Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have created the following grammar: I would like some idea how to build an interpreter that returns a tree in java, which I can later use for printing in the screen, Im bit stack on how to start on it.

grammar myDSL;

options {
  language = Java;
}
@header {
  package DSL;
}
@lexer::header {
  package DSL;
}


program
    :  IDENT '={' components* '}'
    ;


components
    : IDENT '=('(shape)(shape|connectors)* ')'
    ;

shape
    :  'Box' '(' (INTEGER ','?)* ')'
    |  'Cylinder' '(' (INTEGER ','?)* ')'
    |  'Sphere' '(' (INTEGER ','?)* ')'
    ;

connectors
    :  type '(' (INTEGER ','?)* ')'
    ;    

type
    :  'MG'
    |  'EL'
    ;

IDENT: ('a'..'z' | 'A'..'Z')('a'..'z' | 'A'..'Z' | '0'..'0')*;

INTEGER: '0'..'9'+;

// This if for the empty spaces between tokens and avoids them in the parser
WS: (' ' | '\t' | '\n' | '\r' | '\f')+ {$channel=HIDDEN;};

COMMENT: '//' .* ('\n' | '\r') {$channel=HIDDEN;};
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A couple of remarks:

There's no need to set the language for Java, which is the default target language. So you can remove this:

options {
  language = Java;
}

Your IDENT contains an error:

IDENT: ('a'..'z' | 'A'..'Z')('a'..'z' | 'A'..'Z' | '0'..'0')*;

the '0'..'0') should most probably be '0'..'9').

The sub rule (INTEGER ','?)* also matches source like 1 2 3 4 (no comma's at all!). Perhaps you meant to do: (INTEGER (',' INTEGER)*)?

Now, as to your question: how to let ANTLR construct a proper AST? This can be done by adding output = AST; in your options block:

options {
  //language = Java;
  output = AST;
}

And then either adding the "tree operators" ^ and ! in your parser rules, or by using tree rewrite rules: rule: a b c -> ^(c b a).

The "tree operator" ^ is used to define the root of the (sub) tree and ! is used to exclude a token from the (sub) tree.

Rewrite rules have ^( /* tokens here */ ) where the first token (right after ^() is the root of the (sub) tree, and all following tokens are child nodes of the root.

An example might be in order. Let's take your first rule:

program
  :  IDENT '={' components* '}'
  ;

and you want to let IDENT be the root, components* the children and you want to exclude ={ and } from the tree. You can do that by doing:

program
  :  IDENT^ '={'! components* '}'!
  ;

or by doing:

program
  :  IDENT '={' components* '}' -> ^(IDENT components*)
  ;
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.