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What is __init__.py for in a python source directory?

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Please edit the title: init.py -> init.py –  codeape Jan 15 '09 at 20:15
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Sorry, I can't see the difference. <underscore> <underscore> "init.py" <underscore> <underscore>, no? –  Mat Jan 15 '09 at 20:19
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The underscores are before the py extension. –  Epitaph Jan 15 '09 at 20:23
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Duh, I've just been sitting here flicking through the history of my original and NXC's changed version and I still couldn't see it! –  Mat Jan 15 '09 at 20:25
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7 Answers

up vote 236 down vote accepted

It's a part of a package. Here's the documentation.

The __init__.py files are required to make Python treat the directories as containing packages; this is done to prevent directories with a common name, such as string, from unintentionally hiding valid modules that occur later on the module search path. In the simplest case, __init__.py can just be an empty file, but it can also execute initialization code for the package or set the __all__ variable, described later.

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What does this mean: "this is done to prevent directories with a common name, such as string, from unintentionally hiding valid modules that occur later on the module search path"? –  Carl G Jan 25 at 4:43
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@CarlG Python searches a list of directories to resolve names in, e.g., import statements. Because these can be any directory, and arbitrary ones can be added by the end user, the developers have to worry about directories that happen to share a name with a valid Python module, such as 'string' in the docs example. To alleviate this, it ignores directories which do not contain a file named _ _ init _ _.py (no spaces), even if it is blank. –  Two-Bit Alchemist Mar 7 at 20:56
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@CarlG Try this. Make a directory called 'datetime' and in it make two blank files, the init.py file (with underscores) and datetime.py. Now open an interpreter, import sys, and issue sys.path.insert(0, '/path/to/datetime'), replacing that path with the path to whatever directory you just made. Now try something like from datetime import datetime;datetime.now(). You should get an AttributeError (because it is importing your blank file now). If you were to repeat these steps without creating the blank init file, this would not happen. That's what it's intended to prevent. –  Two-Bit Alchemist Mar 7 at 21:03
    
@Two-BitAlchemist Using from/import it shows ImportError: cannot import name 'datetime' in both cases (with and without __init__.py). ps. Using Python 3.4 with IDLE. –  Darek Nędza May 5 at 18:27
    
@DarekNędza You've got something set up incorrectly if you can't just open a Python interpreter and issue from datetime import datetime without error. That's good all the way back to version 2.3! –  Two-Bit Alchemist May 5 at 20:10
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Files named __init__.py are used to mark directories on disk as Python package directories. If you have the files

mydir/spam/__init__.py
mydir/spam/module.py

and mydir is on your path, you can import the code in module.py as

import spam.module

or

from spam import module

If you remove the __init__.py file, Python will no longer look for submodules inside that directory, so attempts to import the module will fail.

The __init__.py file is usually empty, but can be used to export selected portions of the package under more convenient name, hold convenience functions, etc. Given the example above, the contents of the init module can be accessed as

import spam

based on http://effbot.org/pyfaq/what-is-init-py-used-for.htm

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The __init__.py file makes Python treat directories containing it as modules.

Furthermore, this is the first file to be loaded in a module, so you can use it to execute code that you want to run each time a module is loaded, or specify the submodules to be exported.

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In addition to labeling a directory as a Python package and defining __all__, __init__.py allows you to define any variable at the package level. Doing so is often convenient if a package defines something that will be imported frequently, in an API-like fashion. This pattern promotes adherence to the Pythonic "flat is better than nested" philosophy.

An example

Here is an example from one of my projects, in which I frequently import a sessionmaker called Session to interact with my database. I wrote a "database" package with a few modules:

database/
    __init__.py
    schema.py
    insertions.py
    queries.py

My __init__.py contains the following code:

import os

from sqlalchemy.orm import sessionmaker
from sqlalchemy import create_engine

engine = create_engine(os.environ['DATABASE_URL'])
Session = sessionmaker(bind=engine)

Since I define Session here, I can start a new session using the syntax below. This code would be the same executed from inside or outside of the "database" package directory.

from database import Session
session = Session()

Of course, this is a small convenience -- the alternative would be to define Session in a new file like "create_session.py" in my database package, and start new sessions using:

from database.create_session import Session
session = Session()

Further reading

There is a pretty interesting reddit thread covering appropriate uses of __init__.py here:

http://www.reddit.com/r/Python/comments/1bbbwk/whats_your_opinion_on_what_to_include_in_init_py/

The majority opinion seems to be that __init__.py files should be very thin to avoid violating the "explicit is better than implicit" philosophy.

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This should definitely have been the accepted answer! +1 –  Indradhanush Gupta Mar 13 at 18:08
    
This is much more helpful than the higher answers, since it actually gives explanations/examples instead of documentation. Thanks! –  br1ckb0t 2 days ago
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A good explanation for the usage of __init__.py is provided here http://mikegrouchy.com/blog/2012/05/be-pythonic-__init__py.html

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It facilitates importing other python files. When you placed this file in a directory (say stuff)containing other py files, then you can do something like import stuff.other.

root\
    stuff\
         other.py

    morestuff\
         another.py

Without this __init__.py inside the directory stuff, you couldn't import other.py, because Python doesn't know where the source code for stuff is and unable to recognize it as a package.

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In Python the definition of package is very simple. Like Java the hierarchical structure and the directory structure are the same. But you have to have __init__.py in a package. I will explain the __init__.py file with the example below:

package_x/
|--  __init__.py
|--    subPackage_a/
|------  __init__.py
|------  module_m1.py
|--    subPackage_b/
|------  __init__.py
|------  module_n1.py
|------  module_n2.py
|------  module_n3.py

__init__.py can be empty, as long as it exists. It indicates that the directory should be regarded as a package. Of course, __init__.py can also set the appropriate content.

If we add a function in module_n1:

def function_X():
    print "function_X in module_n1"
    return

After running:

>>>from package_x.subPackage_b.module_n1 import function_X
>>>function_X()

function_X in module_n1 

Then we followed the hierarchy package and called module_n1 the function. We can use __init__.py in subPackage_b like this:

__all__ = ['module_n2', 'module_n3']

After running:

>>>from package_x.subPackage_b import * 
>>>module_n1.function_X()

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ImportError: No module named module_n1

Hence using * importing, module package is subject to __init__.py content.

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