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I'm iterating through a HashMap (see my earlier question for more detail) and building a string consisting of the data contained in the Map. For each item, I will have a new line, but for the very last item, I don't want the new line. How can I achieve this? I was thinking I could so some kind of check to see if the entry is the last one or not, but I'm not sure how to actually do that.

Thanks!

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1  
In normal text file format, the "newline" really isn't a newline, it is a line terminator. Thus to be correctly formed, a file should have one on the last line. I don't know if you're writing to a file or not, so it may not apply. Reference: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newline –  rmeador Jan 15 '09 at 20:36
    
In this instance, I'm not writing to a file. But I typically end with a newline for writing files anyways. –  Blue Jan 27 '09 at 17:47

13 Answers 13

up vote 58 down vote accepted

Change your thought process from "append a line break all but the last time" to "prepend a line break all but the first time":

boolean first = true;
StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();

for (Map.Entry<MyClass.Key,String> entry : data.entrySet()) {
    if (first) {
        first = false;
    } else {
        builder.append("\n"); // Or whatever break you want
    }
    builder.append(entry.key())
           .append(": ")
           .append(entry.value());
}
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1  
Thanks! I especially appreciate the reference to a change in thought process. I often forget that there are myriad ways to solve these types of problems (you'd think I'd know better). –  Blue Jan 15 '09 at 20:31
    
With ordered collections, you can get rid of the boolean by creating the StringBuilder with the first item, then running the loop from i to the end: new StringBuilder(collection.get(0)); for(int i = 1; i < collection.size(); i++). Be sure to guard against empty collections. –  Outlaw Programmer Jan 15 '09 at 20:40
1  
@Blue: +1 for using "myriad" properly. Far too many people say "a myriad" which is like saying "the hoi polloi" :( –  Jon Skeet Jan 15 '09 at 20:47
    
This is even nicer when factoring the if/else into a Separator Class whose #toString method prints empty string in the first call, and the separator on all subsequent calls. –  akuhn Mar 5 '09 at 23:42
    
@Jon: +1 (not that you need it <g>). Nicely done. –  Ken White Mar 5 '09 at 23:51

one method (with apologies to Jon Skeet for borrowing part of his Java code):

StringBuilder result = new StringBuilder();

string newline = "";  
for (Map.Entry<MyClass.Key,String> entry : data.entrySet())
{
    result.append(newline)
       .append(entry.key())
       .append(": ")
       .append(entry.value());

    newline = "\n";
}
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6  
Oh that's very nice indeed. I like that a lot. So tempting to register more users to upvote more times ;) –  Jon Skeet Jan 15 '09 at 20:48
    
I do it that way, too thumbs up –  Xn0vv3r Jan 16 '09 at 5:57
    
Personally I see this as the lesser evil. I use it, but I don't like it. The code is cleaner than an if/else version, but you still have to look at it an extra moment to understand it. And it codes the delimiter at the end of the block rather than the top. I just don't know anything better. –  Joel Coehoorn Jan 16 '09 at 14:34
    
I use that pattern a lot –  martinus Jan 22 '09 at 19:35
    
Which operation is cheaper among assignment(Joel's) and condition(Jon's) that are done in every iteration? –  grayger Mar 6 '09 at 3:49

What about this?

StringBuilder result = new StringBuilder();

for(Map.Entry<MyClass.Key,String> entry : data.entrySet())
{
    builder.append(entry.key())
       .append(": ")
       .append(entry.value())
       .append("\n");
}

return builder.substring(0, builder.length()-1);

Obligatory apologies and thanks to both Jon and Joel for "borrowing" from their examples.

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1  
This is my typical approach to creating delimited strings. –  Wes P Jan 16 '09 at 19:16
3  
this gives a java.lang.StringIndexOutOfBoundsException with a empty list. –  pvgoddijn Jan 20 '09 at 12:52
1  
That exception is easy to fix with a simple if which checks if builder length is greater than 0. –  Domchi Mar 6 '09 at 0:05
1  
+1, this solution has better performance then the repetitive if-else check or the repetitive assignment to the newline string –  Yoni Jul 20 '10 at 10:49
4  
It would be more self-documenting if you used some constant DELIMITER = "\n",...append(DELIMITER), and then used ..., builder.length()-DELIMITER.length(). This would avoid bugs where someone changes the delimiter but forgets to update the -1 accordingly. –  Christophe Roussy Feb 4 '13 at 15:03

Ususally for these kind of things I use apache-commons-lang StringUtils#join. While it's not really hard to write all these kinds of utility functionality, it's always better to reuse existing proven libraries. Apache-commons is full of useful stuff like that!

