he needs this, unfortunately - maybe it's some encoding thing with a specced distinction by case, but it's sure odd. –  Eamon Nerbonne Dec 21 '10 at 13:14

You're not going to beat the lookup table based indirect call with any other method, including switch. Switch is going to take at best logarithmic time (well, it might hash to get constant time, but that'll likely be slower than logarithmic time with ints for most input sizes).

This is assuming your code looks like this:

typedef void (*myProc_t)();

myProc_t functionArray[255] = { ... };

void CallSomepin(unsigned char D)
{
    functionArray[D]();
}

If you're creating the array each time the function is called however, it might be a good idea to amortize the cost of the construction by doing the initialization of the function array once, rather than every time.

EDIT: That said, the best way to avoid the inefficiency of the indirect call is simply to not do it. Look at your code and see if there are places you can replace the indirect lookup based call with a direct call.

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2  
You can't know that. It might; after all, that enables inlining which (since the functions are trivial) could matter a lot. And once it's been inlined into a compiler-internal spagetti monster, further simplifications may become apparent to the compierl. –  Eamon Nerbonne Dec 19 '10 at 10:30
    
@Eamon: Any benefit you get from inlining is going to be lost to lookup time. –  Billy ONeal Dec 19 '10 at 10:32
    
The array of functions is static and known at compile time. I asked the question since in my mind the whole could be done faster in assembler. –  user547616 Dec 19 '10 at 10:34
    
@Billy Sorry. my comment was incomplete. I edited it. –  user547616 Dec 19 '10 at 10:38
2  
@user547616: No. switch/case compiles into a jump table like that in assembler. –  Puppy Dec 19 '10 at 10:43

There is a variable D ranging in [0,255], based on its value it calls the function whose pointer is stored in a array F (with 255 elements)

Warning, this will result in a buffer overflow if D has the value 255.

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Yes it was a typo. Array F has 256 elements. –  user547616 Dec 19 '10 at 13:32

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