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If you use iterator instead of for...each your code could look like this:

StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();

Iterator<Map.Entry<MyClass.Key, String>> it = data.entrySet().iterator();

while (it.hasNext()) {
    Map.Entry<MyClass.Key, String> entry = it.next();

    builder.append(entry.key())
    .append(": ")
    .append(entry.value());

    if (it.hasNext()) {
        builder.append("\n");
    }
}
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+1 - whenever I need to special-case the first/last element, I prefer doing it this way rather than using a boolean variable to detect the first character. –  Andrzej Doyle Jan 16 '09 at 14:20

This is probably a better example...

final StringBuilder buf = new StringBuilder();
final String separator = System.getProperty("line.separator"); // Platform new line
for (Map.Entry<MyClass.Key,String> entry: data.entrySet()) {
    builder.append(entry.key())
       .append(": ")
       .append(entry.value())
       .append(separator);
}
// Remove the last separator and return a string to use.
// N.b. this is likely as efficient as just using builder.toString() 
// which would also copy the buffer, except we have 1 char less 
// (i.e. '\n').
final String toUse = builder.substring(0, builder.length()-separator.length()-1);
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Here's my succinct version, which uses the StringBuilder's length property instead of an extra variable:

StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();

for (Map.Entry<MyClass.Key,String> entry : data.entrySet())
{
    builder.append(builder.length() > 0 ? "\n" : "")
           .append(entry.key())
           .append(": ")
           .append(entry.value());
}

(Apologies and thanks to both Jon and Joel for "borrowing" from their examples.)

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One solution is to create a custom wrapper to StringBuilder. It can't be extended, thus a wrapper is required.

public class CustomStringBuilder {

final String separator = System.getProperty("line.separator");

private StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();

public CustomStringBuilder appendLine(String str){
    builder.append(str + separator);
    return this;
}

public CustomStringBuilder append(String str){
    builder.append(str);
    return this;
}

public String toString() {
    return this.builder.toString();
}

}

Implementation like such:

CustomStringBuilder builder = new CustomStringBuilder();

//iterate over as needed, but a wrapper to StringBuilder with new line features.

builder.appendLine("data goes here");
return builder.toString();

This does have some downsides:

  • Writing code that's typically not "domain / business" centric
  • Not using open source standard solution like: StringUtils.join
  • Forced to maintain a class that wraps a JDK class that's final and thus updates required long term.

I went with the StringUtils.join solution for iterating over collections and even building lightweight build method patterns in the code.

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Assuming your foreach loop goes through the file in order just add a new line to every string and remove the last new line when your loop exits.

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Not sure if this is the best, but it´s the easier way to do:

loop through all the values and append the \n normally in the stringbuffer. Then, do something like this

sb.setLength(sb.length()-1);
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this works for linux/unix where line separator char is '\n' and for mac where it is '\r' but for other OSes like windows which is "\r\n" this doesn't really work, you should check the length of the line terminator from the system properties. –  Paulo Lopes Jan 15 '09 at 21:36
    
The op explicitly said he was appending '\n', so the length is known. –  Richard Campbell Jan 15 '09 at 22:02
    
Agree with Paulo, not a good assumption to hard-code. –  Bill K Mar 5 '09 at 23:50

This is where a join method, to complement split, would come in handy, because then you could just join all the elements using a new line as the separator, and of course it doesn't append a new line to the end of the result; that's how I do it in various scripting languages (Javascript, PHP, etc.).

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If you use Class Separator, you can do

StringBuilder buf = new StringBuilder();
Separator separator = new Separator("\n");
for (Map.Entry<MyClass.Key,String> entry: data.entrySet()) {
    builder.append(separator)
       .append(entry.key())
       .append(": ")
       .append(entry.value());
}

The separator prints in empty string upon its first use, and the separator upon all subsequent uses.

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Ha! Thanks to this post I've found another way to do this:

public static class Extensions
{
    public static string JoinWith(this IEnumerable<string> strings, string separator)
    {
        return String.Join(separator, strings.ToArray());
    }
}

Of course this is in C# now and Java won't (yet) support the extension method, but you ought to be able to adapt it as needed — the main thing is the use of String.Join anyway, and I'm sure java has some analog for that.

Also note that this means doing an extra iteration of the strings, because you must first create the array and then iterate over that to build your string. Also, you will create the array, where with some other methods you might be able to get by with an IEnumerable that only holds one string in memory at a time. But I really like the extra clarity.

Of course, given the Extension method capability you could just abstract any of the other code into an extension method as well.

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